September is Coastal Cleanup Month with a new look for 2020

September 15, 2020 by  
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Beach and coastline cleanups have been a focus of many caring citizens and environmental groups for decades. The most-publicized beach cleanup effort, Coastal Cleanup Day, is typically slotted for a day in September. This year, the event has expanded into an entire month with the goal of involving more people at every level and from every community — not just those near the beach. According to Surfrider Foundation , “International Coastal Cleanup Month (formerly International Coastal Cleanup Day) is one of the world’s largest annual preservation and protection events and volunteer efforts for our ocean, waves and beaches.” Register your own coastal cleanup — wherever that may be One conservation organization, Heal the Bay in Los Angeles County, serves as an example of this campaign by helping citizens coordinate their own cleanup efforts with a centralized registration system. As residents register events, other volunteers can join the effort to coordinate larger cleanup activities. Related: Atlantic has 10 times the microplastics previously thought The centralized information also allows organizers to track the amount and types of garbage removed. Knowing what has been collected is an effective way to identify the source of the pollution and provide data for policymakers. Save Our Shores recommends downloading the Clean Swell App to keep track of the items in your trash pile. “Data collection is an important part of Coastal Cleanup Day,” Save Our Shores explained. “The data that is collected about the types and quantities of debris picked up can be used for outreach, policy and advocacy, and more!” Further, the organization suggests that one member of the cleanup party be in charge of data collection to reduce the spread of germs. Safety tips for your beach cleanup To support community efforts, Heal the Bay provides tutorials and tips for safe and effective cleanups with information on how to dispose of collected trash and abide by LA County Public Health guidelines along with details regarding supplies and parking. Each region has varying needs, so participants can access specific information for their neighborhood. During this time of the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, the organization encourages social distancing during cleanups as well as the use of masks and gloves. Participants should only work with members of their own household and stay home if they feel ill. If you are in an area impacted by the ongoing wildfires, Heal the Bay advises you to also stay home to minimize your exposure to the smoke. Why is Coastal Cleanup Month important? The primary goal of Coastal Clean Up Month is to reduce the amount of debris that ends up in the waterways, including the ocean. Ocean pollution, particularly plastic from inland as well as boating activities, has become a massive environmental issue in recent years. The cycle is toxic. Animals are harmed by items like six-pack rings and plastic bags. Plastic in the waterways begins to break down into microplastics, which marine animals ingest. This comes full circle as seafood that may contain microplastics lands onto our dinner plates. In addition to waste removal, a secondary goal is to educate communities about the hazards of ocean pollution and share the importance of marine life and aquatic biodiversity. In addition, the event promotes more sustainable activities such as recycling and minimizing waste. Make a difference one small step at a time To support these educational efforts, Heal the Bay maintains five programs that, “allow citizens to explore and learn about the various issues facing the diverse regions that make up Los Angeles.” Volunteers can facilitate touch tank visits at the aquarium, participate in a beach cleanup , spread information through the outreach program, contribute to community science by collecting data or register middle and high school students as part of the youth program. The coordination in Los Angeles is just a sampling of similar events across the nation and around the world. In fact, Coastal Cleanup Month is a global movement that includes 6 million volunteers in 90 countries. Even though the efforts are widespread, coronavirus restrictions have resulted in several canceled events and made it difficult for organizers of various organizations to spotlight the effort this year. With that in mind, the push is for more of a grassroots coordination of many small groups rather than fewer large ones.  Related: How to volunteer during COVID-19 That means the entire month of September is prime time to get out and lead your own cleanup crew, whether that’s a party of one or up to 10 people within the same household. With 30 years behind this organized beach cleanup movement, organizers report disappointment in not being able to host large events. However, they say this is an opportunity for every citizen to tackle the garbage in their own area, whether that be the street, park, mountain, sides of the roadway or parking lot. Although that may feel a little off-point, the majority of the garbage that ends up in the ocean stems from further inland, so you can think of it as confronting the problem at the source. While it might seem that a neighborhood pickup isn’t enough, individual efforts make a huge impact. As an example, Heal the Bay provides inspiration in the fact that, “In 2019, the Ocean Conservancy reports that nearly 800,000 volunteers collectively removed more than 20 million pieces of trash from beaches and waterways around the world. That’s 20 million fewer potential impacts on whales, turtles and other beloved ocean wildlife.” So whether in groups of 1,000 or one, those same hands can make a difference for the health of our planet. + Heal the Bay + Surfrider Foundation + Save Our Shores Images via Adobe Stock

