Cadence: magnetic travel capsules made of plastic waste from beach cleanups

March 22, 2021 by  
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Made from recycled, ocean-bound plastic, the Cadence magnetic, refillable containers offer a sustainable, convenient and stylish solution to single-use travel bottles. From shampoo to vitamins and skincare to jewelry, the customizable, honeycomb-shaped capsules stick together magnetically to keep everything organized in your travel bag. Perhaps the best part? Cadence uses a proprietary blend of recycled plastic specially designed to keep products secure and fresh. According to the company, at least 9 billion single-use travel containers and 6 billion silicone travel bottles will find their way to beaches and landfills throughout our lifetimes. Even worse, 80% of plastic on beaches ends up in the oceans , polluting ecosystems and harming wildlife. Related: The Ocean Cleanup launches sunglasses made from ocean plastic Cadence works with partner Envision Plastics, which employs local communities to collect plastic from beaches around the world. Today, the Cadence containers are made using 50% recycled material blended from ocean-bound plastic and reused scrap plastic from its own production, though it plans to bring that number up soon. The young company has assembled a team dedicated to finding the best way to create capsules made of 100% recycled plastic while keeping the product reusable and durable. Recycled ocean plastic aside, what sets these capsules apart from other travel containers is the fact that they are strong enough to be thrown around in your suitcase yet fashionable enough to look good on your desk or bathroom counter. The containers are designed to hold 16 milliliters/0.56 ounces of product and come in three colors: terracotta, lavender and sand. They are BPA-free , guaranteed leak-proof, dishwasher-safe and TSA-compliant as well. Buyers can choose a customized magnetic label when they purchase or choose from one of the preset icons or labels available (“cleaner,” “hand cream,” etc.). Each capsule is priced at $14, with the option to customize your own label for an additional $3. The company also offers discounts on preset bundles of six or seven. + Cadence Images via Cadence

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Cadence: magnetic travel capsules made of plastic waste from beach cleanups

Wildfires made air quality worse in 2020, despite lockdowns

March 22, 2021 by  
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Last spring, many environmentalists were cheering about the lockdowns’ side effects, such as reduced air pollution. While cars stayed parked and the air got cleaner for a few months, wildfires negated any lasting improvements. A new report from IQAir breaks down the winners and losers — mostly losers — in the air pollution battle. “You look at August through December, and you see the biggest impact on air quality is wildfires,” said Glory Dolphin Hammes with IQAir, as reported by Wyoming Public Media . In the U.S., those wildfires account for air pollution levels being higher in 2020 than in the preceding two years, despite all those people working from home and barely going anywhere. Related: Sandstorms and pollution create hazardous air quality in Beijing The annual World Air Quality Report uses the measure of PM2.5 averages. This means particulate matter of 2.5 micrometers or smaller. These tiny particles float in the air, making their way into our lungs and even bloodstream as we breathe, with often dire health consequences. The new report showed that the greatest increases in PM2.5 levels were in São Paulo (+5%), Melbourne (+1%) and Los Angeles (+1%). Wildfire season ravaged all three cities and the surrounding areas. In Sept 2020, 77 of the world’s most polluted cities were in the U.S. — 35 each in Oregon and California and seven in Washington. While fires were mainly responsible, Trump’s rollbacks of environmental regulations and lax attitude about the Clean Air Act didn’t help. Overall, 37 of the world’s most polluted cities are in South Asia. Going by the U.S. AQI measurements, 80% of cities in Bangladesh, 67% of cities in Pakistan and 32% of cities in India qualify as “unhealthy” or worse. The most polluted city in 2020 was Hotan in China, mainly due to major sandstorms. There were a few cities that came out as winners with improved air quality over the year. Singapore’s PM2.5 levels were down by 25%, Beijing’s by 23% and Bangkok’s by 20%. + IQAir Via Wyoming Public Media Image via Sippakorn

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Wildfires made air quality worse in 2020, despite lockdowns

Bottom trawling contributes more carbon emissions than air travel

March 22, 2021 by  
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The bottom trawling fishing technique is more harmful to the environment than previously thought, according to a new study. While it has long been known that this method captures fish indiscriminately, there was no available data on its carbon footprint. A recent study now shows that this method of fishing releases carbon emissions from ocean beds. The study, published in Nature , becomes the first to give a clear estimate of the carbon emissions caused by bottom trawling. In this technique, nets are dragged along the ocean floor, scraping for fish and other ocean creatures. This damages a significant part of fish habitats and releases CO2 that had been captured in the sea bed. Related: Super trawlers ravage UK’s protected waters amid pandemic The study broke the ocean into 50-square-kilometer blocks and used collected data to measure how much each square contributes to marine life in terms of fish stock, biodiversity and salinity among other aspects. Researchers estimate that bottom trawling releases about one gigaton of carbon emissions into the atmosphere every year, meaning this method of fishing alone contributes more carbon to the atmosphere than the aviation industry at pre-pandemic levels. This practice also impedes the ability of the sea bed to continue absorbing and storing carbon. On top of the pollution, damaged habitats for fish and indiscriminate capturing of species leads to diversity degradation. According to Enric Sala , lead author, marine biologist and National Geographic’s Explorer in Residence, the team had originally set out to find ways of discrediting this method of fishing to encourage those in the industry and governments to put an end to it. Scientists have been trying to petition governments against bottom trawling due to the effects it has on marine habitats. Bottom trawling is also one of the most  expensive methods of fishing  and the most destructive. Sala explained that most fishing operators that depend on bottom trawling rely on government subsidies to remain afloat. The team hopes this research will lead people to think twice about allowing bottom trawling to continue. + Nature Via Time Image via andrasgs

