Can manufacturing green sand beaches save our planet?

June 30, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

It sounds too good to be true — spread some rocks on a beach and the ocean will do the work to remove carbon dioxide from the air, reversing global warming. But that’s a very simplified explanation of what Project Vesta hopes to accomplish. The idea is to accelerate a natural process. When rain falls on volcanic rocks, it weathers them down, then flows into the ocean. There, oceans further break down the rocks. Carbon dioxide removed from the air becomes bicarbonate, which helps grow the shells of marine organisms and is stored in limestone on the ocean floor. Project Vesta wants to speed up this process by grinding up olivine — a common, gray-green silicate that weathers quickly — and spreading it on beaches and in shallow shelf seas around the world. It has worked in a lab, but will it work in the real world? We’re about to find out, as Project Vesta is now preparing a pilot beach in the Caribbean. Related: Demand for sand — the largest mining industry no one talks about Origins of Project Vesta Project Vesta has rounded up an international crew of scientists, environmentalists, futurists and financial experts since its founding on Earth Day 2019. The not-for-profit organization sprang from a think tank called Climitigation , Project Vesta executive director Tom Green told Inhabitat. “It’s very clear at this point that in order to avoid the worst effects of global warming, reducing emissions will not be enough,” Green said. “Maybe 20 years ago that would have been a viable path. But at this point, even though we should reduce emissions , that on its own will not be enough to avoid the worst scenario.” Climitigation examined different ways to reverse global warming , prioritizing them according to their viability. The idea of coastal weathering came to the top, Green said, “as being potentially very, very cheap, very scalable, a permanent carbon catcher, with relatively little attention that had been paid to it so far. So Project Vesta was founded out of that think tank, and we exist to further the science of enhanced weathering ultimately to galvanize global deployment that will help reverse climate change.” The idea of coastal weathering has 30 years of academic research in the fields of biology and geochemistry behind it. But it had stalled out, unable to cross the financial chasm from academic to mainstream, said Green, who trained as a biologist before spending 20 years in business at various tech companies. “Nobody had come along and said, ‘Okay, I’m going to push this forward.’ That’s what we’re here to do.” The pilot beach Scientists at Project Vesta had a set of criteria for finding the right pilot beach. “We scoured the world for an ideal site,” Green said. “This initial site that we found is great for our pilot beach site. It’s a fairly enclosed cove, which means the water has a pretty low refresh rate. Which means that as the chemical reaction happens, there’s enough time for the biogeochemical indicators to change before the water gets washed away into ocean.” In a few months, after thoroughly measuring the test cove, Project Vesta will cover the pilot beach with ground olivine. Then comes the monitoring phase. Scientists will sample water and sand, measuring indicators like DIC, or dissolved inorganic carbon , which directly measures the amount of carbon in the water. “These indicators are designed to measure the speed of the reaction that’s happening and actually look at the carbon as it is being removed from the atmosphere,” Green explained. “On the biological side, we’ll also be measuring the prevalence of various species that are there, both macroscopic and microscopic species, and looking at any changes in that as the experiment proceeds.” A nearly identical cove less than a quarter mile away will serve as a control cove. One concern is whether olivine could release nickel or other heavy metals into the water. Green told Fast Company that this nickel won’t be bioavailable, so it won’t harm marine species. But the pilot study will monitor metal concentrations to assess the real life impact to sand , water and local marine organisms. In addition to removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, Project Vesta hopes that more green beaches will reverse the ocean’s rising acidity. “The reaction that happens when olivine dissolves actually makes the ocean less acidic,” Green said. “ Ocean acidification is a major problem and is causing problems for a lot of species. It’s very clear that doing this will reduce acidity at the site where it’s done. And then there’s a hypothesis that that will actually be beneficial for local marine ecosystems. But we don’t know that yet for sure. We need to test it out.” Green beaches could also be a tourism draw. Papakolea on Hawaii’s Big Island is the world’s most famous green sand beach. It does more than alright for itself, tourist-wise. Future green beaches The Project Vesta folks hope that they’ll see a positive impact on their pilot beach within a year. If it’s successful, they’ll work with interested governments to expand the project. Green anticipates that members of the V20 — countries especially susceptible to climate change — may be especially receptive to green sand beaches. Island nations with lots of shoreline will be top candidates. If all went perfectly, how long would it take for green sand beaches to reverse climate change? Project Vesta scientists estimate they’ll need to dump ground olivine in 2% of the world’s shelf seas — the shallow coastal waters surrounding every continent — for the plan to work. “The scale of the problem is so big that any solution will also be largescale,” Green said. Project Vesta plans to find local or nearby sources of olivine to save financial and carbon costs of transporting the green rock. Even when factoring in the mining and transportation, the project claims it can capture 20 times the carbon it takes to make a green sand beach. Moving all these rocks will cost money. The credit card processing company Stripe is one of the project’s backers, in keeping with its pledge to spend $1 million a year on carbon removal technologies . Individuals can make donations of any size on Project Vesta’s website or support the project by buying a Grain of Hope necklace for $25. Fittingly, the jewelry sports a single grain of olivine suspended in a sand timer vial, symbolizing that time is running out on reversing climate change. + Project Vesta Images via Project Vesta