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September is Coastal Cleanup Month with a new look for 2020

An idea for solving the plastics crisis

September 15, 2020 by  
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An idea for solving the plastics crisis Sara Kingman Tue, 09/15/2020 – 01:30 A major problem with behavior-change programs in the waste industry is that they rely on consumers being taught to feel the guilt of plastic in the ocean, and the harm to turtles and whales. They’ve tried to condition people to believe that if we buy so-called “zero waste kits,” choose zucchini and cucumbers without plastic shrink-wrap and champion our favorite reusable metal straws, these choices alone somehow will drive a reduction in single-use plastics. While these steps can provide some benefit — and the strategy of creating consumer guilt shouldn’t be entirely discredited — this narrative is misguided. Ultimately, it never will address the root of the issue. Instead, savvy leaders in architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) are focusing more attention on the plastics industry — and by extension, the oil industry. First, those producers and their trade groups for decades have driven misleading, consumer-centric campaigns that redirect societal blame and attention away from the pollution they create. The classic examples include “sustainability” statements made by plastics industry leaders promoting recycling . These campaigns insinuate: “If consumers recycle correctly, the waste problem will be solved and the Great Pacific Garbage Patch will disappear.” This is plainly false propaganda, evident first by the astounding fact that a mere 8.4 percent of America’s plastic waste is actually recycled . Regardless whether designers of the built environment are involved in the policies of overseas plastics recycling, we create structures in which plastics are fixed in place and the spaces that plastics move through. As a society and as AEC professionals, we can’t continue allowing the plastics industry and oil producers to govern our approach to sustainability. Plastics are the problem — and recycling is not the solution. So how can more professionals in building design and construction make a difference? First, admit that recycling is broken. For the past decade, American consumers and businesses have relied on China to accept our immeasurable wave of plastic waste. The U.S. was not sending clean, recyclable material but rather plastics covered in food remains, which turned into mold in the transportation process and became excessively difficult to process upon arrival. Inevitably, by 2018 China instituted a strict contamination allowance under the National Sword policy, which effectively meant Americans no longer could export plastic waste to China. No one blames China for this decision — U.S. leaders should have had the foresight and environmental consciousness to realize the process relied on for the previous decade was not only unsustainable, it also wasn’t even a cost-effective solution for the long term. Now is the time to look domestically and reframe U.S. waste management — and quickly, because in the meantime America’s plastic waste is being landfilled and burned at an alarming rate, both domestically and abroad. Second, consider the AEC industry’s potentially powerful role in this. Regardless whether designers of the built environment are involved in the policies of overseas plastics recycling, we create structures in which plastics are fixed in place and the spaces that plastics move through. Clearly, we can have a significant impact. For example, building designers should: Create sustainable purchasing policies for clients, to be enforced throughout the lifetime of a building’s operations, governing the behaviors of all tenants. These would ensure single-use materials, and especially single-use plastic purchases, are minimized throughout the building’s lifetime. The policy facilitates the best opportunities to allow occupants to act in an environmentally conscious manner. Specify Red List -free building materials . This eliminates all toxic and socially harmful materials, simultaneously decreasing reliance on petrochemicals. Keep in mind, even if plastic building products are retained in situ for 60 years, at end-of-life they are still being landfilled. It’s unhealthy, and we don’t need and shouldn’t foster use of these materials in any buildings. Advocate for improvements to building materials and assemblies. More AEC leaders need to ask vendors and manufacturers to improve their products by decoupling from petrochemical-based ingredients. Many would be glad to comply. It’s time to face down this challenge. It is the responsibility of designers of the built environment to operate beyond our traditionally defined boundaries and insist our buildings meet the highest standards possible. It is also our responsibility to be educators and help show those around us how to ensure a healthy and sustainable world for future generations. The problem is not consumer choices or their commitment to recycling correctly — the problem is plastics, period. Without doubt or hesitation, we need action today by the AEC industry to stop the cycle of pollution from this endemic industry. Pull Quote Regardless whether designers of the built environment are involved in the policies of overseas plastics recycling, we create structures in which plastics are fixed in place and the spaces that plastics move through. Topics Circular Economy Buildings Plastic Procurement Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off