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Shahar Livne turns recycled ocean plastic into Balenciaga jewelry

February 22, 2021 by  
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Award-winning conceptual material designer Shahar Livne collaborated with fashion design company Balenciaga to create a new line of jewelry made from recycled ocean plastic . Inhabitat caught up with Livne to hear more about the process and inspiration behind the project. “The collaboration took inspiration from my ongoing speculative research project ‘Metamorphism,’ which investigates the future of plastics within the geological record of the Earth and the rebirth of it as a possible future semi-natural material I named ‘Lithoplast,’” Livne told Inhabitat. “In the  ‘Metamorphism’ project, I use different plastics, ocean plastics, or landfill-designated plastics, in developing the new jewelry collection we worked with both, mainly PP and HDPE.” The jewelry line will be available for purchase on the Balenciaga website in May 2021. Related: Nonprofit Washed Ashore crafts art and jewelry from ocean plastic The ocean plastic comes from Oceanworks , a worldwide marketplace for recycled plastic products and raw materials. The company sources plastic materials from all over the world, focusing mainly in Southeast Asia, where it says 60% of the world’s ocean plastic originates. The jewelry line, which consists of bracelets, earrings and rings, also uses marble waste material sourced from a marble processing company as well as landfill-derived plastic from recycling companies. “It was interesting for us to work with OceanWorks-provided materials since we wanted to find the most sustainable and social option,” Livne went on to say. “OceanWorks is a global network that collected plastics from different areas, among them the oceans, with the help of fishermen and other beach cleaning operations, and the connection seemed perfect.” The designer followed a similar process to her “Metamorphism” project, using heat and pressure to create a composite material. The material is then molded by hand into vintage -style shapes designed by Balenciaga, 3D-scanned to create a mold (in order to recreate a coherent style for the entire collection) and then finished by hand by Livne herself. + Shahar Livne Design Via Dezeen Images via Balenciaga and Shahar Livne Design

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How You Can Help Protect Our Oceans

November 4, 2020 by  
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A healthy ocean means healthy humans.We depend on the ocean … The post How You Can Help Protect Our Oceans appeared first on Earth 911.

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Maven Moment: Reuse Ideas for Old Pantyhose & Stockings

November 4, 2020 by  
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Years ago, pantyhose or stockings were must-haves for a working … The post Maven Moment: Reuse Ideas for Old Pantyhose & Stockings appeared first on Earth 911.

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Maven Moment: Reuse Ideas for Old Pantyhose & Stockings

Earth911 Podcast: Suntory’s Sustainable Business Goals With Clarkson Hine

November 4, 2020 by  
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Suntory, the Japanese beverage and distillery company famous for its … The post Earth911 Podcast: Suntory’s Sustainable Business Goals With Clarkson Hine appeared first on Earth 911.

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Earth911 Podcast: Suntory’s Sustainable Business Goals With Clarkson Hine

Air pollution climbing back to pre-pandemic levels

June 5, 2020 by  
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Last month, news media around the world heralded cleaner skies as a byproduct of the pandemic-induced quarantines. Alas, as lockdowns are lifted, air pollution is climbing back to pre-COVID levels in  China . Several European countries may soon follow suit. Concentrations of fine particles and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are back to where they were a year ago, according to data from the Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air (Crea). In early March, when China was suffering the worst of the  pandemic , the particle count was down by 34%, while nitrogen dioxide levels had fallen by 38%. Related: Air pollution could make COVID-19 more dangerous “The rapid rebound in air pollution and coal consumption levels across China is an early warning of what a smokestack industry-led rebound could look like,” said Lauri Myllyvirta, Crea’s lead analyst, in an article from  The Guardian . “Highly polluting industries have been faster to recover from the crisis than the rest of the economy. It is essential for policymakers to prioritise clean energy.” Wuhan, the pandemic’s ground zero, is still experiencing lower than usual nitrogen dioxide levels — 14% lower than last year. However, Shanghai’s NO2 level has soared to 9% higher than in 2019. Wood Mackenzie, an energy consultancy group, expects that the second quarter of 2020 will see China’s  oil  demand recover nearly to its normal level. European cities are still enjoying significant dips in air  pollution . The Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (Cams) shows that 42 of the 50 European cities it tracks had below-average NO2 levels in March. This pollutant, which is largely produced by diesel vehicles, dropped by 30% in Paris and London during the pandemic. How fast and how much European air pollution will rebound depends on the decisions of citizens, companies and government officials. “We do not know how people’s behaviour will change, for example avoiding public transport and therefore relying more on their own cars, or continuing to work from home,” Vincent-Henri Peuch, the director of Cams, told  The Guardian . Environmentalists hope that people will choose to  walk  and cycle more and drive their cars less. + The Guardian Images via Pexels