The rest is here: 
Can manufacturing green sand beaches save our planet?

Tiny living helps this family cut costs and find balance

June 30, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

When one tiny house is just a bit too tiny, why not get two? One single mom who flipped houses for a living decided to do just that, choosing not one but two tiny homes that she placed side-by-side to provide room for herself and her two daughters. This is an elegant solution for those who want to try tiny living on a slightly larger scale. One tiny home houses mom Amanda Lee’s bedroom, along with the living room, kitchen and bathroom. The second tiny home is split in half to house a bedroom and wardrobe area for each of Lee’s daughters. The homes are 168 and 219 square feet and connected with a large, covered porch . The porch increases the overall living space. Thanks to her two tiny homes, Lee is totally debt-free. Since she opted to live almost completely off-grid , her utility bills stay low. Thanks to her reduced living expenses, Lee bought herself plenty of time to spend with her children. She now works from her tiny home at her consulting business. Lee’s tiny homes were created by Aussie Tiny Houses, a company that specializes in creating beautiful, yet practical, tiny homes. The company’s website showcases several models, including designs that can sleep up to four people. The website also offers a few buying options. Homebuyers can opt for a lock-up, a shell or a turn-key tiny home that’s ready to be lived in. The design Lee chose is the gorgeous Casuarina 8.4. This tiny home is 26 feet long, 7.8 feet wide and 14 feet high. Casuarina’s features include stunning cathedral ceilings, full-height pantry storage in the kitchen and space for a washing machine. There’s also a full-height fridge in the kitchen and a bathroom with a storage loft. Casuarina’s design includes a steel frame, aluminum windows, insulated SMART glass , recessed LED lighting, USB charging points and waterproof vinyl floorboards. Buyers can also opt for various upgrades, including light dimmer switches, built-in Bluetooth ceiling speakers, skylights , external storage boxes and different kitchen appliance options. The tiny house movement has caught fire all over the world, as more people learn that they can make do with less living space. This approach certainly worked for Lee, whose smart solution gives her the freedom to work from home and focus on family. + Aussie Tiny Houses Via Tiny House Talk Images via Aussie Tiny Houses

Go here to read the rest:
Tiny living helps this family cut costs and find balance