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An idea for solving the plastics crisis

Policy for a Circular Economy: Part 2

September 15, 2020 by  
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Policy for a Circular Economy: Part 2 How should diverse corporate stakeholders —such as brands and packaging producers — help shape the U.S. policy landscape around plastics, recycling and solid waste management? This two part policy session, organized in collaboration with the The Recycling Partnership, will focus on the role that brand and packaging producers can play in forging a stronger policy environment in the U.S. to create more circular outcomes. The steady growth of public attention around plastics and packaging has led to a revitalized policy focus in the U.S. on recycling and solid waste management in 2020. Historically, brands and packaging producers have played an antagonistic role in the U.S. packaging policy landscape. However, the emergence of a circular economy opportunity and the urgency of science-based action are creating the conditions for value chain engagement and collective participation in the policymaking process. Speakers Elizabeth Biser, VP Policy & Public Affairs, The Recycling Partnership Nicole Collier, Director of Policy & Public Affairs, Nestlé Dylan de Thomas, VP of Industry Collaboration, The Recycling Partnership Missy Owens, Director, Government Relations, Federal & Diplomatic, Coca-Cola  Holly Secon Mon, 09/14/2020 – 23:59 Featured Off

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30 new marine species found in Galapagos’ deep seas

September 9, 2020 by  
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The  Galapagos  Islands are famous for several endemic species that evolved to fit the exact niche required to live on rocky islands 600 miles off the coast of Ecuador in the Pacific Ocean. Now, marine scientists have found 30 new species deep beneath the ocean’s surface around the Galapagos.  Using cutting-edge remote operated vehicles (ROV), expedition crews from the  Charles Darwin Foundation , the  Galapagos National Park Directorate and the  Ocean Exploration Trust  explored seamounts as far down as 3,400 meters. Seamounts are extinct underwater  mountains  entirely covered by seawater. Until now, the Galapagos seamounts were largely unexplored. Related: Iguanas reintroduced to island after 200 years The 30 newly identified species include 10 bamboo corals, 11 sponges, four squat lobsters and a brittle star. Scientists also found four new octocorals. Commonly known as sea fans, octocorals are polyp-bearing  corals . One of the four new octocorals is the first giant solitary soft coral found in the Tropical Eastern Pacific. These new research findings come from a 10-day cruise on the 64-meter research vessel the E/V Nautilus. Scientists manipulated arms on the ship’s two ROVs to collect biological and geological specimens. After the expedition, the team sent these samples to deep-sea experts for identification and analysis. “The many discoveries made on this expedition showcase the importance of deep-sea exploration to developing an understanding of our oceans and the power of telepresence to build a diverse team of experts,” Dr. Nicole Raineault, chief scientist of the Ocean Exploration Trust, said in a press release. “Since we never know what we’re going to find, we utilize land-based scientists who watch the ROV dives from home and communicate directly with the shipboard team in real time, to help determine what is truly new and worthy of further investigation or sampling. Scientists studying the resulting video, data, and specimens make an astonishing number of discoveries, reminding us how little we know about the deep  sea .” The new deep-sea dwelling creatures will never become as familiar to visitors as more visible endemic species, such as the Galapagos penguin, giant  tortoises and marine iguanas. Still, these species hint at the many mysteries dwelling in Earth’s oceans. + Charles Darwin Foundation Via EcoWatch Images via Ocean Exploration Trust/Nautilus Live and Pexels

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30 new marine species found in Galapagos’ deep seas

