New York Citys street trees have unique stories to tell

October 12, 2020 by  
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It’s been called a concrete jungle, but New York City is covered in trees. There are almost 700,000 street trees surrounded by the ultra-urban environment of NYC, and each one has its own story. One photographer decided to capture the spontaneous stewardship that occurs with these trees on the streets of New York every day. In a new photographic series, Matthew Jensen hopes to show everyone a little “Tree Love.” Jensen started noticing how the residents of New York care for their street trees as he walked around all five boroughs that make up the city. He began to observe how each tree was a little bit different and how many hands have helped care for each of these trees. Related: Check out Glasir, the tree-shaped urban farming solution Homemade tree guards, hand-lettered signs, decorations, ornaments, bird feeders and trinkets of all kinds can be spotted on the trees as you walk the streets of New York. Every little token is evidence that the residents of New York have taken it upon themselves to give personal care and attention to the hardy trees that share the streets with them. Jensen spent three years photographing the trees and the examples of human care that surround them. He ended up taking thousands of photos, fascinated with the subject and with the way each tree ends up becoming unique and individual thanks to those who live and work around it. “Old growth, self-planted, stunted, scarred, broken, coppiced, blighted, blight-resistant, rare, over-pruned, each tree exhibits time and circumstance in its own way,” Jensen said. “And tree beds are as equally idiosyncratic with homemade tree guards, hand drawn signs, unique plant and flower combinations, decorations and ornaments, benches, birdfeeders, and more often than not, too much garbage .” The final collection, titled Tree Love: Street Trees and Stewardship in NYC, is 75 images of street trees. Each one tells its own amazing story and is a powerful reminder than human beings and nature need each other. Street trees and city dwellers coexist in New York; in a way, they depend on each other. With a little more tree love around the world, everyone can do their part to help heal the planet. + Matthew Jensen Images via Matthew Jensen

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Architects want to turn the Tiber River banks into a thriving piazza

October 6, 2020 by  
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In its ongoing efforts to introduce imaginative public spaces into cities, New York-based Ballman Khapalova has unveiled a proposal to turn a section of the Tiber River into a new vital center for public life in Rome dubbed the Piazza Tevere. The proposed location is a perfectly rectangular area of the river between the Ponte Giuseppe Mazzini and the Ponte Sisto that is also the same size and proportion as the Circus Maximus, the ancient Roman chariot-racing stadium known as the first and largest stadium in Ancient Rome. To activate the river banks, sections of the river flood walls would be extended out into an alternating stepped profile that would expand public space at street level and make room to house equipment used for activities at the river promenade below. The Piazza Tevere design takes inspiration from Michelangelo’s cornice at the Palazzo Farnese, one of Rome’s most important High Renaissance palaces known for its rich ornamentation. Related: New resilient waterfront park helps protect NYC from storm surges “The creation of an inhabitable cornice at the top of the Tiber’s flood walls allows for the energy of the city to extend into the realm of the river,” the architects said of their proposal to horizontally extend portions of the flood wall into cornice-inspired ledges. “The Tiber, which currently divides Rome physically and experientially, becomes a place where the city can now come together. The rhythm of the cornice follows the city fabric on either side of the river, with Michelangelo’s uncompleted Farnese bridge forming the only alignment across the Tiber.” Extending sections of the flood walls would create space for amphitheater seating, fountains and Roman courtyard-inspired gardens to cultivate a greater connection between the street level and the water. The cornice-like ledges would also be used to house equipment for activities on the river promenade below such as lighting and sound equipment, theatrical rigging, retractable screens for projection and display and a platform elevator for bicycles and pedestrians . By providing greater access to the river promenade below, the architects have proposed a wide array of programming including bocce ball courts, rock climbing walls, outdoor gym equipment, large-scale outdoor art installations and even performance venues that can take place on land or from a floating concert hall on the river, with spectator seating set onto the river promenade. + Ballman Khapalova Images via Ballman Khapalova

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Proud Pour wines and cider benefit bees, oceans and coral reefs

