Zero Waste Bistro offers four days of sustainable food and design in NYC

May 21, 2018 by  
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Sustainability is on the menu at Zero Waste Bistro , a pop-up dining experience and installation that’s exploring how great design can drastically reduce the problem of restaurant food waste. Launched as part of NYCxDESIGN’s marquee event, WantedDesign Manhattan, the four-day Zero Waste Bistro — open May 19 through May 22, 2018 — is presented by the Finnish Cultural Institute in New York. The bistro introduces the philosophy behind Nolla, Finland’s first zero-waste restaurant in Helsinki. Recycled and recyclable elements are featured throughout the laboratory of food and design, from the construction materials to the tasting menu. Co-curated by Finnish designers Harri Koskinen and Linda Bergroth, the Zero Waste Food Bistro is helmed by Nolla chefs who have created a thought-provoking tasting menu. They use local and organic ingredients as well as commonly overlooked food byproducts, such as oyster mushrooms with doenjang miso and spent grain crumble. In addition to a dining experience, the pop-up event also includes workshops and talks centered on healthy materials, the circular economy and zero-waste fashion. “It’s time to rethink the way we live, the way we eat and the materials we use,” said Kaarina Gould, Executive Director of the Finnish Cultural Institute . “With Zero Waste Bistro, we’re proposing a future that reduces waste and helps to regenerate our natural environment, making it livable for generations to come; a future that’s already here if we make the right choices.” Zero Waste Bistro is constructed from high-performance recyclable components, including Durat surfaces and ReWall building materials, made entirely from upcycled packaging and industrial waste. All packaging is plastic-free, from Kotkamills’ takeaway cups made from plastic-free repulpable cartonboard to Sulapac packaging products constructed with sustainably sourced wood from Nordic forests. The bistro also prominently showcases iconic Nordic design with Alvar Aalto stools and lamps and Iittala tableware sourced from the Finnish Design Shop , the world’s largest online store for Nordic design. Related: Britain’s first zero-waste store is packaging-free and only sells ethical goods The Zero Waste Bistro’s tasting menu will be served at brunch, lunch and breakfast during the four-day event, which ends Tuesday. You can see a full listing of talks and workshops here . Reservations for the dining experience must be made in advance. + Zero Waste Bistro Images by Nicholas Calcott

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Zero Waste Bistro offers four days of sustainable food and design in NYC

Microplastics are killing fish faster than they can reproduce

June 8, 2016 by  
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There are 5 trillion pieces of plastic floating around in the Earth’s oceans, many of which are microplastics no larger than 5 mm large. These tiny particles are being gobbled up by fish and killing them faster than they can reproduce . A new study found that consuming the plastic pieces also slows fish down and interferes with their natural abilities to sense oncoming predators. The study , published in Science , observed perch larvae and their eating habits. When in the presence of microplastics, such as microbeads , the little guys actually preferred eating these harmful morsels over their usual meals of plankton. Ingesting the plastics slowed down development and interfered with the chemical signals the fish rely upon to sense when deadly predators are near. When pike were introduced into habitats where perch had been munching on microplastics, the perch were four times more likely to be eaten than those in a more natural environment. Related: Sea turtles face growing danger due to plastic trash in Australian waters Not only does ingesting plastic impede digestive systems with the fish, as well as with seabirds and other creatures, it seems there are longer-lasting effects on how the fish behave. All of these effects combined lead to increased mortality rates. In fact, all of the fish exposed to microplastics in the study were dead within 48 hours. Oona Lönnstedt, one of the study’s authors, told The Guardian , “If early life-history stages of other species are similarly affected by microplastics, and this translates to increased mortality rates, the effects on aquatic ecosystems could be profound.” Via  The Guardian Images via Flickr ( 1 , 2 )

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Microplastics are killing fish faster than they can reproduce