Palau is pioneering a new model of sustainable tourism

September 4, 2020 by  
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In partnership with Sustainable Travel International and Slow Food , the Palau Bureau of Tourism has launched a new project aimed at mitigating its tourism-based carbon footprint. The project’s long-term goal is to establish the island country as the world’s first official carbon-neutral tourism destination. With a focus on specific approaches to sustainable tourism , such as promoting local food production and developing a transparent carbon management plan, the project is sure to serve as an inspiration to other countries. Palau is a Pacific Island nation that is world-renowned for its natural beauty and considered one of the top marine tourism destinations in the world. The archipelago is made up of about 200 natural limestone and lush volcanic islands surrounded by crystal-clear lagoons. Unsurprisingly, scuba diving and snorkeling are some of the most popular tourist activities in Palau, thanks to the pristine coral reefs and an abundance of sea creatures. Jellyfish Lake, part of the island chain’s famous Rock Islands and connected to the ocean through a series of tunnels, is home to millions of jellyfish that migrate across the lake every day. The therapeutic clay of the “Milky Way” lagoon is said to contain age-rejuvenating components that attract locals and tourists alike. Related: 7 sustainable travel experiences to have this summer as an ecotourist In 2019, there were over 89,000 international tourists who visited the islands. This is considerable, seeing as the small country only has a population of just under 22,000. With such massive visitor numbers compared to permanent residents, the tourism industry is the main source of economic income and employment on the islands by far. “If the current COVID-19 crisis has taught us anything, it’s that we must strengthen our nation’s resilience to external threats — the greatest of which is climate change ,” said Kevin Mesebeluu, director of the Palau Bureau of Tourism. “Palau is blessed with some of the world’s most pristine natural resources, inherited through culture and tradition, and placed in our trust for the future generation. We must work to actively protect them, while also investing in our people. Palau embraces sustainable tourism as the only path forward in the new era of travel, and we believe that our destination can and must be carbon neutral.” Palau’s precious marine resources, small size and dependence on tourism make it extremely vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. The dangers of rising sea temperatures threaten the country’s marine ecosystems, coastal communities and important tourism industry. As is the unfortunate case with many vulnerable travel destinations, the large-scale tourist industry — despite providing the main source of livelihood for its residents — is also responsible for a portion of its carbon emissions and threats to local heritage sites. The remote island nation has relied heavily on imported food from overseas as well as carbon-heavy airline travel and activities in the past, habits that the new sustainable travel project plans to address. Palau has since taken extensive measures to protect its environment and promote responsible tourism. Once such a measure, deemed the “Palau Pledge,” became the world’s first mandatory visitor eco-pledge. Upon entry, all tourists are required to sign a pledge promising to act in an environmentally conscious and overall sustainable manner during their travels in order to protect the islands for future generations to come. Tourists risk a fine if they’re found engaging in activities like collecting marine life souvenirs, feeding fish or sharks , touching or stepping on coral, littering and disrespecting local culture. The program also bans tour operators from using single-use plastics and implements the world’s strictest national reef-safe sunscreen standard . Initiatives that increase local food sourcing reduce the country’s carbon footprint and set the destination up for food security success in the event of natural or economic disasters. This section of the project is imperative to showcasing the islands’ culinary heritage and building up the local income opportunities of Palau fishers and farmers. Even better, the program will put a specific emphasis on sustainable agricultural products and female-owned businesses. “The rapid growth of an unsustainable tourist industry based on broken food systems has been a key driver of the climate crisis and ecosystem destruction,” said Paolo di Croce, general secretary of Slow Food International. “This project represents the antithesis, a solution that strives to strengthen and restore value to local food systems, reduce the cultural and environmental damage caused by food imports, and improve the livelihoods of food producers both in Palau and beyond.” Becoming carbon-conscious doesn’t end with reducing carbon emissions; the tourism industry as it is will always have unavoidable carbon emissions from things like transportation and outdoor activities. To compensate, Palau has implemented an online carbon management platform for its visitors. The program will allow tourists to calculate a personal carbon footprint associated with their trip and provide offsetting opportunities that are in line with the country’s marine conservation and environmental restoration goals. Sustainable Travel International estimates that the platform has the potential to raise over $1 million per year for carbon-reducing initiatives. “This project has enormous potential to transform the traditional tourism model and is a notable step toward lessening the industry’s climate impact,” said Paloma Zapata, CEO of Sustainable Travel International. “Destinations around the world face these same challenges of balancing tourism growth with environmental protection. Carbon neutrality is the future of tourism and the direction that all destinations must head as they recover from COVID-19. We commend Palau for their continued leadership, and hope this inspires other destinations to strengthen their own climate resilience strategies.” + Sustainable Travel International Images via Sustainable Travel International