September 29, 2020 by  
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Winemaking is one of the world’s oldest arts, spanning thousands of years. This has evolved into an industry that fuels destination travel, wedding venues and lively dinner conversation. Now, we can add sustainable practices to that list of accomplishments with a new line of wines by Proud Pour, whose aim is to inspire the environmentalist in everyone, even those who simply want to enjoy a pleasant glass of wine. Proud Pour began in New York City in 2014 when founder Berlin Kelly realized wine could be an avenue for environmental improvements. “I was living in NYC and drinking almost every night with my friends when I learned that NY Harbor has lost 95% of their wild oysters ,” Kelly explained. “I launched Proud Pour wines to raise money for NYC oyster restoration with the Billion Oyster Project , our first environmental partner.” Related: The differences between organic, natural, biodynamic and sustainable wines It’s easy to be inspired to save oysters and their habitat, because they are a critical filter for the oceans . In fact, a single oyster cleans 30 gallons of ocean water each day. To bring the project full circle, Proud Pour produces a Sauvignon Blanc labeled “Save the Ocean” (as in Save-ignon). Each bottle funds restoration efforts for 100 wild oysters. Efforts so far have provided restored habitats for 12 million wild oysters. A second offering from the company focuses on bee health . “Pinot for Bees” is a Pinot Noir that highlights the need for providing bee habitat. As the print on the bottle explains, “Every bottle plants 300 wildflowers,” which is equivalent to 35 square feet of prime bee habitat. Because bees are credited with providing one out of every three bites of food we eat, it’s great to see the company report that wine-lovers have already funded the planting of 75 acres of wildflowers. The third current selection is labeled, “Rosé for Reefs,” a rosé aimed at educating wine-lovers about the importance of coral reefs . According to the bottle, “Coral reefs cover just 1% of the ocean floor but support 25% of all marine life.” With that in mind, each three cases of this wine results in one new baby coral planting. To date, the company has funded the growth and planting of 112 baby corals. For those with a different palette and passion for sea turtles, Proud Pour produces a cider made from Connecticut River Valley apples. Like all of its products, Proud Pour’s Cider for Sea Turtles is sustainably grown and vegan . Proceeds from the cider fund the work at sea turtle hospitals that rescue and care for injured sea turtles so they can return to the ocean. The adventure that is Proud Pour is the result of a two-person show that includes Berlin Kelly, founder, and Brian Thurber, CEO. Thurber came on board in 2015, the same year the wine began hitting the store shelves. Even though just the two of them run the company, they rely on a host of partners to bring the project from grape to nonprofit funding. The process begins by connecting with high quality, sustainable winemakers in Oregon and California. On the other end of the process, they rely on nonprofits who work to protect bees, wild oysters, sea turtles and coral reefs, with more missions on the radar. Thurber told Inhabitat, “Up next are Grenache for Gray Wolves, Chardonnay for Sharks , and Syrah for Soil.” While myriad companies have joined 1% For the Planet as a way to give 1% of their net profits to environmental causes, Proud Pour has pledged a larger commitment. Proud Pour donates 5% of its top-line revenue, meaning the donation amount is calculated from the revenue, not the amount leftover after everyone gets paid. Proceeds are delivered to 22 environmental nonprofits across the U.S. Six years into the enterprise, the wines can be found in over 700 shops and restaurants in 18 states. That means there are more than 700 opportunities to spread the word about the environment and sustainable actions. “We’re making Proud Pour into the ultimate tool for recruiting new environmentalists,” Thurber said. “Our fans already use the wines as a casual way to talk about the environment with friends, and we’ll be building new storytelling tools to make those conversations a snap.” The current wines can be found online with shipping to 43 states. Each order is sustainably packaged with carbon-neutral shipping. Cider For Sea Turtles is only available in stores. While sale proceeds help restore invaluable ecosystems, the overall vision of Proud Pour is to facilitate conversations about the environment with a goal to create 5 million new environmentalists over the next decade. It seems like a reasonable discussion to have over a glass of wine. Inhabitat’s review of Proud Pour wines Occasionally companies offer to send us product samples so we can provide you with a well-rounded perspective, and let me tell you, few have been more fun to sample than Proud Pour Wines. Reviewing wine is entirely subjective, so obviously this is my layman’s opinion. The bottles are blanketed with the message of environmental awareness and it’s a beautiful thing — both informative and direct. Save the Ocean, the Sauvignon Blanc, struck me as buttery with a hint of citrus. It’s got more punch than a chardonnay but is tame enough for easy drinking. I can see how it would pair well with oysters and other seafood . Pinot for the Bees was my personal favorite, considering I’m a red wine fan. Living in Oregon, I’m spoiled by Pinot Noir, so I wasn’t surprised to discover the wine was vinted and bottled a few hours from my house. I found the vintage to be light and smooth. Although it lacks the complexity of big reds, most Pinots do, so it’s not a strike, just more of a profile note. Speaking of notes, this is an easy drinker any time of year. Rosé for Reefs is a light and crisp option. It’s not a sweet rosé but very quaffable with a gorgeous, medium-pink color. We added strawberries for a burst of fresh, late-summer flavor. Overall, each wine was a solid option in its own right, and the printed bottle is a beautiful representation of what conversations around sustainable actions should look like. Cheers to that. + Proud Pour Images via Proud Pour and Dawn Hammon / Inhabitat Editor’s Note: This product review is not sponsored by Proud Pour. All opinions on the products and company are the author’s own.