Consumer Reports finds high arsenic level in Whole Foods bottled water

June 26, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

New Consumer Reports tests determined that some bottled water manufactured by Whole Foods contains potentially dangerous arsenic levels. Starkey Spring Water, which Whole Foods has been selling since 2015, contained at least triple the amount of arsenic as every other brand tested. Arsenic levels in the Starkey Spring Water ranged from 9.49 to 9.56 parts per billion. While this is within federal regulations stating that manufacturers must keep arsenic levels at or below 10 PPB, Consumer Reports experts believe that level is too high to keep the public safe. Related: EWG warns ‘forever chemicals’ are contaminating US drinking water at levels far worse than expected Consumer Reports and The Guardian worked together on a major project about Americans’ access to safe and affordable water . They found that bottled water is not always safer than tap water and noted irregularities between the ways in which the EPA regulates municipal water and the FDA oversees bottled water. While states can set individual standards for tap water, they have no jurisdiction over bottled water’s contaminants. For example, New Jersey and New Hampshire lowered their acceptable arsenic levels to 5 PPB to protect children. However, that rule only applies to tap water. “I think the average consumer would be stunned to learn that they’re paying a lot of extra money for bottled water, thinking that it’s significantly safer than tap, and unknowingly getting potentially dangerous levels of arsenic,” said Erik Olson, senior strategic director of health and food at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), according to The Guardian . Arsenic levels of 5 PPB or more were associated with children’s IQs measuring five or six points lower than average, according to a 2014 study published in the journal Environmental Health . Whole Foods has already faced a couple of lawsuits over Starkey Spring Water’s arsenic level, including one from a stage IV cancer survivor who said his condition makes him keenly aware of contaminants, and he wouldn’t have bought the bottled water had he known about the high amount of arsenic. An FDA spokesperson stressed that because arsenic occurs naturally, “it is not possible to remove arsenic entirely from the environment or food supply.” However, you may want to rethink your bottled water brand in favor of one with lower levels. Or, better yet, if you live in a place with good tap water, save some money and skip the ocean-bound plastic bottles. + Consumer Reports Via The Guardian Image via Suzy Hazelwood

See the rest here: 
Consumer Reports finds high arsenic level in Whole Foods bottled water

Explore eerie wonders at the Museum of Underwater Art

June 16, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Explore eerie wonders at the Museum of Underwater Art

Four years after its initial conception, Australia’s  Museum of Underwater Art  has finally opened to the public, becoming the first-ever underwater art museum in the Southern Hemisphere. Located off the coast of Townsville North Queensland in the central part of the Great Barrier Reef , the unique museum aims to strengthen the region’s position as a leader in reef conservation, restoration and education. World-famous underwater sculptor and environmentalist Jason deCaires Taylor conceptualized the first two installations — the Ocean Siren and Coral Greenhouse. As the inaugural sculpture of the Museum of Underwater Art, the Ocean Siren was conceived as an above-water beacon for raising awareness about  ocean conservation . The inspiration for the statue, as reported by CNBC, is 12-year-old Takoda Johnson, a “member of the local Wulgurukaba people, one of two traditional owners of the local land.” The sculpture reacts to live water temperature data from the Davies Reef weather station on the Great Barrier Reef by changing color depending on temperature variations.  Underwater and approximately 80 kilometers from shore, the John Brewer Reef “Coral Greenhouse” welcomes divers to the heart of the Greater Barrier Reef Marine Park with messages of reef conservation and restoration. The installation is the largest MOUA exhibit, weighing over 58 tons and filled with and surrounded by 20 “reef guardian” sculptures. All construction is made from stainless steel and pH-neutral materials to encourage  coral  growth. Related: This stunning underwater art museum is now open in the Maldives “MOUA offers a contemporary platform to share the stories of the reef, and the culture of its  First Nations  people, as well as spark a meaningful conversation and solution to reef conservation,” reads an MOUA press release emphasizing the museum’s many educational opportunities. The Ocean Siren and the Coral Greenhouse were completed as part of MOUA’s first phase; future installations include Palm Island and Magnetic Island. MOUA is estimated to generate over $42.1 million in annual economic output and create 182 jobs through the local tourism and conservation sectors. + Museum of Underwater Art Images via Jason deCaires Taylor

More: 
Explore eerie wonders at the Museum of Underwater Art

Scientists discover "pristine" fresh air in a unique location

June 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Scientists discover "pristine" fresh air in a unique location