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Palau is pioneering a new model of sustainable tourism

Gardenhouse in Beverly Hills boasts one of the nations largest green walls

September 4, 2020 by  
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International architectural practice MAD Architects has completed the Gardenhouse, a mixed-use development in Beverly Hills that is the firm’s first project in the U.S. and hosts one of the largest living green walls in the country. Designed to mimic the neighborhood’s lush and hilly landscape, Gardenhouse combines ground-floor commercial space with 18 above-ground residential units that appear to “grow” out of the building’s living green wall. Inspired by a “hillside village,” the residential units appear as a cluster of white gabled structures of varying sizes for an eye-catching and playful look. Located at 8600 Wilshire Boulevard on a prominent corner lot, the 48,000-square-foot Gardenhouse immediately draws the eye with its massive, two-story green wall covered in lush plantings of native , drought-tolerant succulents and vines selected for minimal maintenance and irrigation. True to the design’s image of a “hillside village,” the building offers a variety of housing typologies including two studios, eight condominiums, three townhouses and five villas. Each unit is defined by a pitched-roof volume and comes with an independent entry and exit circulation route as well as access to underground parking. Related: MAD brings a surreal sports campus that mimics a green, martian landscape to China At the heart of the cluster of white gabled “houses” is a private, second-floor landscaped courtyard that the architects have dubbed a surprising “secret garden” in an urban environment. Each home is also equipped with a balcony for overlooking the shared courtyard.  “ Los Angeles and Beverly Hills are highly modernized and developed,” said Ma Yansong, founder of MAD Architects. “Their residences on the hills seemingly coexist with the urban environment. However, they also see enclosed movement at their core. The commune connection between the urban environment and nature is isolated. What new perspectives, and new value, can we bring to Los Angeles? Perhaps, we can create a hill in the urban context, so people can live on it and make it a village. This place will be half urban, half nature. This can offer an interesting response to Beverly Hills: a neighborhood which is often carefully organized and maintained, now with a witty, playful new resident.” + MAD Architects Photography by Nic Lehoux and Darren Bradley via MAD Architects

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Gardenhouse in Beverly Hills boasts one of the nations largest green walls

The U.S. Plastics Pact launches new initiative to redesign the plastics value chain at Circularity 20