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Air pollution climbing back to pre-pandemic levels

Heimplanet celebrates 9 years of innovative inflatable tents

June 5, 2020 by  
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For almost a decade, Heimplanet has offered adventure-seekers an option for quick and easy tent set up in a variety of environments. The company first released a line of inflatable tents in 2011; now, with summer 2020 approaching, Heimplanet is reminding  outdoor  enthusiasts that there has never been a better time to go camping. Founders Stefan Clauss and Stefan Schulze Dieckhoff got the idea for the inflatable tents while on a trip to Portugal in 2003. Traveling along the coast to surf, the two often found themselves setting up their  camp  late at night and experiencing the inconveniences of conventional tents, such as fussing with poles in the dark and the rain. Related: The North Face unveils a geodesic tent that can withstand 60 mph winds The company offers four regular tent models that sleep one to six people and are built to tolerate 80 mph winds. The four models include Fistral, The Cave, Backdoor and Nias. Those seeking a  tent  developed for more extreme use can also splurge for the Maverick, which features room for up to 10 people and the capacity to handle wind speeds up to roughly 111 mph. The inflatable tents incorporate an “Inflatable Diamond Grid” consisting of an inflatable,  modular  cage-like structure that works as a geodesic dome and says goodbye to traditional tent poles. This design allows for high stability even in volatile weather conditions — the company’s Maverick model has even protected researchers and equipment in Antarctica. Thanks to the patented multi-chamber system, the tent’s entire frame is inflated and divided into separate chambers with one easy step that takes under one minute. This multi-chamber system gives the tent its stability, while also ensuring that if one air chamber is damaged the other chambers will keep the rest of the tent erect. Separate chambers can also be replaced or repaired individually, prolonging the life of the whole structure. Resistant double-layer construction combining an airtight thermoplastic polyurethane bladder on the inside and strong polyester fabric on the outside keeps the tent  insulated  and protected. Heimplanet is also part of the 1% For the Planet community, pledging 1% of sales to environmental preservation and restoration. The company has also recently implemented a “re-store” program that  restores  and repairs used models. + Heimplanet Images via Heimplanet, Luca Jaenichen, Sondre Forsell, Kevin Ellison, and Thibault Bevilacqua

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High-tech wetsuit protects divers and surfers from toxic elements in the oceans

November 6, 2019 by  
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With ocean waters being polluted at an astonishing rate, swimmers, divers and surfers are putting their lives at risk simply by entering the water. Vissla and Surfrider have collaborated on a slightly depressing solution aimed to keep water-lovers safe. The Rising Seas Wetsuit is a high-tech body suit that uses nanotechnology to block the absorption of any harmful pollutants in the water. Additionally, Nitrile pads on the stomach, elbows and knees help surfers maintain their grip on the board, even in seriously slimy conditions. Unfortunately, despite concerted efforts around the world to stave off any more damage, oceans are becoming suffocated with harmful bacteria, viruses, algal blooms, oil spills, trash — you name it. It is becoming common practice to close beaches due to the presence of harmful bacteria. Related: Yves Béhar recycles wetsuits and boat sails into ocean-friendly bags The innovative wetsuit is designed to allow divers and surfers to enjoy the waters, no matter how toxic they become . According to the design team, the Rising Seas Wetsuit includes a built-in bio-defense system that offers an impenetrable level of protection to the wearer while they are in the water. The futuristic wetsuit is made out of an Anti-R material that uses nanotechnology to block the absorption of harmful pollutants. The suit includes sensors that monitor the water conditions for bacteria levels, radiation and overall toxicity. All of this information is displayed on a digital LED display that is controlled by a touchscreen control panel on the forearm. The system allows swimmers and divers to access information easily and set preferences, such as alerts for extreme conditions. It also comes with satellite GPS services that provide location-based swell charts and current weather information. According to Vissla, the wetsuit is in the concept stages, and the team emphasized that this is a project they “never want to make a reality.” But its design is meant to draw attention to the extremely urgent issue of ocean pollution and rising sea levels . + Vissla + Surfrider Via Uncrate Images via Vissla

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