It is difficult to think of a place on Earth where the air has yet to be contaminated by human activity. From metropolises like New York and large cities like Mumbai to even small villages, human activity has affected the natural air we breathe. However, a recent publication from  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences  shows that there is still one place on Earth with “pristine” air. The Southern Ocean , an area south of 40 degrees latitude, has been identified as one place on Earth where the air has not been contaminated. According to the publication, scientists have established that the air in this region is dominated by bacteria emitted in sea spray. Researchers used this bacteria as a “diagnostic tool” in the study. Essentially, findings from this study show that the air of the Southern Ocean is free of aerosols resulting from human activities. This makes the Southern Ocean one of the rare places where you can breathe pristine air. The study leading to this discovery was conducted by Colorado State University and used data collected by R/V Investigator, an Australian research ship. The R/V Investigator is operated by CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency. In sampling the air, the R/V team collected samples from the marine boundary, which is in direct contact with the ocean water. The exercise mainly included collecting airborne microbes and analyzing them with source tracking, DNA sequencing and wind back trajectories to establish their marine origins. According to Colorado State University Scientists, the results of the samples from the Southern Ocean were very different from those in subtropical and Northern Hemisphere oceans. In those waters , the air quality is largely influenced by anthropogenic aerosols from the Northern Hemisphere. As the R/V team found, the process of sampling the air over the Southern Ocean can be difficult. The air was so clear that the team had little DNA to work with. Given that the sampling process included DNA tracking, the team struggled to collect the data needed to conclude the study. The news of fresh air existing on a planet dominated by human activity is good news for all humanity. It shows us that there is hope in our conservation efforts. Even though human activities are causing harm to the environment, some gains can be attained if we keep pushing for a better environment. + Cosmos Images via Pexels

Original post:
Scientists discover "pristine" fresh air in a unique location

Orcas threatened by highly contagious respiratory virus, CeMV

June 1, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Orcas threatened by highly contagious respiratory virus, CeMV

Marine mammal conservationists warn of a contagious respiratory pathogen, cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV), that could potentially harm already  endangered  orca populations. Like the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 that is causing the current COVID-19 pandemic, CeMV similarly has high transmission and mortality rates. With orcas being highly social animals, an outbreak could threaten entire pod populations, in turn drastically affecting the ecosystem, since  orcas  are apex predators. According to  National Geographic , more than a million cetaceans ( whales , dolphins and porpoises) are eliminated each year through “bycatch [species caught unintentionally by fishermen], intentional killing, ship strikes, seismic surveys done for oil exploration, and naval sonar.” Oil spills are another risk, as are municipal and industrial waste polluting their marine environment. Chemicals accumulating in marine food chains are thereby ingested, leading to high toxicity levels that suppress cetacean immune systems. Related:  Federal agencies propose designated marine habitat to help protect Pacific humpback whales Worryingly,  Emerging Microbes & Infections  journal affirms CeMV as the pathogen posing the greatest risk of triggering widespread disease in cetacean populations worldwide. What’s worse, CeMV is highly contagious, capable of spreading between cetacean populations of whales, dolphins and porpoises. Cases of CeMV first appeared in cetaceans during the 1980s. So far,  Science Direct  acknowledges at least six distinct strains of CeMV — porpoise morbillivirus (PMV),  dolphin  morbillivirus (DMV), pilot whale morbillivirus (PWMV) and beaked whale morbillivirus (BWMV).  Interestingly,  Viruses  journal states that CeMV is part of a virus family — the morbilliviruses — which includes the measles virus in humans and primates, the rinderpest virus in cattle, the peste des petits ruminants virus in goats and sheep, the canine distemper virus in dogs and the phocine distemper virus in seals and walruses.  Meanwhile,  NOAA Fisheries  estimates that of 50,000 orcas worldwide, about 2,500 reside “in the eastern North Pacific Ocean…[with] Southern Residents in the eastern North Pacific… listed as endangered in 2005.” This pocket of orcas has garnered media attention for their dwindling numbers as their primary food source, chinook salmon, is depleted. Human-induced noise also interferes with echolocation, threatening the orcas’ normal behavior. Additionally, lingering polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), despite being banned for decades, persist in the  oceans , contaminating the food chain. As  The Guardian  revealed, “PCB concentrations found in killer whales can be 100 times safe levels and severely damage reproductive organs, cause cancer and damage the immune system.” Immuno-compromised orcas are left susceptible to pathogens like CeMV. Researchers ran simulations to see what would happen should the highly infectious CeMV enter a pod population. Models indicated 90% of the population would succumb. Biologist Michael Weiss of San Juan Island’s Center for Whale Research explained in a  Biological Conservation  journal study, “The social structure of this population offers only limited protection from disease outbreaks.” While immunization against measles in humans and canine distemper in pets has been successful, vaccines against CeMV for whales might not be deployed practically — unlike the morbillivirus vaccine program under development for endangered seals. A more viable solution may be to enhance the  conservation  of chinook salmon to minimize the chances of orca hunger and boost their immune systems. + KUOW and NPR Images via Pixabay

