Cool micro studio in Budapest makes the most out of 344 square feet

September 25, 2017 by  
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Space-efficient design is of the utmost importance when creating livable tiny spaces like this beautiful 344-square-foot studio located in Budapest, Hungary. The compact space was designed by Studio Bunyik for the homeowner who likes to socialize at home. Using bespoke furniture pieces by local company Architecture Uncomfortable Workshop to designate individual spaces, the design team shrewdly created an open floor plan that manages to make the most out of the small interior. The micro space was outfitted with all of the comforts of home, including a fully-equipped kitchen and dining area, study, and lounge. The spaces are all divided with singular furniture pieces , creating a comfy and functional living space that doubles as an office during the day and entertaining space on the weekend. Related: At Just 150 Sq. Ft., This Tiny Real Estate Office is One of NYC’s Smallest Workplaces The wooden furniture was all hand crafted by a local furniture company, The Architecture Uncomfortable Workshop. All of the furniture was designed to give the homeowner a space for all of his hobbies and passions as well as functional pieces like his work station or wooden ladder that leads to the sleeping loft. + Studio Bunyik + Architecture Uncomfortable Workshop Via Dwell Photography via Bence Farkasinszki  

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Cool micro studio in Budapest makes the most out of 344 square feet

Artist Ai Wewei to install fences around 300 sites in New York City

August 22, 2017 by  
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Ai Weiwei is returning to New York City – and he’s planning to install fences around 300 sites in one of his largest public art projects to date. According to the artist, “Good Fences Make New Neighbors” is a reaction to “a retreat from the essential attitude of openness” in American politics. The exhibition opens on October 12 and it was commissioned by the Public Art Fund to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the organization. All in all, the project will comprise 10 major fence-themed installations in addition to scores of smaller works. Said Nicholas Baume, the Public Art Fund’s director and chief curator, “This is the most ambitious that we’ve undertaken since I’ve been here. Certainly, it’s the most distributed throughout the city.” In the past, the Public Art Fund commissioned major artists like Alexander Calder and Sol LeWitt to produce thought-provoking masterpieces. Related: Miami Artist Smashes $1 Million Vase by Chinese Dissident Ai Weiwei “In Protest” Ai Weiwei was inspired by Robert Frost’s poem “Mending Wall” to build the fences – and they will be located in multiple boroughs, including Manhatten , Queens, and Brooklyn. Some of the sites include Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Queens, the Doris C. Freedman Plaza, and the Cooper Union building in Manhattan. + Good Fences Make Good Neighbors + Ai Weiwei Via New York Times Images via Ai Weiwei and Public Art Fund

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Artist Ai Wewei to install fences around 300 sites in New York City

Floating Cloud lamp adds levitating magic to any room

August 14, 2017 by  
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Take your home to new atmospheric levels with this incredible floating cloud lamp. Designed by Richard Clarkson Studio and Crealev , Floating Cloud is a magnetically levitating ambient lamp that adds a magical touch to any room it hovers in. The designers just announced a limited production run of these unique and fluffy lamps—read on for more details and to see the cloud come alive. Floating Cloud is the latest iteration of an ongoing collaboration between Richard Clarkson Studio’s cloud-themed designs and Crealev’s innovative levitation technology. Made from PETG and hypoallergenic polyester fiber, the fluffy cloud-like mass floats approximately 2.75 inches off its base using magnetic levitation. The Cloud is entirely wireless and the base is powered with a rechargeable lithium ion battery. The cloud spins and bobs side-to-side for a “more realistic atmospheric experience,” while hidden sound-reactive RGB LEDs create the powerful illusion of a storm cloud with lightning. To reduce weight and size, the Floating Cloud does not include a speaker, however it will react to existing sound systems and voices. The Cloud flashes to the beat of the music in four different styles using an embedded microphone. An infrared remote controls a range of ambient lamp modes from white to colored versions. Related: This water-filled lamp makes it rain in your home “The Cloud is held in place using both rare earth magnets, electromagnets, and a location sensor,” write Richard Clarkson Studio. “There is a discrete infrared locating beam in the center of the Cloud, which, if obstructed by an object (such as a hand) will result in the Cloud “falling off” it’s levitating balance point. In such an event the Cloud has a soft felt bottom to cushion the fall. To return the Cloud to its floating position, use your fingers to pry the Cloud off the base and with two hands hold the Cloud roughly in position, slowly move the Cloud from side to side until you feel it ‘lock’ in place.” The studio has released a limited 100-unit production run of the Floating Cloud, available on their website for $4,620 USD . + Richard Clarkson Studio

