Beer made from recycled bread is coming to the U.S.

May 5, 2017 by  
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A brewery in London is taking a bite out of food waste . Launched last year, Toast makes its beers from surplus fresh bread, including the heel ends of loaves, that would otherwise feed the landfill. Toast combines the bread with malted barley, hops, yeast, and water to craft its lagers, which are sold to raise money for charity. A full 100 percent of its profits, in fact, goes to Feedback , a nonprofit working to end wasted food across the globe. It is the rare bakery that doesn’t have a ton of leftover bread at the end of the day—more, perhaps, than any food bank can distribute. In fact, as much as one-third of loaves likely head directly from the oven to the landfill. Related: Quebec food waste program to rescue 30.8 million pounds of food Although food waste is somewhat of a modern concern, brewing tipple from bread isn’t. Toast uses a recipe based on a formula that hails from 4,000 B.C., when people in Mesopotamia and Egypt made a “divine drink” from bread baked from emmer wheat. Now, Toast wants to take its show on the road, specifically to New York City, where it hopes to produce an American pale ale by the Fourth of July. Related: British supermarket chain launches trucks powered by food waste “NYC bakeries are already knocking down our door to bring surplus loaves directly from their ovens to the brewery?,” it wrote on its crowdfunding page. “This campaign will guarantee our ability to produce 100 [barrels] of beer in NYC—with that, we’ve got a social business on our hands!” Cheers to that! + Toast on Indiegogo + Toast Via Treehugger

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Beer made from recycled bread is coming to the U.S.

Black Magic home sits lightly in a mountain oasis

May 5, 2017 by  
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Nature lovers will feel right at home with Black Magic. Designed by Colorado-based Rowland + Broughton , this glass-clad mountainside home embraces the landscape and gives homeowners the impression of sitting among the trees even when indoors. Coupled with Snowmass, Colorado’s lush surroundings, the contemporary dwelling’s clean lines and airy feel appears like a “penthouse living in a mountain oasis.” When Rowland + Broughton was asked to design the Black Magic house from scratch, they created the self-imposed restriction to minimize site disturbance as much as possible. Thus the project’s first step began with careful siting and working with existing topography to reduce site excavation. The project is rewarded with close proximity to native grasses and mature fir, oak, and aspen trees. Related: Prefab Pyrenees cabin minimizes site impact and building costs Black Magic is clad in a black metal corrugated skin that contrast with the leafy mountainside. Large windows punctuate the black metal facade to frame views of the outdoors and bathe the white oak-lined interior in natural light. The Black Magic home spans two levels with two bedrooms, a storage area, garage, and laundry room on the ground floor. The best views in the home are enjoyed from the upper floor, which contains the master suite on one end and an open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living room on the other. The living room opens up to a south-facing outdoor deck. + Rowland + Broughton Via Dezeen Images via Rowland + Broughton

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Black Magic home sits lightly in a mountain oasis

Worlds first LEED Platinum police station generates more energy than it consumes in Cincinnati

May 5, 2017 by  
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Serving the community goes hand in hand with serving the environment at this police station in Cincinnati. The Ohio city is home to the world’s first freestanding net-zero energy police station that’s also the first of its kind to earn LEED Platinum certification. Designed by local firm emersion DESIGN , the Cincinnati District 3 Police Station Headquarters is a beautiful facility that not only produces as much energy as it consumes, but also beautifies the community with public art and rainwater. Unveiled in July 2015 in the city’s Westwood neighborhood, the 39,000-square-foot District 3 Police Station Headquarters houses nearly 200 employees. Forty geothermal wells and a 330-kW solar array power the energy-efficient building, which consumes half the power used by traditionally built facilities of the same size. Since the building consumes less energy than it generates—the energy use intensity is 28 kBtu per square foot—the building is expected to save the city a significant amount of taxpayer money over the years. Related: BIG unveils plans for NYPD’s first-ever green-roofed police station The net-zero energy building was also designed with considerable community input, from the new station’s location to the selection of public art. As part of the state’s 1 Percent Art Program, the police station includes an LED art installation that tells the story of the district’s 14 neighborhoods. Generous amounts of glazing clad the station and create a sense of transparency with the community. The landscaping around the building incorporates native plantings and includes beautiful stormwater management design, such as rainwater gardens and a stone ‘river’ bioswale. + emersion DESIGN