September 2, 2020 by  
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The U.S. Plastics Pact launches new initiative to redesign the plastics value chain at Circularity 20 Holly Secon Wed, 09/02/2020 – 00:45 The U.S. recycling market has been in free fall since 2018, when China, Malaysia, Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries announced that they would no longer import many types of recyclable material scraps. Of course, the U.S. recycling system had been a mess for far longer — seeing as the country never fully developed the infrastructure to recycle anywhere near the amount of plastic waste it produces. Indeed, only 8.4 percent of all the plastic produced in 2017 eventually got recycled, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency .  But a new agreement announced last week at Circularity 20, GreenBiz Group’s virtual conference on the circular economy, has the potential to change that: The U.S. Plastics Pact. This new initiative is a collaborative project launched by the Recycling Partnership and the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) that aims to redesign the way the United States uses plastics so that they don’t become waste in the first place. The effort is part of the Ellen MacArthur Foundation’s global Plastics Pact network: The think tank has helped organize key public and private stakeholders to push towards a circular economy for plastic in countries around the world, from the United Kingdom to Chile to South Africa. Redesigning the way we use one of the most ubiquitous and convenient materials on the planet won’t be easy. But the initiative is setting distinct targets and deadlines for meeting them. Shooting for 2025, its main goals are: Make sure all plastic packaging is 100 percent reusable, recyclable or compostable  Take action to ensure that 50 percent of plastic packaging is recycled or composted Have the average recycled content or responsibly sourced bio-based content in plastic packaging be 30 percent The U.S. Plastics Pact has gathered more than 60 prominent partners, which will provide research and funding. They include local governments from Arizona to Texas to California; NGOs such as the Ocean Conservancy and The United States Composting Council; and companies ranging from Eastman to Target. All of these stakeholders have to agree to work in a pre-competitive environment towards the Pact’s targets. So what will this new collaboration look like? Stephanie Kersten-Johnston, director of innovation at the Recycling Partnership, told GreenBiz that she expects it to be not just a network, but “a network on fire” — with all partners engaged to take the most effective action and make the most impact on the targets. In some ways it’s a support group for organizations to meet these targets, but we can’t just expect some representatives talking — we need the full value chain in there acting. “In some ways it’s a support group for organizations to meet these targets, but we can’t just expect some representatives talking — we need the full value chain in there acting,” she added. A recycling facility for PET bottles, which can be transformed to make new products including carpeting and sneakers. Media Source Shutterstock Media Authorship Alba_alioth Close Authorship Hitting the target: How the U.S. Plastics Pact aims to achieve its ambitious goals 2025 isn’t too far off, so the U.S. Plastics Pact is getting started right away, according to Kersten-Johnston. In the first six months to one year, developing a roadmap will be the top priority for the project. “So we set these targets, these aspirations — but what are the practical steps we need to get there?” she said. “In the first year, this will look like network meetings,” she explained. “In practice, groups [of partner organizations] will be convening that will be called ‘workstreams.’ They focus on smaller, specific topics that can’t be solved by a singular organization … where the work is done, where the research is undertaken, and the formulation of the practical steps will take place.” For example, workstreams include deciding on the data that will be used. “How do we agree to tight definitions that we haven’t agreed on before?” Kersten-Johnston added. “What does that look like in the U.S. in practice? What cadence are we measuring on? What data sources will we be using?” If certain types of plastic are too hard to recycle or reuse, meaning they don’t have an end-of-life, they can’t have any place in a circular economy for plastics. Another workstream will decide which plastic materials are too problematic and unnecessary, and need simply to be eliminated from production. If certain types of plastic are too hard to recycle or reuse, meaning they don’t have an end of life, they can’t have any place in a circular economy for plastics.  After that, the organizations along the plastics value chain — from chemical companies to product designers to plastic recycling facilities and municipalities to materials recovery groups — will rework their operations in line with the targets.  That’s where the power of having corporate partners from several sectors comes in. Large companies and governments have been saying for years that they want to work to eliminate single-use plastics. In the past few years, there have been a flurry of plastics-related commitments. McDonald’s , for example, set a commitment in 2018 that its 36,000 restaurants would use only packaging from renewable, recycled or certified sustainable sources by 2025. Coca-Cola also announced it would help collect and recycle “the equivalent” of 100 percent of its packaging and make bottles with an average of 50 percent recycled content by 2030. Nestle , Disney , Starbucks , IKEA and others also have pledged to cut down on single-use plastics over that time. For all these companies, working together to make a better plastics value chain, from producing more recyclable plastics to creating more chemical recycling facilities, will enable them to meet both their targets and the targets of the entire U.S. Plastics Pact more easily. “We can start to address the plastic waste issue by taking fast and transformative action at every point in the plastic cycle,” said Viviana Alvarez, head of sustainability, North America, at Unilever, in a statement. “Recycling alone can’t solve the circular economy, but the circular economy can help solve the problem on waste and recycling. Keeping plastic in the economy and out of the environment will require everyone to work together — whether that’s product designers, governments, consumers or the waste management industry.” A history of the Global Plastics Pact The Ellen MacArthur Foundation first created its Global Plastic Pact as part of its New Plastics Economy Global Commitment in 2016. The circular economy powerhouse got over 20 percent of all global plastic packaging companies to pledge to address plastic waste and pollution at its source. (In total, more than 450 organizations have joined their global pacts around the world, according to the Ellen MacArthur Foundation.) These Global Plastics Pact are networks of plastic waste initiatives in different countries, which the Ellen MacArthur Foundation organizes.  They include the UK Plastics Pact , the Pacte National sur les emballages plastiques in France, Circula El Plástico in Chile, the Plastic Pact NL  (Dutch) in the Netherlands, the South African Plastics Pact , and the Pacto Português para os Plásticos  (Portuguese) in Portugal. Each country’s goals are slightly different, based on the infrastructure of the location, and the U.S. is the latest initiative. “There was an unspoken question in the U.S. about how we were going to meet these targets, particularly how we were going to achieve particularly closing the gaps between supply and demand so everyone viewed it as a topic that needed to be tackled but it was never addressed,” Kersten-Johnston described. So the Recycling Partnership stepped up to meet the massive opportunity in the U.S.: transforming the waste management system of the biggest economy in the world to foster sustainability on a massive scale. Pull Quote In some ways it’s a support group for organizations to meet these targets, but we can’t just expect some representatives talking — we need the full value chain in there acting. If certain types of plastic are too hard to recycle or reuse, meaning they don’t have an end-of-life, they can’t have any place in a circular economy for plastics. Topics Circular Economy Waste Management Plastic Plastic Waste Circularity 20 Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off

