Higher CO2 levels may lead to decreased nutrients in rice

May 24, 2018 by  
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According to new research from an international team of scientists, the increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere may cause a decrease in the nutritional value of  rice . Published in the journal Science Advances , the study concludes that rice contains lower levels of four essential B vitamins when grown under atmospheric conditions similar to those expected by the end of the 21st century. This aligns with similar studies that found that higher levels of carbon dioxide can result in reduced amounts of protein, iron and zinc in rice. The scientists conducted the study using 18 common strains of rice grown in fields in China and Japan. For the first time, research reveals that vitamins B1, B2, B5 and B9, all of which are important to the body’s ability to turn food into energy, decrease in rice as carbon dioxide levels increased. “This is an underappreciated risk of burning of fossil fuels and deforestation,” study co-author and director of the University of Washington Center for Health and the Global Environment Kristie Ebi said in a statement . The adverse effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide reflect the unanticipated consequences of climate change. “People say more CO2 is plant food, and it is. But how plants respond to that sudden increase in food will impact human health as well, from nutritional deficits, to ethno-pharmacology, to seasonal pollen allergies — in ways that we don’t yet understand,” study co-author Lewis Ziska said. Related: Chinese scientists created a type of rice that can grow in saltwater The conclusion that rice will become less nutritional as climate change continues carries significant consequences for more than two billion people who depend on the grain as their primary food source. “Rice has been a dietary staple for thousands of years for many populations in Asia and is the fastest growing food staple in Africa,” Ebi said. “Reductions in the nutritional quality of rice could affect maternal and child health for millions of people.” Via University of Washington School of Public Health Images via University of Washington School of Public Health and  Depositphotos

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Higher CO2 levels may lead to decreased nutrients in rice

Flint representative’s staff barred from attending EPA chemical summit

May 24, 2018 by  
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The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been trying to keep certain people out of a toxic chemical summit, according to reports. Some journalists were barred from entry on Tuesday, and representative Dan Kildee (D-Michigan), who represents Flint , said on Twitter  that his staff wasn’t allowed to attend the EPA’s summit on Wednesday. Kildee said EPA administrator Scott Pruitt’s “lack of transparency and willingness to deny access to Members of Congress and the media is deeply troubling.” My staff was not allowed to attend today's @EPA #PFAS summit, and I represent communities affected by drinking water contamination. @EPAScottPruitt 's lack of transparency and willingness to deny access to Members of Congress and the media is deeply troubling. https://t.co/TK6ojDQ77o — Rep. Dan Kildee (@RepDanKildee) May 23, 2018 Several sites in Kildee’s district are contaminated with per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in Kildee’s district, according to Earther — and those substances were the focus of the National Leadership Summit on PFAS. So, it seems like it would have made sense for Kildee’s staff to attend an event on the chemicals. Pruitt said in an op-ed piece published by the Detroit Free Press that, at the summit, representatives “from more than 35 states — including Michigan — more than 20 federal partners, several tribes, dozens of industry, non-governmental groups and other national organizations will share valuable recommendations for how EPA should deal with PFAS in communities and communicate the risks associated with PFAS.” Related: The EPA wants to limit what science can be used to create regulations Tuesday’s attendee list included Kildee’s staff, and they were told Wednesday sessions were “limited to federal agency folks and states.” A spokesperson for Kildee said that was accurate but the “larger issue, in the Congressman’s opinion, is the EPA limiting or denying access to the taxpayer-funded PFAS summit, either to Members of Congress, the media, or the general public.” Pruitt said Michigan is to spend $1.7 million on testing water supplies — “including in 1,380 public water systems and 461 schools” — after finding PFAS in drinking water and lakes. Michigan stopped providing bottled water to Flint residents in April and said the water is safe. Many Flint residents don’t buy that; local LeeAnne Walters, a 2018 Goldman Environmental Prize winner , and other residents launched an ongoing Chuffed campaign to get water to the housebound, elderly, and disabled. + White House Via ThinkProgress and Earther Images via Depositphotos (1)

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Flint representative’s staff barred from attending EPA chemical summit

Energy company ditches plan to install a possible tar sands oil facility in New York