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Worlds first LEED Platinum police station generates more energy than it consumes in Cincinnati

Times Square now has double the public space

April 20, 2017 by  
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The most visited destination in the United States now has double the public space—an amazing feat unimaginable just ten years ago. When New York City temporarily closed part of Broadway Street at Times Square to traffic and created a pedestrian plaza in 2009, many dismissed the experiment as foolish. But the removal of cars in favor of public space proved an incredible success and with the pilot project turned permanent, Times Square was forever reinvented. Today, the city announced the official completion of their reconstruction project: a 2.5-acre permanent pedestrian-only public plaza on Broadway designed by architecture firm Snøhetta. With an average of 45 million visitors each year—many of who look up at the billboards instead of the path in front—Times Square is notorious for its pedestrian traffic. Before the addition of pedestrian plazas, the exposure to vehicular traffic, slow-moving pedestrians , and small sidewalks made visiting Times Square an unpleasant, polluted, and sometimes unsafe experience. However, with the re-direction of vehicular traffic and the return of public space to pedestrians, Times Square dramatically transformed into a welcoming civic space. Pedestrian injuries decreased by 40 percent and crime in the overall area decreased by 20 percent. Air pollution has even fallen by as much as 60 percent. This week marks the official opening of the completed Times Square reconstruction project, designed by Snøhetta and completed in 2016. Together with the NYC Department of Transportation , Department of Design and Construction, and the Times Square Alliance, the architecture firm carved 2.5 acres of pedestrian space out of a project site known as the “Bowtie” in the heart of the Times Square Theater District, bounded by Broadway and 7th Avenue between 42nd and 47th streets. The first phase of the pedestrian street opened to the public in spring 2014. An overwhelming majority of New Yorkers and visitors agreed that the plaza has enhanced Times Square and made it a more pleasant place. Related: Snøhetta Selected to Design A New Car-Free Times Square “Conceived as a project whose success would be measured not only by its new aesthetic but also the long-term physical, psychological and economic benefits on its community, the reinvention of Times Square stands as a model for how the design of our urban landscapes can improve health and well-being of its users while providing an important stage for public gathering,” said Craig Dykers, Architect and Founding Partner of Snøhetta. The Bowtie is designed to accommodate multiple speeds of pedestrian circulation—330,000 people move through Times Square on average every day—using subtle design cues. Street furniture and other design elements also create a welcoming space to linger. Conceived as “an outdoor room right in the heart of Manhattan,” the plaza includes ten fifty-foot-long granite benches plugged into the city’s power grid and connected to 400-amp, 200-amp, and 20-amp power sources. The reconstruction project also allowed for major overhaul of outdated infrastructure, including the sewer lines below. + Snøhetta Images © Michael Grimm

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Times Square now has double the public space

"City of Dreams" pavilion on NY’s Governors Island will be made from 300,000 recycled cans