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Seaweed Girl explores seaweed as an eco-textile for sustainable fashion

September 1, 2020 by  
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Sustainable fashion is on the rise, with materials from plastic water bottles to vegan apple leather becoming more and more common in the industry every day. Recent design graduate Jasmine Linington is taking sustainable fashion a step further with a new couture collection that uses seaweed-derived textiles. The eco-friendly and thoughtful clothing displays the versatility of this ocean resource through seaweed fibers, dyes and embellishments. “Having fallen in love with seaweed for its utter beauty and endless visual inspiration, whether that be for its colour, texture or composition, it was this initial capture that began the journey into my ‘ Seaweed Girl ’ project,” Linington said. “I have since spent the last few years exploring ways in which I can incorporate this alternative, highly sustainable material into my practice in a way that showcases its beauty, but also its environmental benefits.” Related: Surprising ways seaweed benefits the environment After learning that seaweed and microalgae make up about 90% of plant life on the planet, Linington became motivated to find innovative ways to use seaweed in fashion. Seaweed and microalgae are highly sustainable, especially because they are some of the fastest growing organisms on Earth. The inventive artist hand-harvests seaweed from the southeastern coast of Scotland to create the pieces. Linington develops the plants into beads and sequins for embellishments with a resin made from the byproducts of the harvesting process. For the fabrics , seaweed and eucalyptus cellulose combine to create SeaCell fibers. Seaweed is also used in the dying process to color the fabrics. These processes mean that everything in the collection is carbon-neutral and biodegradable. Linington’s project is ongoing. Next, the artist will be working on a line of textile wall hangings and artwork inspired by the seaweed collection as well as a small range of luxury interior accessories. + Jasmine Linington Via Dezeen Images via Jasmine Linington

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Seaweed Girl explores seaweed as an eco-textile for sustainable fashion

Sustainable teak home blends into the Costa Rican hills

August 19, 2020 by  
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San Jose-based Studio Saxe has completed Tres Amores, a contemporary family home that takes in spectacular ocean and mountain views in Costa Rica. Nestled on the hilltops in the town of Nosara, the luxury home was designed to blend in with its lush surroundings through its staggered massing and natural materials palette, which includes exterior cladding of charred teak wood with black-framed windows. The home also takes full advantage of its beautiful surroundings with an emphasis on indoor/ outdoor living via floor-to-ceiling glazing and sheltered outdoor patios. In response to the seismic conditions and constrained footprint of the site, the architects created a lightweight steel structure that was pre-cut offsite and then quickly assembled onsite. The structure is wrapped in sustainably sourced teak wood cladding that was charred for longevity and finished with natural oils. The dark exterior takes cues from the landscape.  Related: Luxury prefab Costa Rican home features dramatic wing-like roof Covering an area of approximately 515 square meters, Tres Amores is spread out across two staggered floors topped with extended horizontal roof planes that shield the interiors from the sun. The living spaces located on the lower floor connect to the private bedrooms above via a light-filled stairwell with full-height glazing that frames views of the ocean. The interior decor is kept minimalist so as not to detract from the landscape views. As with all of Studio Saxe’s projects, special design consideration was given to sustainability and site conditions. Tres Amores’ bioclimatic design was informed by site studies that include wind patterns, sun exposure and temperature data. The home further minimizes energy use with solar hot water heaters and water recycling through filters and state-of-the-art treatment plant systems. The architects said, “This design is a clear reflection of an approach to design that combines high tech preemptive design with low tech construction methods.” + Studio Saxe Photography by Andres Garcia Lachner via Studio Saxe