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Testbeds repurposes architectural mockups into community assets in NYC

August 11, 2020 by  
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New York-based New Affiliates has teamed up with architect and historian Samuel Stewart-Halevy to launch Testbeds, an innovative, adaptive reuse initiative to transform architectural mockups from large-scale development projects into community structures such as classrooms, sheds and shade structures. The Testbeds’ pilot project will be located at the Edgemere Coalition Community Garden in Queens where, in collaboration with NYC Parks GreenThumb division, the designers hope to construct a multipurpose adaptive reuse structure in fall 2020. Architectural mockups from large-scale development projects are typically constructed from high-end, resilient materials and commissioned by developers and institutions to simulate various parts of a planned building. Yet after review, those architectural mockups are typically discarded as waste into landfills. New Affiliates, which has a special interest in turning construction waste streams into architectural resources, collaborated with Stewart-Halevy to try and redirect these mockups from New York’s luxury real estate market to historically disinvested communities in the outer boroughs.  Related: PAU unveils carbon-neutral Sunnyside Yard masterplan in NYC In their conceptual proposals, the designers have reimagined mockups into elements for new greenhouses , casitas, tool sheds, cold frames, classrooms and other garden structures. “The process of repurposing mockups requires coordination between a wide range of stakeholders including community garden boards, city agencies including Parks and Sanitation and real estate developers,” the designers explained.  The pilot project, for instance, required coordination with GreenThumb, which provides programming and material support to over 550 gardens in New York City. A mockup from the Tribeca condominium 30 Warren has been donated for the pilot project and consists of four custom concrete panels and an 8-by-5-foot glass window. The existing window will be used to frame a new room for meetings and classrooms placed beneath a large shade structure and next to a greenhouse and tool shed in the Edgemere Coalition Community Garden. The Testbeds team is currently fundraising for its pilot project and looking for partners and collaborators for this and future projects. + New Affiliates Images via New Affiliates

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ZHA creates modular, low-carbon housing platform for Roatn Prspera

August 11, 2020 by  
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In collaboration with AKT II and Hilson Moran, Zaha Hadid Architects has unveiled a new digital architectural platform for creating sustainable modular homes in Roatán Próspera, a semi-autonomous Economic Development Hub set to break ground on the north bay of Honduras’ island of Roatán. The platform merges the local Caribbean architectural vernacular with digital engineering techniques to minimize waste and carbon emissions while maximizing energy efficiency. The luxury modular homes will be developed as a “kit of parts” for quick site assembly and will follow a construction process aimed at benefiting the local economy. Zaha Hadid Architects’ digital platform will generate Roatán Próspera’s first residential units, which will respond to the climate, terrain and environment of the Caribbean and will integrate the island’s vernacular tradition of timber construction. Local materials and craftsmanship are emphasized in the construction process, from the sourcing of sustainable timber from certified forests on the Honduran mainland to the milling that will be done locally to further support the region’s economy. The lightweight timber elements can be prefabricated offsite for quick assembly to minimize waste, embedded construction energy and the development’s carbon footprint. Related: Prefab apartment proposal wants to make city living more sustainable “The design prioritizes sustainability and is integral to our vision for Roatán Próspera,” said Erick A. Brimen, CEO of Honduras Próspera LLC. “The island of Roatán is already a renowned tourist destination. Roatán Próspera will strengthen and diversify the local economy while creating homes defined by their natural environment.” The modular homes have also been developed with energy-saving principles and will be self-shading and oriented toward prevailing sea breezes for natural cooling. The homes can also be integrated with photovoltaic arrays for net-zero operations . Clients, who are now able to pre-purchase a home, can virtually plan their houses through the digital architectural platform, from customizing the spatial layout of their residence to choosing built-in furniture modules to fit their lifestyle preferences. + Zaha Hadid Architects Images via Zaha Hadid Architects