11 pieces of transforming furniture that work wonders for small spaces

May 21, 2016 by  
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Image via Exocet Exocet Chair by Stéphane Leathead at Design Arium Exocet is “a new kind of chair for all kinds of moments” — built for the natural curvatures of the human body, this ergonomically designed lounge chair can be transformed into a multitude of positions depending on your mood or activity. The patent pending design is available in several wood stains. Photo by Laura Mordas-Schenkein for Inhabitat The Collector’s Shelving System by Amuneal This luxurious modular shelving system is ideal for the smallest of spaces. The series of customizable shelves can be configured in a myriad of ways in a variety of wood stains or glass. Anchored by a solid brass machined hardware, the mechanical connections can be simply adjusted for any desired shelf spacing. We caught this chic display at International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF). Photo by Laura Mordas-Schenkein for Inhabitat Gali kitchenette by Ana Arana A video posted by Inhabitat (@inhabitatdesign) on May 14, 2016 at 9:21am PDT Ana Arana’s Gali kitchenette is like the Swiss Army Knife of culinary pursuits. Perfect for a kitchen-less studio apartment or tiny home, this all-in-one design is armed with everything you need to store, prep and cook food in a super-compact form. Photo by Laura Mordas-Schenkein for Inhabitat Urbano Loft Bed by Roberto Gil Roberto Gil’s new Casa Collection includes this instant bedroom and storage system. The 6-in-1 Urbano Loft Bed is a customizable system that includes closets, dressers, a desk, a fold-out guest bed, and storage stairs, all topped off with a king sized bed and nightstand. Made with an eco-conscious birch plywood, this ultra-efficient, space saving design is handcrafted in Brooklyn. A video posted by Inhabitat (@inhabitatdesign) on May 14, 2016 at 8:09am PDT Expanding Dining Table by Sifas This expanding outdoor glass dining table from Sifas seamlessly transforms to provide more seating in a snap. Its weather-proof swiveling center instantly creates more seating only when you need it. The elegant design is suitable for either indoor or outdoor use, and is a definite improvement from the antiquated design of traditional expanding dining tables. Photo by Yuka Yoneda for Inhabitat Balad h25 Lamps by Fermob French company Fermob recently released these handy wireless LED lanterns  that travel with you as you need them. The clever light can be hung from a lamp stand or detached and placed wherever you need extra lighting, whether it be indoor or outdoor. The best part is that they are completely wireless — after being charged on a USB cable, each light stays illuminated for 7-12 hours. A video posted by Inhabitat (@inhabitatdesign) on May 14, 2016 at 9:03am PDT Murphy Bed by Michelangelo Designs Michelangelo Designs demonstrated the hidden design of this Murphy bed at New York’s International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF). The graphic backdrop completely masks the fact that this couch and shelving unit hides a bed. Photo by Yuka Yoneda for Inhabitat 12-foot Tango Sectional Sofa Bed by Resource Furniture Here’s another fold out bed that instantly creates a comfortable night’s rest for guests. The 12-foot Tango sectional sofa by Resource Furniture easily unfolds into a spacious bed. It even includes a stylish headboard and the sofa’s arms double as nightstands. Photo by Yuka Yoneda for Inhabitat Expandable Goliath table by Resource Furniture Another micro-loft product by Resource Furniture is this expandable metal Goliath table , which hides neatly away as a compact desk and seats up to 10 when expanded to full length. Photo by Laura Mordas-Schenkein for Inhabitat Flip Tables by Mio Mio’s spunky Flip Tables can be configured in a myriad of ways. Comprised of four smart components, each layered side table can be flipped and combined in different heights, forms and colors, allowing the user to change up their environment depending on the situation. And you can rest easy knowing that all of the finishes are low-VOC , the wood is FSC-certified (Forest Stewardship Council), and the rest of the materials (including the steel bases) are both recycled and recyclable. Photo by Laura Mordas-Schenkein for Inhabitat Slide Shelf System by Mio The makers from Mio also designed this eco-modular shelving system that shape-shifts depending on your needs. The collection of sturdy brackets, shelves and bins allows you to add extra storage at a moments notice. Want to see more trending designs from New York Design Week ? Check out our full coverage right here .

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11 pieces of transforming furniture that work wonders for small spaces

Shape-shifting Exocet Chair conforms to the body in dozens of ways

May 19, 2016 by  
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Handcrafted from birch wood, the transforming lounger is available in several veneers including White Oak, Cherry, Walnut, Maple and Mozambique. Spinning the Exocet ‘s rotating steel axis instantly adjusts the seat depending on your personal activity or comfort level. Whether lounging, reading, napping, or entertaining, this patent-pending design is fashioned for a myriad of situations. RELATED: 11 pieces of transforming furniture that work wonders for small spaces When asked how the design came to be, Exocet’s designer Stéphane Leathead told Inhabitat: “I was looking for a way to design a chair that would allow you to adjust it for your own comfort, based on our own specific different proportions. I couldn’t find anything on the market, and I said there must be a way to design a chair that would allow this…so I said there’s no choice but to have a rotating axis to allow you to angle to the proper [position]…Egonomically nature is good for that, that kind of drop shape guided me. It’s very organic, it looks nicer, and it’s more pleasant. There’s not one straight line on our body — how come we design straight line chairs?”   Leathead explains that the elegant, ergonomic Exocet Chair lets everyone become a designer. He says, “You design the chair you like — you become the designer.” While this version is better for indoor use (because the wood would warp in rain), Leathead is also looking into an outdoor version, as well as custom cushions to enhance the comfort level. The limited edition design was recently on display at NYCxDesign  and has received multiple awards, including the 2015 Gold A’Design Award in Milan, the 2015 Coup de Coeur Sidim Award in Montreal, and the 2015 K-Design Award in Seoul. + Exocet Chair

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Shape-shifting Exocet Chair conforms to the body in dozens of ways

Antibiotic resistant bugs could kill 10 million people each year by 2050

May 19, 2016 by  
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Economist Lord Jim O’Neill recently released a report detailing the costs of not fighting antibiotic resistance . Bacteria resistance to drugs appears to have worsened, and O’Neill’s report revealed that by 2050, 10 million people every year could perish from drug-resistant bugs if we don’t take action. O’Neill suggested that pharmaceutical companies should be required to invest in research to develop new, effective antibiotics . He also said doctors should stop dishing out antibiotics unless a person truly needs them, discerned through rapid testing. If a rapid test doesn’t exist, it must be developed and subsidized for developing countries. Related: New super-strain of E. coli resists all known antibiotics “I find it incredible that doctors must still prescribe antibiotics based only on their immediate assessment of a patient’s symptoms, just like they used to when antibiotics first entered common use in the 1950’s,” O’Neill said . “We must stop treating antibiotics like sweets, which is what we are doing around the world today.” O’Neill didn’t stop there. He attacked the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in the food industry, particularly in the United States, although the practice is widespread. According to The Guardian, one of “the antibiotics of last resort,” Colistin, was recently found to be ineffective in China, where it had been given to farm animals. O’Neill said, “In some parts of the world, probably in the largest emerging economies and and almost definitely in the United States, the use of antibiotics in animals is greater than in humans and that means the misuse is probably higher too.” Implementing O’Neill’s suggestions wouldn’t be cheap. In his report, he said enacting his proposals could cost $40 billion over the course of 10 years. But inaction comes with a heftier price tag. O’Neill estimates the cost to society to be potentially $100 trillion every year. Even worse would be the cost in millions of human lives. Via The Guardian Images via Pixabay and Wikimedia Commons

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Antibiotic resistant bugs could kill 10 million people each year by 2050

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