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Floating Cloud lamp adds levitating magic to any room

Elon Musk just announced he got verbal approval to build a New York to DC hyperloop

July 20, 2017 by  
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Elon Musk just announced that the New York City to Washington D.C. hyperloop is happening. Taking to Twitter, Musk said that he has received verbal approval to build an underground hyperloop, with at least a dozen entrance/exits in each city. Once completed, riders will be able to travel from city center to city center in under 30 minutes. Just received verbal govt approval for The Boring Company to build an underground NY-Phil-Balt-DC Hyperloop. NY-DC in 29 mins. — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) July 20, 2017 Musk added – again, on Twitter – that there is still work to do to get official approval, but he is “optimistic that will occur rapidly.” The project will be built by The Boring Company at the same time as the Los Angeles hyperloop. Still a lot of work needed to receive formal approval, but am optimistic that will occur rapidly — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) July 20, 2017 Related: Hyperloop One exhibits exciting first images of full-scale test track Right now it takes four hours to drive between New York City and Washington DC, or three hours by train. The hyperloop would dramatically decrease transportation time, though specifics on how it would all would are still sketchy – and, of course, verbal approval is a far cry from having signatures on the dotted line. No doubt Musk will update us as things develop. via Inverse

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Elon Musk just announced he got verbal approval to build a New York to DC hyperloop

Futuristic solar fabric canopy reacts to heat, sunlight, and movement

June 28, 2017 by  
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MoMA PS1 just completed one of its most experimental and coolest installations to date. The Long Island City-based contemporary art museum wrapped up construction on Lumen, an immersive and interactive installation made with solar-active canopies that glow at night. Designed by Jenny Sabin Studio , Lumen reacts like a living entity to light, heat, and movement, creating different engaging environments from day to night. Set to open to the public Thursday, June 29, Lumen will be on view in MoMA’s PS1 courtyard during summer 2017. The futuristic canopy was selected as the winner of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s annual Young Architects Program that challenges emerging designers to create a temporary, outdoor installation addressing environmental issues and forward-thinking design. Jenny Sabin Studio designed Lumen with over a million yards of digitally knitted fiber made from recycled photo-luminescent textiles that absorb solar energy during the day and emit glowing hues of blue, pink, and purple at night. The cellular canopies are stretched overtop the courtyard and give the space an extraterrestrial vibe. Suspended from the canopy like stalactites are 250 tubular structures. A hundred robotically woven recycled spool stools are scattered throughout the courtyard like stalagmites. Related: Futuristic canopy made of knitted solar panels wins 2017 Young Architects Program at MoMA During the day, the canopy’s integrated misting system sprays water to cool visitors in hot weather. Lumen’s use of mist for cooling and its multicolored glowing backdrop at night creates a dynamic setting for the 20th season of Warm Up , MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series. MoMA PS1 writes: “Socially and environmentally responsive, Lumen’s adaptive architecture is inspired by collective levity, play, and interaction as the structure transforms throughout the day and night, responding to the density of bodies, heat, and sunlight. The result of collaboration across disciplines, Lumen applies insights and theories from biology, materials science, mathematics, and engineering—integrating high-performing, formfitting, and adaptive materials into a structure where code, pattern, human interaction, environment, geometry, and matter operate together.” + Jenny Sabin Studio Images by Pablo Enriquez

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Futuristic solar fabric canopy reacts to heat, sunlight, and movement

Beer made from recycled bread is coming to the U.S.

May 5, 2017 by  
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A brewery in London is taking a bite out of food waste . Launched last year, Toast makes its beers from surplus fresh bread, including the heel ends of loaves, that would otherwise feed the landfill. Toast combines the bread with malted barley, hops, yeast, and water to craft its lagers, which are sold to raise money for charity. A full 100 percent of its profits, in fact, goes to Feedback , a nonprofit working to end wasted food across the globe. It is the rare bakery that doesn’t have a ton of leftover bread at the end of the day—more, perhaps, than any food bank can distribute. In fact, as much as one-third of loaves likely head directly from the oven to the landfill. Related: Quebec food waste program to rescue 30.8 million pounds of food Although food waste is somewhat of a modern concern, brewing tipple from bread isn’t. Toast uses a recipe based on a formula that hails from 4,000 B.C., when people in Mesopotamia and Egypt made a “divine drink” from bread baked from emmer wheat. Now, Toast wants to take its show on the road, specifically to New York City, where it hopes to produce an American pale ale by the Fourth of July. Related: British supermarket chain launches trucks powered by food waste “NYC bakeries are already knocking down our door to bring surplus loaves directly from their ovens to the brewery?,” it wrote on its crowdfunding page. “This campaign will guarantee our ability to produce 100 [barrels] of beer in NYC—with that, we’ve got a social business on our hands!” Cheers to that! + Toast on Indiegogo + Toast Via Treehugger