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Sustainable teak home blends into the Costa Rican hills

Adidas releases 3 new trail shoes with eco-friendly features

August 17, 2020 by  
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Adidas is a well-known brand in the athletic shoe realm, and it has also been a champion of sustainable design with its 5-year partnership with Parley for the Oceans. Now, Adidas has released three new products that incorporate sustainable features, including upcycled ocean plastic from Parley , as a means to take the heat off the planet and transfer it into sweat on the trail. The first shoe in the PROTOHYPE series is the Adidas Terrex Two Ultra Parley. It features a roomy fit, a “Continental” rubber outsole for ultimate grip on both wet and dry surfaces and a rocker design that facilitates foot motion during use. This shoe was designed specifically to provide cushion and comfort while on the trail. The stretchy, breathable upper portion is made from Parley Ocean Plastic, a material made from plastic waste collected on islands, beaches, coastal communities and shorelines before it can reach the ocean. Related: Adidas continues drive toward sustainable manufacturing with FUTURECRAFT.LOOP performance shoe The second shoe option is the Adidas Terrex Two Parley. This version is more of a multipurpose selection with many of the same features as the similarly named Adidas Terrex Two Ultra Parley. The cushioning, comfort, rocker design, upcycled Parley Ocean Plastic upper and fit are all alike in both styles. The main difference is that the Ultra offers a different type of energy transfer in the midsole to better adapt for rocky terrain. The third option in this release is the Adidas Agravic BOA, which is designed for protection and stability on rocky, technical and rough terrain. These feature an easy tightening mechanism and an abrasion-resistant TPU molded toe cap to offer protection from rough surfaces. The Agravic BOA uses “Dope” dye, a process where dye is injected directly into raw materials, conserving water compared to the typical dying process. Adidas Terrex Two Parley review I hate buying shoes. Always. With narrow feet, a high arch and back issues, I don’t have the option for cute at the cost of function. So when Adidas offered to send me a pair of the new Terrex Two Parley sneakers for review, I was bracing myself for the inevitable pinching, rubbing, squeezing or lack of support I typically encounter during shoe hunts. In short, I was blissfully surprised. Although I appreciate an eye-catching shoe, the bright colors had me feeling a little self-conscious at first. However, I did feel safe that I would be easily noticed as a pedestrian , and I quickly adapted to the look as I headed out with my pup for a neighborhood walk. The shoes are easy to get on and off with a flexible yet snug slide-on design. The laces are more for looks than function, because the shoe fits like a glove on my foot. I found the foot bed to be narrow where it needed to be (the heel) and roomy at the widest point without allowing too much extra space on the sides. This cut combined with outstanding heel support makes for an extremely comfortable shoe. In fact, I slipped them on right out of the box and trekked two miles. In subsequent days, I’ve put another 10 miles on them across both gravel and pavement. The traction is reliable on all terrains I’ve tested so far, and the thick sole makes it feel like there is no difference between varying surfaces. Most surprisingly, I experienced zero rubbing and they required no “break in” period to get comfortable. I will admit the price point is more than I typically pay, but I’ve discovered there are comfortable and cute shoes on the market after all. + Adidas Images via Adidas and Dawn Hammon / Inhabitat Editor’s Note: This product review is not sponsored by Adidas. All opinions on the products and company are the author’s own.

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Adidas releases 3 new trail shoes with eco-friendly features

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