Read the rest here: 
Orcas threatened by highly contagious respiratory virus, CeMV

Living Building Challenge-targeted Watershed improves Seattles water quality

June 1, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Living Building Challenge-targeted Watershed improves Seattles water quality

Seattle-based design firm Weber Thompson has completed construction on Watershed, a mixed-use development that aggressively reduces its energy and water usage compared to conventional construction of the same size. Located in Seattle’s Fremont neighborhood, the inspiring project is one of a few pioneering buildings pursuing the city’s Living Building Pilot Program. The project will also be targeting the Materials, Place and Beauty petals toward Petal Certification from the International Living Future Institute’s Living Building Challenge. Set at the intersection of Troll Avenue and 34th Street, the seven-story Watershed building comprises approximately 5,000 square feet of ground-floor retail as well as 67,000 square feet of office space above. In addition to offering mixed-use appeal, the building also takes on an educational role. It includes informative signage in the landscape to help the public learn about the importance of clean water in the region as well as a digital dashboard in the lobby that displays real-time building performance data. To achieve the standards of Seattle’s Living Building Pilot Program, Watershed is required to reduce energy use by 25% and water use by 75% compared to a baseline building. Related: The net-zero Frick Environmental Center is officially one of the world’s greenest buildings Most impressively, Watershed features a comprehensive stormwater management plan that aims to capture and treat millions of gallons of runoff a year. Its cantilevered roof is engineered to capture 200,000 gallons of water a year that is used for on-site toilet flushing and irrigation. Stepped bio-retention planters also help retain and treat an additional 400,000 gallons of polluted stormwater runoff from the adjacent street and the Aurora Bridge annually prior to discharge in Lake Union. The building will eventually clean nearly 2 million gallons of toxic runoff from the Aurora Avenue Bridge annually as part of its three-phase Green Stormwater Infrastructure project. “Like every project we design, we’ve approached Watershed as an opportunity to create a building that positively impacts the broader community,” said Kristen Scott, architect and senior principal at Weber Thompson. “Watershed allows us to take what we’ve learned from some of our most ambitious sustainability projects to date and dig deeper to find new ways to showcase practical, achievable deep green design. Our goal is to inspire, through design, a stronger connection to place, community, and the environment around us.” The sustainable building also uses locally sourced materials, salvaged materials and state-of-the-art building energy controls and systems.  + Weber Thompson Images via Weber Thompson

Read more:
Living Building Challenge-targeted Watershed improves Seattles water quality

How Stripe’s ‘negative emissions’ team picked its first four carbon removal projects

May 28, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on How Stripe’s ‘negative emissions’ team picked its first four carbon removal projects