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Self-sufficient garden-city skyscraper proposed for NYC

August 7, 2020 by  
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International design practice Lissoni & Partners’ architecture, landscape architecture and masterplanning department Lissoni Casal Ribeiro has unveiled Skylines, a proposal for a futuristic, self-sufficient skyscraper. Developed for the Skyhive 2020 Skyscraper Challenge, the conceptual design is, in essence, a vertical city housed within a super-tall tower with mixed programming that includes residences, office spaces, a university, secondary schools, hydroponic farming, sports facilities, a hospital, cultural centers and more. The idealistic Skylines concept is meant to generate all of its own energy, food, and water onsite. Proposed for an urban lot measuring 80 meters by 130 meters, the Skylines skyscraper would consist of over 40 floors surrounded by large hanging gardens that grow within an external curtain of steel cables. The vertical city would place recycling centers, parking lots and access to a subway system underground. Retail would be located on the ground floor, followed by cultural centers, a hydroponic vegetable farming system, recreational facilities, offices, a university and other schools on the floors above. Related: Conceptual eco-village empowers women in Beirut The top floors, which look to comprise at least half the building height, would be dedicated to residential areas. Greenery would surround the building on all sides to create an image of an “vertical urban forest” and help mitigate solar heat gain and the urban heat island effect while contributing to improved air quality. “The year 2020 and the arrival of a global pandemic have indeed highlighted our weaknesses and shortcomings at a structural level, causing us to devise new ways of thinking the city and the infrastructures,” the architects said. “A system that produces, optimizes and recycles energy, a perfect microclimate that filters the air, absorbs carbon dioxide, produces humidity, reuses rainwater to irrigate the greenery, in addition to providing protection from the sun’s rays and the noise of the city. Skylines is therefore not simply an ecosystem but a cultural vision that involves social and economic processes aimed at improving the quality of life, not just a sustainable architecture but a modus vivendi.” + Lissoni & Partners Images via Lissoni Casal Ribeiro

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Tackling sustainability in sporting events