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Black Magic home sits lightly in a mountain oasis

May 5, 2017 by  
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Nature lovers will feel right at home with Black Magic. Designed by Colorado-based Rowland + Broughton , this glass-clad mountainside home embraces the landscape and gives homeowners the impression of sitting among the trees even when indoors. Coupled with Snowmass, Colorado’s lush surroundings, the contemporary dwelling’s clean lines and airy feel appears like a “penthouse living in a mountain oasis.” When Rowland + Broughton was asked to design the Black Magic house from scratch, they created the self-imposed restriction to minimize site disturbance as much as possible. Thus the project’s first step began with careful siting and working with existing topography to reduce site excavation. The project is rewarded with close proximity to native grasses and mature fir, oak, and aspen trees. Related: Prefab Pyrenees cabin minimizes site impact and building costs Black Magic is clad in a black metal corrugated skin that contrast with the leafy mountainside. Large windows punctuate the black metal facade to frame views of the outdoors and bathe the white oak-lined interior in natural light. The Black Magic home spans two levels with two bedrooms, a storage area, garage, and laundry room on the ground floor. The best views in the home are enjoyed from the upper floor, which contains the master suite on one end and an open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living room on the other. The living room opens up to a south-facing outdoor deck. + Rowland + Broughton Via Dezeen Images via Rowland + Broughton

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Worlds first LEED Platinum police station generates more energy than it consumes in Cincinnati

May 5, 2017 by  
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Serving the community goes hand in hand with serving the environment at this police station in Cincinnati. The Ohio city is home to the world’s first freestanding net-zero energy police station that’s also the first of its kind to earn LEED Platinum certification. Designed by local firm emersion DESIGN , the Cincinnati District 3 Police Station Headquarters is a beautiful facility that not only produces as much energy as it consumes, but also beautifies the community with public art and rainwater. Unveiled in July 2015 in the city’s Westwood neighborhood, the 39,000-square-foot District 3 Police Station Headquarters houses nearly 200 employees. Forty geothermal wells and a 330-kW solar array power the energy-efficient building, which consumes half the power used by traditionally built facilities of the same size. Since the building consumes less energy than it generates—the energy use intensity is 28 kBtu per square foot—the building is expected to save the city a significant amount of taxpayer money over the years. Related: BIG unveils plans for NYPD’s first-ever green-roofed police station The net-zero energy building was also designed with considerable community input, from the new station’s location to the selection of public art. As part of the state’s 1 Percent Art Program, the police station includes an LED art installation that tells the story of the district’s 14 neighborhoods. Generous amounts of glazing clad the station and create a sense of transparency with the community. The landscaping around the building incorporates native plantings and includes beautiful stormwater management design, such as rainwater gardens and a stone ‘river’ bioswale. + emersion DESIGN

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Worlds first LEED Platinum police station generates more energy than it consumes in Cincinnati