How Stripe’s ‘negative emissions’ team picked its first four carbon removal projects Heather Clancy Thu, 05/28/2020 – 01:14 Among the many notes to myself about potential follow-up stories lies my scribbled reminder to check in on online payment tech company Stripe’s pledge last year to put at least $1 million annually toward carbon removal activities. Last week, the company knocked that item off my checklist. After a “rigorous” search, Stripe disclosed that it will support four “high potential” carbon capture and storage projects — picked from 24 applications. The action was detailed in a blog by Ryan Orbuch, a member of the internal climate strategy team leading the push. “Our initial priority was working out how we could use our funds to have the biggest impact … Next, we want to make it ‘much’ easier for businesses to make these kinds of purchases, which, we hope, will begin to grow the market for carbon removal far beyond Stripe’s contribution,” Orbuch wrote in response to questions I submitted for this article. We want to make it ‘much’ easier for businesses to make these kinds of purchases. Here’s a rundown of the organizations that Stripe plans to support (presented alphabetically). If you do the math, you’ll see these projects (in aggregate) account for all of the company’s annual commitment. CarbonCure : The Canadian firm is using mineralized CO2 — aka calcium carbonate — in concrete. The CO2 is captured from industrial processes at plants creating things such as ethanol, fertilizer or cement. Stripe is supporting 2,500 tons at a price of $100 per ton. Charm Industrial : The San Francisco-based startup is working on an approach that injects bio-oil captured from biomass into geologic storage. Stripe is the company’s first customer; the project will support the capture of 416 tons at $600 per ton. Climeworks : The Swiss company, which uses renewable energy to capture carbon dioxide from the air, offers a sequestration approach called Carbfix that injects concentrated CO2 into basaltic rock formations. Stripe’s commitment is 322.5 tons, for which it will pay a price of $775 per ton. Ultimately, though, Climeworks has said it is working toward a long-term price of $100 to $200 per ton. Project Vesta : This organization, which hails from San Francisco, is focused on capturing CO2 within the ocean and storing it using olivine, a natural mineral. The idea is to embed the captured carbon dioxide with limestone on the seafloor. This is an extremely early-stage approach, and the company needs to test it for both safety and viability. Stripe’s commitment to help it capture 3,333.33 tons at $75 per ton will help it with both lab experiments and pilot beach projects. The criteria that Stripe used to assess its various options were pretty specific — they’re summarized below in the graphic.  In response to my question about which were the most important considerations, Orbuch said no project was a perfect match nor did the Stripe team expect any to be. It didn’t specifically set out to pick four (although the math worked out well, with roughly $250,000 committed to each.) What stood out was the projects’ particularly high potential as well as the fact that they work toward closing the gap of what’s available for companies to use as part of their carbon removal strategy. He wrote: “One thing that really stood out to us was how few existing projects even attempt to sequester carbon outside of the biosphere. There’s a particularly large gap in non-biospheric solutions (such a large gap, in fact, that we decided that we’d also support R&D for these kinds of projects going forward — to help increase ‘top of funnel’). While sequestration beyond the biosphere certainly wasn’t the only criteria we considered, this one became increasingly important to us.” We’ve been encouraged by how many businesses, including many Stripe users, have expressed interest in purchasing alongside us. Stripe didn’t make the decision about which projects to choose on its own. It consulted a number of advisers from academia (including scholars from Worcester Polytechnic, Heriot-Watt, Harvard and the University of Utah) and NGOs (Environmental Defense Fund and Carbon180).  One thing that intrigues me about Stripe’s interest in funding carbon removal is its potential to help other companies act. How cool would it be, for example, if Stripe could include an option in its online payment service that allows businesses to fund these sorts of projects directly, perhaps as a percentage of a transaction or as a flat rate that customers could add to a purchase? Shopify, another e-commerce merchant platform, has said that it eventually will allow its business customers to do this although it hasn’t offered much detail. When I asked Orbuch how Stripe customers might benefit from the projects announced last week, he basically said to stay tuned. “We’ve been encouraged by how many businesses, including many Stripe users, have expressed interest in purchasing alongside us, and we want to make it as frictionless as possible for them to do so,” he wrote. “More details to come at a later time.” In the call to action in its blog, Orbuch indicated that Stripe would like to create an ecosystem of “funders and founders” that can help it create an ecosystem of carbon removal opportunities to support that vision. Pull Quote We want to make it ‘much’ easier for businesses to make these kinds of purchases. We’ve been encouraged by how many businesses, including many Stripe users, have expressed interest in purchasing alongside us. Topics Carbon Removal Carbon Removal Carbon Capture Featured Column Practical Magic Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Project Vesta is focused on capturing CO2 within the ocean. Courtesy of Project Vesta Close Authorship