February 19, 2020 by  
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At the recent Super Bowl, the NFL focused on sustainability more than in past years with its Ocean to Everglades (O2E) initiative throughout South Florida. Efforts included education on invasive species, beach cleanups, food recovery and recycling initiatives. These conservation efforts are part of a larger trend internationally to shrink the carbon footprints of major sporting events. “Sports is one of the few avenues which can unite people of all different races, creeds and social status,” Matt Jozwiak said in an interview with Inhabitat. Jozwiak was a chef at swanky New York restaurant Eleven Madison Park before founding Rethink Food NYC . His organization feeds 2,000 New Yorkers a day by repurposing leftovers from restaurants and food companies in the tri-state area. Jozwiak is a big proponent of more sustainable sporting events. “The industry literally has the power to make drastic sustainability changes. When a sporting team comes out in favor of a cause, people listen.” He acknowledges there may be growing pains when adopting unfamiliar behaviors. “But eventually, fans will go along with the new changes.” Sporting events step up to sustainability Fans traveling to one European Cup match can generate almost 5,600 tons of carbon dioxide, according to the World Economic Forum. But now, many sports are taking a closer look at how to be more responsible. Tokyo’s 2020 Olympic Games are a leading example of organizers prioritizing sustainability in their planning. For example, builders will use locally sourced wood to construct the athletes’ village, and hydrogen fuel cells will power the event vehicles. Organizers plan to generate solar power onsite and recycle 99 percent of everything used during the event. With the exception of drinking water, they’ll use recycled rainwater for all Olympic water needs. Paris is hoping to be even more sustainable during its turn to host the 2024 Olympic Games. Related: Tokyo’s Olympic medals will be made from recycled phones Some European cities have given their football (soccer to Americans) stadiums an eco-makeover by installing seats made from recycled plastic. In Amsterdam, fans bought the old seats as souvenirs. The stadium in Pontedera, Italy boasts seats made using plastic from local waste. Meanwhile, in England, the Forest Green Rovers have won the title of world’s greenest football club by powering its grounds with solar, recycling water and serving an entirely vegan menu to players and fans. At the 2019 Helsinki International Horse Show, 135 tons of horse manure powered the electricity. A company called Fortum HorsePower enlists 4,300 Finnish horses to generate energy for electrical grids. Stadium food waste Jozwiak takes a special interest in food wasted inside stadiums. He’s found that stadiums are among the hardest places from which to rescue food, because they tend to only have games periodically and throw the food away afterward. Much of that food quickly spoils or gets soggy and unappetizing, like hamburger buns and pretzels. Stadiums should rely on freezers more, Jozwiak said. “Instead of purchasing food all the time, bulk purchase and immediately freezing can cut down a lot on the waste for sporting arenas. Proper refrigeration strategies can expand the lifecycle of food and reduce food waste.”  He also recommended a fire sale strategy for avoiding waste. “Implement a plan where spectators can purchase the remaining food to take home,” he advised. “A lot of food ends up in landfills . So if sporting arenas can provide the options for the fans to either buy or provide for free the remaining food, it would cut down on waste drastically.” One by one, stadium directors of operations need to craft individual action plans to become more sustainable, Joswiak suggested. In addition to avoiding food waste, he recommended conserving water and offering healthier food options with more vegetables and less meat . Stadiums should only contract with vendors who can manage recycling. New buildings should work to be LEED-certified. Joswiak suggested hosting a climate-related event for fans to explain and support all of these green changes. If fans could be convinced to bring their own reusable utensils, that would be great, too. Eco-travel to sporting events Of course, while the football match or the golf tournament is the main event, fans and players still have to travel to the game and may require overnight housing. According to Solar Impulse, 5 million people converged on Russia in 2018 to watch the FIFA World Cup. Their travel and accommodations generated about 85% of greenhouse gas emissions from this event, totaling about 1.6 million tons of carbon dioxide emissions. Related: Green-roofed Copenhagen sports center is open to the public 24/7 Some major governing bodies in sports are embracing carbon offset projects around the world to atone for their contribution to emissions. FIFA managed to offset 1.1 million tons of carbon emissions since the 2014 World Cup . The governing body for European football is promising to offset fan-generated emissions for the EURO 2020 competition. It has also collaborated with the 12 host cities to offer free public transportation to fans with tickets on the days of the matches. This should cut down on emissions and road congestion. Via World Economic Forum and Solar Impulse Images via Shutterstock

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Snhetta to revitalize Midtown Manhattan with vibrant garden

January 15, 2020 by  
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Midtown Manhattan will soon become much greener thanks to New York City Planning Commission’s unanimous approval of Snøhetta’s design for a new privately-owned public space (POPS) in 550 Madison, a Philip Johnson-designed postmodernist landmark. Designed as a “vibrant sensory retreat,” the new public space will take the shape of a lush garden — the largest of its kind in the area — that will become a haven for both people and urban pollinators. The garden is being developed as part of the recent renovation of 550 Madison, which will open this year as a multi-tenant building under The Olayan Group. This structure will be the only LEED Platinum and WELL Gold certified building in the Plaza District. Proposed for the west end of the tower, the 550 Madison garden will engage the public with a series of interconnected outdoor “rooms.” The landscape design takes inspiration from its urban surroundings and architecture. Philip Johnson’s playful use of circular motifs at 550 Madison will inform the geometry of the garden rooms, while the layered planting plan references the canyon-like verticality of Midtown Manhattan. The lush circular rooms will encourage passersby to slow down, linger, and connect with nature. “Privately-owned public spaces are a critical part of New York City’s public realm. Urban life thrives in and around spaces that allow us to connect with one another and to nature,” said Michelle Delk, Partner and Director of Landscape Architecture at Snøhetta. “Moreover, we need to make the most of the spaces we already have and recognize that they are part of a network that contribute to the livelihood of the city. We’re thrilled to be a part of renewing the future of this historic site.” Related: Philip Johnson’s secret brick and glass home in Manhattan, NYC The immersive green respite will comprise a seasonal Northeastern planting palette that will include evergreens, perennials and flowering shrubs. Over 40 trees will be planted in the space. An enormous glass canopy will flood the interior with natural daylight . The architects will also install a central water wall as a point of interest and noise buffer from the commotion of the neighborhood. Informational signage will punctuate the space and provide details about the site’s environmental and cultural history. + Snøhetta Via ArchPaper Images via Snøhetta