Times Square now has double the public space

April 20, 2017 by  
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The most visited destination in the United States now has double the public space—an amazing feat unimaginable just ten years ago. When New York City temporarily closed part of Broadway Street at Times Square to traffic and created a pedestrian plaza in 2009, many dismissed the experiment as foolish. But the removal of cars in favor of public space proved an incredible success and with the pilot project turned permanent, Times Square was forever reinvented. Today, the city announced the official completion of their reconstruction project: a 2.5-acre permanent pedestrian-only public plaza on Broadway designed by architecture firm Snøhetta. With an average of 45 million visitors each year—many of who look up at the billboards instead of the path in front—Times Square is notorious for its pedestrian traffic. Before the addition of pedestrian plazas, the exposure to vehicular traffic, slow-moving pedestrians , and small sidewalks made visiting Times Square an unpleasant, polluted, and sometimes unsafe experience. However, with the re-direction of vehicular traffic and the return of public space to pedestrians, Times Square dramatically transformed into a welcoming civic space. Pedestrian injuries decreased by 40 percent and crime in the overall area decreased by 20 percent. Air pollution has even fallen by as much as 60 percent. This week marks the official opening of the completed Times Square reconstruction project, designed by Snøhetta and completed in 2016. Together with the NYC Department of Transportation , Department of Design and Construction, and the Times Square Alliance, the architecture firm carved 2.5 acres of pedestrian space out of a project site known as the “Bowtie” in the heart of the Times Square Theater District, bounded by Broadway and 7th Avenue between 42nd and 47th streets. The first phase of the pedestrian street opened to the public in spring 2014. An overwhelming majority of New Yorkers and visitors agreed that the plaza has enhanced Times Square and made it a more pleasant place. Related: Snøhetta Selected to Design A New Car-Free Times Square “Conceived as a project whose success would be measured not only by its new aesthetic but also the long-term physical, psychological and economic benefits on its community, the reinvention of Times Square stands as a model for how the design of our urban landscapes can improve health and well-being of its users while providing an important stage for public gathering,” said Craig Dykers, Architect and Founding Partner of Snøhetta. The Bowtie is designed to accommodate multiple speeds of pedestrian circulation—330,000 people move through Times Square on average every day—using subtle design cues. Street furniture and other design elements also create a welcoming space to linger. Conceived as “an outdoor room right in the heart of Manhattan,” the plaza includes ten fifty-foot-long granite benches plugged into the city’s power grid and connected to 400-amp, 200-amp, and 20-amp power sources. The reconstruction project also allowed for major overhaul of outdated infrastructure, including the sewer lines below. + Snøhetta Images © Michael Grimm

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Times Square now has double the public space

"City of Dreams" pavilion on NY’s Governors Island will be made from 300,000 recycled cans

March 14, 2017 by  
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Every summer, Figment NYC selects a team to design and erect a temporary “City of Dreams” pavilion for its annual arts festival on Governors Island , a 172-acre plot of land in New York Harbor, just below Manhattan’s southernmost tip. Co-hosted by the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects and the Structural Engineers Association of New York , the competition is as much a meditation on the future of New York City as it is a call for novel and sustainability-oriented approaches to design. This year’s winning entry, dubbed “Cast & Place,” rehabilitates waste from eyesore to resource. The brainchild of Team Aesop, a group that consists of Josh Draper from PrePost / RPI-CASE , Lisa Ramsburg and Powell Draper from Schlaich Bergermann Partner , Edward M. Segal from Hofstra University , and Max Dowd from Cooper Union , the trellised structure will deploy roughly 300,000 community-sourced aluminum cans, though not in a way most of us would expect. A defining characteristic of the pavilion is its filigree-like pattern, which Team Aesop plans to create by making clay casts that they’ll allow to dry—and crack—inside a furnace. The cans will then be melted down and drizzled into the channels, creating rivulets of molten aluminum that turn solid as they cool. The designers originally wanted to use soil dredged from the East River, but scheduling difficulties forced them to look elsewhere. Team Aesop now has its eye on excavated earth from a construction site in Flushing, Queens, which it will frame with reclaimed wood from Big Reuse , an organization that turns demolition debris into building materials. Light but strong, the resulting pieces can be assembled into structures for both shelter and play. Flanking the standing structure will be “rain-soaked reflecting pools of dredge” that wear away to reveal the pavilion’s framework. They’re meant to foment contemplation, inducing “meditations on time, materiality, and the sources of our city,” Draper and company said. But Team Aesop can’t pay for everything alone. To raise funds, the designers have launched a Kickstarter campaign , with rewards that range from a pop-up postcard model of the pavilion to one of the 36 panels they eventually hope to make. Donors to the project can pride themselves as forward thinkers. Not only will they be helping shepherd a new fabrication method, but they’ll also be “enabling a conversation about the future,” Team Aesop said. “In a time of climate crisis, we need to rethink how we use energy and resources,” the designers added. “We asked ourselves: What if we used waste to make this pavilion? How could we find value in the valueless? Join our journey and become part of the conversation.” + Cast & Place: City of Dreams Pavilion on Kickstarter Photos by Schlaich Bergermann Partner/PrePost/Edward M. Segal/Max Dowd

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"City of Dreams" pavilion on NY’s Governors Island will be made from 300,000 recycled cans

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