Excerpt from:
How Stripe’s ‘negative emissions’ team picked its first four carbon removal projects

Record high amount of microplastic found on seafloors

May 6, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Record high amount of microplastic found on seafloors

Researchers in a new U.K.-led study found a staggering volume of microplastics on the seafloor. At up to 1.9 million pieces on a single square meter, it’s the highest level on record. “We were really shocked by the volume of microplastics we found deposited on the deep seafloor bed,” Dr. Ian Kane of the University of Manchester, lead author of the study, told CNN. “It was much higher than anything we have seen before.” Researchers collected sediment samples from the Tyrrhenian Sea off  Italy’s  west coast. While  garbage  patches composed of plastic bags, bottles and straws are old news, scientists say the floating plastic doesn’t even account for 1% of the 10 million tons of plastic that wind up in the oceans annually. The new study seems to confirm what scientists have suspected: much of that plastic is deep down on the seafloor. The study, published in  Science ,  concludes that episodic turbidity currents, which are akin to underwater avalanches, rapidly transport microplastics down to the seafloor. Then, deep-sea currents work like conveyor belts, transporting microplastics along the bottom of the ocean and accumulating in what researchers called “microplastic hotspots.” Most of these microplastics are fibers from  clothes  and textiles that waste water treatment plants fail to filter out because they are so tiny. This is the first time  scientists have directly linked currents to plastic concentrations on the seafloor. The study’s authors hope this work will help predict future hotspots and the impact of microplastics on marine life. Unfortunately, though the plastics may be tiny, they can have a huge impact. “Microplastics can be ingested by many forms of marine life,” said Chris Thorne, oceans campaigner at  Greenpeace  U.K., “and the chemical contaminants they carry may even end up being passed along the food chain all the way to our plates.” Thorne has called for people to rethink “throwaway plastic.” + CNN Images via Oregon State University , Bo Eide , and Dronepicr

Read the original here:
Record high amount of microplastic found on seafloors

Sperry introduces shoes made with ocean plastic

March 27, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Sperry introduces shoes made with ocean plastic

Undoubtedly, one of the world’s most pressing issues is the massive amount of plastic waste that is clogging our oceans and waterways on a daily basis. Thankfully, some companies are converting this ocean plastic into useful products for the everyday consumer. Already well-known for its attractive boat shoes, American footwear company Sperry has just launched Bionic, a new type of eco-friendly boat shoe that is made with textiles spun from ocean plastic. Dating back to 1935, Sperry is an American shoe line that specializes in stylish and durable boat shoes. Its shoes are beloved by professional and amateur sailors, who also have a front-row seat to the shocking amount of plastic waste that is suffocating our planet’s water systems. Related: New line of men’s swimwear is made from recycled ocean plastic Working under its motto of “Look Good. Do Good.”, the footwear company has just unveiled a new line of eco-friendly boat shoes that are made out of recycled plastic waste. Working in collaboration with the teams from Water Keeper Alliance and Bionic Yarn , Sperry created the new Bionics collection, which features various boat shoes that are made with fabric spun from recycled plastic bottles. Once the plastic waste is collected from marine and coastal environments, it is then sent to be turned into eco-friendly yarn and fabric. Each shoe has the same rugged structure as Sperry’s regular collections, but the Bionic boat shoes feature that eco-friendly twist. In fact, according to Sperry’s calculations, each pair of shoes is made out of the equivalent of five recycled plastic bottles. Each item in the collection varies in cost, ranging from $30 to $100 per pair, with a range of styles and colors to choose from for both adults and children. + Sperry Images via Sperry

See original here: 
Sperry introduces shoes made with ocean plastic

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1958 access attempts in the last 7 days.