March 14, 2017 by  
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Every summer, Figment NYC selects a team to design and erect a temporary “City of Dreams” pavilion for its annual arts festival on Governors Island , a 172-acre plot of land in New York Harbor, just below Manhattan’s southernmost tip. Co-hosted by the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects and the Structural Engineers Association of New York , the competition is as much a meditation on the future of New York City as it is a call for novel and sustainability-oriented approaches to design. This year’s winning entry, dubbed “Cast & Place,” rehabilitates waste from eyesore to resource. The brainchild of Team Aesop, a group that consists of Josh Draper from PrePost / RPI-CASE , Lisa Ramsburg and Powell Draper from Schlaich Bergermann Partner , Edward M. Segal from Hofstra University , and Max Dowd from Cooper Union , the trellised structure will deploy roughly 300,000 community-sourced aluminum cans, though not in a way most of us would expect. A defining characteristic of the pavilion is its filigree-like pattern, which Team Aesop plans to create by making clay casts that they’ll allow to dry—and crack—inside a furnace. The cans will then be melted down and drizzled into the channels, creating rivulets of molten aluminum that turn solid as they cool. The designers originally wanted to use soil dredged from the East River, but scheduling difficulties forced them to look elsewhere. Team Aesop now has its eye on excavated earth from a construction site in Flushing, Queens, which it will frame with reclaimed wood from Big Reuse , an organization that turns demolition debris into building materials. Light but strong, the resulting pieces can be assembled into structures for both shelter and play. Flanking the standing structure will be “rain-soaked reflecting pools of dredge” that wear away to reveal the pavilion’s framework. They’re meant to foment contemplation, inducing “meditations on time, materiality, and the sources of our city,” Draper and company said. But Team Aesop can’t pay for everything alone. To raise funds, the designers have launched a Kickstarter campaign , with rewards that range from a pop-up postcard model of the pavilion to one of the 36 panels they eventually hope to make. Donors to the project can pride themselves as forward thinkers. Not only will they be helping shepherd a new fabrication method, but they’ll also be “enabling a conversation about the future,” Team Aesop said. “In a time of climate crisis, we need to rethink how we use energy and resources,” the designers added. “We asked ourselves: What if we used waste to make this pavilion? How could we find value in the valueless? Join our journey and become part of the conversation.” + Cast & Place: City of Dreams Pavilion on Kickstarter Photos by Schlaich Bergermann Partner/PrePost/Edward M. Segal/Max Dowd

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"City of Dreams" pavilion on NY’s Governors Island will be made from 300,000 recycled cans

Check out the vibrant outdoor art gallery coming to NYC’s High Line park

February 24, 2017 by  
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High Line Art , the arm of Friends of the High Line that manages its public art projects, reviewed more than 50 proposals before shortlisting 12 for the inaugural Plinth commissions. The artists, who hail from all corners of the globe, include veterans such as Haim Steinbach and Charles Gaines, mid-careerists like Matthew Day Jackson and Cosima von Bonin, and emerging talents such as Minerva Cuevas, Lena Henke, and Jonathan Berger. “The High Line Plinth will provide artists with an opportunity to work on a larger scale than ever before possible on the High Line, and to engage with the breathtaking vistas that open up around this new site,” said Cecilia Alemani, director and chief curator of High Line Art. “As a new landmark to this space, the High Line Plinth will create a new symbol of this incredible nexus of horticulture, art, and public space in the ever-evolving metropolis that is New York City.” For the 2.3 million visitors the High Line receives annually, the Plinth provides an opportunity unlike any other: “free, world-class artwork 365 days a year,” according to Robert Hammond, co-founder and executive director of Friends of the High Line. “The High Line Plinth will expand the program’s impact by creating a one-of-a-kind destination for public art on the Spur, a new section of the park with even more space for public programming and dynamic horticulture,” he said. The Fourth Plinth has served as a stage for subversive, politically charged, or otherwise controversial pieces that have fueled debate. The High Line Plinth is expected to be no different, Alemani said. Ascent of a Woman , an entry from New York’s Lena Henke, is a “singular, gigantic, upturned” breast that will slowly erode in the face of the elements. The breast’s outer layer of soil, sand, and clay will eventually give way to new forms cast into the inner mold. Unapologetically sensual, the work pits the city and the body in a “surreal entanglement … challenging New York City’s rational and modernist approach to public space.” Los Angeles–based Sam Durant proposes an abstract representation of an unmanned Predator drone, rotating like a wind vane atop a 20-foot column. In the shadow of the aircraft, visitors may imagine the specter of surveillance casting a creeping, growing influence across the world. Paola Pivi, who was born in Italy but lives and works in Anchorage, Alaska, suggests a 20-foot-high reproduction of the Statue of Liberty wearing an inflatable cartoon-style mask in the guise of someone who has gained his or her freedom in the United States, or seeks to do so. The stories of the individuals featured would be made available to visitors online. Less polarizing, perhaps, is Londoner Jeremy Deller’s slide, which takes the form of a giant chameleon. “There is something magical about chameleons; they can do things that we can only dream of,” he explained. To start with, High Line Art wants to whittle the proposals down to two—you can vote for your favorites , or, if you prefer, recommend something else altogether. “I am excited to work with artists who think critically about the meaning of public space and public life, and create artworks that not only respond to the site, but also spark conversations among a wide audience,” Alemani added. + The High Line Plinth + The High Line Via Curbed