May 24, 2018 by  
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Environmentalists celebrated a victory in New York state after an energy company tossed out a 5-year-old plan to install a facility that could have handled Canadian tar sands oil. The plan had clear environmental risks and posed a threat to area residents. After resistance from environmental groups and the public,  Global Companies  decided to abandon the plan. Erin Doran, senior attorney at Riverkeeper , an environmental organization devoted to protecting the Hudson River , said in a statement , “The proposal threatened the health of neighboring communities and would have placed the Hudson River at a greater risk for a disastrous oil spill .” Massachusetts-based Global Companies had requested boilers capable of handling heavy crude at the Port of Albany back in 2013 — Times Union pointed out the company did not indicate the facility would be used for tar sands oil, although it could have — and a legal battle ensued. Company spokesperson Liz Fuller told the Times Union, “We are withdrawing that request and plan to resubmit a renewal application with modifications later this year. The changes to the permit will include a reduction in the amount of crude oil handled through the terminal and will not include a system for the heating of crude oil.” Related: Extreme fossil fuel financing has surged to $115BN under Trump Doran said this is the second major victory in 2018 for Hudson River protection, “…coming after the defeat of industry’s request for new anchorage grounds to facilitate the transport of more crude oil.” She said since 2014, together with other partners, Riverkeeper had been battling the plan in court. She called on New York’s Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) to approach Global Companies’ next submission “as a new application and to ensure that the operations at this facility finally undergo a comprehensive environmental review.” According to the Times Union, Global Companies sued that department back in 2015 for failing to issue a permit for the boilers, and DEC won an appeals court ruling earlier this year upholding its decision that the energy company’s permit application lacked sufficient information. This week, DEC said it was pleased that Global Companies withdrew its plan. Earthjustice lawyer Chris Amato described this development as “a huge victory for the families that live, work, and go to school in Albany’s South End…Global’s proposal would have spewed more toxic pollution into the air, endangering the health of South End residents, including hundreds of children who live and attend [Giffen Elementary] school in the shadow of the Global facility. This has been, and continues to be, a fight for environmental justice .” + Riverkeeper Via the Times Union Images via Bill Morrow and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

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Energy company ditches plan to install a possible tar sands oil facility in New York

41 Nutrient-packed Superfoods Ranked in New Study

June 19, 2014 by  
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Who’d have thought it? An unassuming leafy green often used as decorative garnish might just be the healthiest food you can eat. Researchers at William Paterson University put watercress at the top of a list of 41 “powerhouse fruits and vegetables” that contain 17 nutrients critical for human health. The study, recently published in the CDC journal Preventing Chronic Disease , gives watercress a score of 100 out of 100 for nutrient contents because it contains large amounts of fiber, potassium, protein, calcium, folate, vitamin B12, vitamin A, vitamin d, and other important building blocks for the human body. Read the rest of 41 Nutrient-packed Superfoods Ranked in New Study Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: CDC , food , Health , nutrients , nutrition , preventing chronic disease , superfoods , vitamins , watercress , william paterson university

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41 Nutrient-packed Superfoods Ranked in New Study

Nutrient Found In Broccoli Could Yield Powerful New Cancer-Preventing Sunscreen

September 7, 2013 by  
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We’ve all heard that food is the best medicine, but a new study out of the University of Arizona found that nutrient-dense foods could also be useful as topical applications. According to researcher  Sally Dickinson , a naturally occurring compound in broccoli is loaded with chemopreventive properties. The nutrient is known as Sulforaphan, and if added to the list of ingredients in sunscreen, could dramatically increase the products cancer-preventing properties. “Sulforaphane is the kind of compound that has so many incredible theoretical applications if the dosage is measured properly,” Dickinson says. “We already know that it is very effective in blocking sunburns, and we have seen cases where it can induce protective enzymes in the skin.” READ MORE> Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: broccoli , cancer prevention , nutrients , skin cancer , sunblock , sunscreen , University of Arizona        

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Nutrient Found In Broccoli Could Yield Powerful New Cancer-Preventing Sunscreen

First Takes: China’s Energy Cap, Bigger Veggies Have Less Nutrients, and More…

August 4, 2011 by  
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China’s low-carbon plans, how oil supply will meet demand and the effect of breeding vegetables for higher yields are among the stories on our radar this morning.

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First Takes: China’s Energy Cap, Bigger Veggies Have Less Nutrients, and More…

Zoo Explores Poop Power and Insulation to Cut Carbon

March 10, 2010 by  
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Image credit: 10:10 Campaign/Michele Turton Paignton Zoo in the UK has already hit the headlines for exploring vertical farming to feed its animals . Now the zoo will be recycling the nutrients from that animal feed to power itself. That’s right, Paignton zoo is seriously looking at getting into poop power.

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Zoo Explores Poop Power and Insulation to Cut Carbon

What can I reuse or recycle to make an aquaponics system?

February 2, 2010 by  
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As I mentioned in reply to Charlotte yesterday, I recently read about the concept of aquaponics and was quickly smitten – another thing for my endless “cool things to do in the garden” list. It’s a good job it’s a pretty big garden. The idea is that you have a mutually beneficial veg bed and fish tank – the fish dirty up the water with lots of valuable nutrients (poop nutrients = pootrients) which is pumped up to fertilise the gravel-bottomed veg bed.

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What can I reuse or recycle to make an aquaponics system?

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