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BIG plans unveiled for pedestrian paradise in Downtown Brooklyn

January 3, 2020 by  
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After nearly a year of research, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) and WXY Studio have unveiled their visions for improving Downtown Brooklyn — a 370-acre urban district with updated streetscapes, plazas, and public spaces. Commissioned by the Downtown Brooklyn Partnership, the Downtown Brooklyn Public Realm Vision includes a comprehensive study of the urban district’s existing conditions as well as a bold, long-term design vision for making the area more inclusive, inviting, and safer for pedestrians and cyclists. The Downtown Brooklyn Public Realm Vision was created in response to Downtown Brooklyn’s unprecedented growth over the last fifteen years since its 2004 rezoning. The Downtown Brooklyn Partnership tapped WXY Studio and BIG, who worked in collaboration with Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects and Sam Schwartz Engineering, to create a comprehensive study and implementation plan. This plan is intended to help unify the growing mixed-use area and meet the needs of the diverse community, which is expected to welcome 50,000 additional residents by 2025. “The Plan draws upon the District’s existing conditions, systems, land uses and policies to create a bold design vision that is uniquely Brooklyn, provides a greener, safer pedestrian and bicycle experience, and unlocks projects, initiatives and pilots for a more vibrant public realm,” BIG explained in a project statement. “Downtown Brooklyn Public realm is re-animated into a playful environment largely focused on the pedestrian experience. A place where residents, workers and visitors can enjoy gathering outdoors, practice sports and celebrate the diverse culture of Downtown Brooklyn.” Related: Reclaimed NYC water towers are upcycled into a NEST playscape in Brooklyn To visually unify the updated streetscapes, the architects have proposed a distinct yellow-orange color palette for the mixed-use area that will be applied to the bike paths, street furniture, and planters. Greenery and public art have also been woven throughout the pedestrian-friendly design. + BIG + WXY Studio Images via BIG

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NYC bans processed meats served in public schools

October 8, 2019 by  
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In an effort to improve the Big Apple’s public health, all processed meats will no longer be offered at New York City public school and public university cafeterias. That means no pepperoni, bacon, cold-cut deli meats, sausages or hot dogs for lunch. The new ban follows on the heels of the city’s successful test-run across all city schools of Meatless Mondays. Policymakers and education officials say the decision to adopt Resolution 238 is thanks to scientific evidence linking disease and other ailments with red and processed meats . The move paves the way to healthier food choices, minimizing any associated health risks. Related: Meatless Mondays are coming to public schools in New York City Over the years, the World Health Organization has warned that processed meats are carcinogenic, increase the likelihood of obesity and pre-diabetes among children and teens and elevate risk factors associated with heart disease, cardiovascular disease and colorectal cancer rates among young adults. But these conditions, researchers say, are preventable through dietary and lifestyle changes. Similarly, the National Cancer Institute announced that young people of today exhibit double to quadruple the risks of colorectal cancers, when compared to those of the 1950s. Why? Sadly, today’s youth have diets low in fiber and high in processed meats, exacerbated by lifestyles lacking in physical activity . Even more worrisome, studies have shown just one hot dog or two bacon strips per day increases colorectal cancer risks by 18 percent. “We cannot continue feeding our children substances scientifically proven to increase cancer later in life,” said Brooklyn borough president Eric Adams. “Chicken nuggets and sloppy joes are in the same class of substances as cigarettes. We know that we would never give our children cigarettes to smoke, so there’s absolutely no reason why we should continue poisoning our children’s health with processed foods .” The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics affirms that those following plant-based diets show lower rates of health complications than their omnivorous counterparts. In other words, curbing unhealthy meat consumption and removing processed meats from school menus is a positive change for students’ health. By offering more nutritious meals on public school campuses, from preschool through university, all NYC students can be better nourished, likely boosting academic performance and overall well-being. In September 2018, the Santa Barbara Unified School District (SBUSD) became the first school district in the country to remove processed meats from all school lunch lines. This recent ban in such a large metropolitan area shows that the move toward providing plant-based alternatives for more nutritious school meals is gaining momentum. + Resolution 238 Via TreeHugger Image via Shutterstock

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