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Meet Adam Sobel, the food truck chef who’s taking vegan food to the streets

July 19, 2016 by  
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Adam Sobel is a man with a mission: since 2010, he’s been roaming the streets of New York City with his food truck, the Cinnamon Snail, sharing mouthwatering vegan food on the street and growing a new audience for delicious, plant-based food. Our family and parenting site, Inhabitots , had the opportunity to interview him recently about his experiences as a chef and his new cookbook . The interview is also chock full of delicious-looking recipes for things like Fried Onion Blintzes and Apple Sauce . Nom Nom. Here’s a sneak peak:   Inhabitots:  Has your clientele changed over the years? Did it take people a while to warm up to the concept of vegan street food? How do you entice non-vegans or non-vegetarians to give Cinnamon Snail a try? Sobel : I think when people see a line down the block and see a big display case full of extra tempting donuts and pastries, people just get really excited, whether they realize the food is vegan or not.  A lot has changed over the last six to seven years that we have been in operation. More and more mainstream people are experimenting with meatless Mondays, or eating more plant-based food as a part of their varied diet.  There is a lot less of a cultural stigma against vegan cuisine now than there was when we started. I like to think we had some small hand in helping shape the mainstream culture’s idea of vegan food, but maybe that’s taking it too far. For more of the interview (and a few signature mouth-watering recipes you can prepare at home), follow the link below.

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Meet Adam Sobel, the food truck chef who’s taking vegan food to the streets

Elegant ACERA elevates the everyday travel mug into art

July 19, 2016 by  
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Stainless steel is a popular choice for reusable travel mugs, but ceramic also has its charms. Taiwan ceramic brand ACERA gives the everyday travel mug a chic upgrade with One-O-One, a handcrafted and hand-decorated opaque ceramic cup that comes in alternate smooth and textured surfaces. The stylish travel mug was recently awarded the prestigious Red Dot Award: Best of the Best . + ACERA The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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Elegant ACERA elevates the everyday travel mug into art

Intellibins helps you find recycling bins on city streets

March 28, 2016 by  
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Have you ever found yourself wandering around a city trying to find a recycling bin, only to have to stow that plastic food container in your backpack because you don’t want to pollute? Many American cities aren’t exactly ahead of the game when it comes to public recycling — they aren’t offered on every corner. But one startup is on a mission to facilitate recycling on city streets, simply by helping people find the bins. Their location-based mobile app called Intellibins helps you find the nearest recycling bin with step-by-step navigation, so you can always recycle no matter where you are. The current Intellibins app is available on iPhone and Android for all five boroughs of New York City. Let’s hope the idea catches on in other cities soon. + Intellibins The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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VIDEO: See inside NYC’s first official micro apartments complete with transforming furniture

March 22, 2016 by  
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After just three years of planning and construction, NYC’s first official micro apartment building is getting ready to open its doors. Inhabitat recently got a sneak peek inside one of the compact units at Carmel Place, complete with transforming furniture, plenty of daylight and ample built-in storage. Read on for our video tour to check it out for yourself. READ MORE >

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