Study finds pollution is more deadly than war, natural disasters, and disease

October 23, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Study finds pollution is more deadly than war, natural disasters, and disease

Environmental pollution isn’t just inconvenient, it’s also deadly. Every year, more people are killed by pollutants — from toxic air to contaminated water — than by all war and violence. Pollution is also responsible for more deaths than AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria combined. This disturbing revelation was revealed in a new study published in the Lancet medical journal. Scientists determined that one out of every six premature deaths (about 9 million in 2015) results from pollution; and while life is more important than money, these deaths cause $4.6 trillion in annual losses or about 6.2 percent of the world’s economy. Epidemiologist Philip Landrigan, lead author and Dean of global health at the Icahn School of Medicine in New York, said, “There’s been a lot of study of pollution, but it’s never received the resources or level of attention as, say, AIDS or climate change. ” Landrigan added that pollution is a “massive problem” few truly comprehend, as what they’re witnessing are “scattered bits of it.” This is the first study of its kind to take into account data on all diseases and death caused by pollution combined. According to the study , developing countries — primarily in Asia and Africa — are putting the most people at risk due to a lack of air and soil pollution monitoring systems. In 2015, one out of four (2.5 million) premature deaths in India and one out of five (1.8 million) premature deaths in China were caused by pollution-related illness. “In the West, we got the lead out of the gasoline, so we thought lead was handled. We got rid of the burning rivers, cleaned up the worst of the toxic sites. And then all of those discussions went into the background,” said Richard Fuller, head of the Pure Earth and one of the 47 scientists who contributed to the report. In Bangladesh , Pakistan, North Korea, South Sudan and Haiti, nearly one-fifth of premature deaths are pollution-related. Based on this information, it should not come as a surprise that the poorest suffer most from pollution-related illness. 92 percent of sickness related to environmental toxicity occurs in low- or middle-income countries. Phys reports, “Environmental regulations in those countries tend to be weaker, and industries lean on outdated technologies and dirtier fuels.” Fuller noted that this safety of the public is being compromised for industrial growth, which has negative repercussions. He said, “What people don’t realize is that pollution does damage to economies . People who are sick or dead cannot contribute to the economy. They need to be looked after.” To determine the global impact of pollution , the study’s authors used methods outlined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for assessing field data from soil tests, in addition to air and water pollution data from the Global Burden of Disease. Though 9 million pollution-related deaths is a “conservative” estimate, it is still 15 times the number of people killed in war or other forms of violence, and six times the number killed in road accidents . Ernesto Sanchez-Triana, the lead environmental specialist at the World Bank, said, “The relationship between pollution and poverty is very clear. And controlling pollution would help us address many other problems, from climate change to malnutrition . The linkages can’t be ignored.” + Lancet Via Phys Images via Pixabay

More: 
Study finds pollution is more deadly than war, natural disasters, and disease

Snhetta designs Europes first underwater restaurant

October 23, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Snhetta designs Europes first underwater restaurant

Europe’s first underwater restaurant offshore of Norway will put a new spin on the meaning of “dining with a view.” Snøhetta just unveiled designs for “Under,” a submerged restaurant that will offer spectacular views of the seabed and double as a research center for marine life. Advanced heating pump technology that taps into the seabed’s thermal mass will maintain the restaurant’s comfortable interior temperatures year-round. Under—which translates to “wonder” in Norwegian—will be housed in a monolithic concrete shell that appears to have sunk halfway into the sea. Located by the village of Båly at the southernmost point of the Norwegian coast, the building will rest directly on the seabed five meters below the water’s surface, where it will become an artificial mussel reef as a water-purifying mollusk community attaches to the building’s coarse surface. Meter-thick concrete walls will protect the structure from pressure and shock in the sea, while an 11-by-4-meter panoramic acrylic window frames views of the seabed and wild fauna. Related: Snøhetta unveils spectacular makeover for nation’s second-largest waterfall Visitors to Under will enjoy locally sourced seafood fare prepared by Danish chef Nicolai Ellitsgaard Pedersen as well as an educational journey thanks to informational plaques mounted along the trail to the restaurant entrance. The interior is fitted out in locally sourced materials and a warm-toned, natural materials palette, as well as muted lighting, to keep the emphasis on underwater views. The restaurant, which seats 80 to 100 guests, will be used as a marine biology research center on its off-hours. Snøhetta writes: “Through its architecture, menu and mission of informing the public about the biodiversity of the sea, Under will provide an under-water experience inspiring a sense of awe and delight, activating all the senses – both physical and intellectual.” + Snøhetta

Here is the original:
Snhetta designs Europes first underwater restaurant

Daan Roosegaarde unveils mind-expanding 295-foot SPACE installation in Eindhoven

October 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Daan Roosegaarde unveils mind-expanding 295-foot SPACE installation in Eindhoven

Most of us won’t have a chance to blast off to outer space and glimpse the beauty of Earth at night. But designer Daan Roosegaarde’s firm Studio Roosegaarde brought that image of light and darkness to the Eindhoven Railway Station in the Netherlands . This new, interactive art installation, called SPACE , gives travelers the opportunity to, in the words of Roosegaarde, “experience a new dimension of light, just as an astronaut sees it in an orbit of the Earth.” Inhabitat spoke with Roosegaarde to hear more. People walking through Eindhoven Station will now have a good reason to linger a while. Studio Roosegaarde ‘s SPACE illuminates a tunnel with a 90-meter, or 295-foot, artwork, drawing on NASA satellite imagery of the Earth. Roosegaarde told Inhabitat the piece is “about wonder, and bringing some silence and imagination in this busy train station.” SPACE is located where Eindhoven Station’s main entrance once was, before it was renovated, and the art installation was designed to add the feeling of more space as it enhances the architecture. Related: INTERVIEW: Designer Daan Roosegaarde on smog temples, space trash, and what’s next The Studio Roosegaarde team opened Earth into one long strip, like you might peel an apple or orange. They digitally edited the NASA images into a composite 3D image. Using new technology, they actually printed lenses to create the illusion of depth. Roosegaarde told Inhabitat, “It sort of relates to your old bank card: when you would rotate it you would see different images, the sort of hologram-type of feeling. Well, we went back to the lab, and really started enhancing that, so you have 20 lenses per inch, and each lens has 45 images.” Controlled LED lights brighten the artwork, providing contrast between places like North Korea and South Korea, or around the Nile River in Egypt. “UNESCO is actually working on the idea that a dark sky is a right, like an experience that everyone must be able to see the stars at night. They’re working on that to make that sort of like a world heritage,” Roosegaarde told Inhabitat. “And that is fascinating, because we work a lot with light, but we also appreciate darkness, and only using light when it’s needed. Why do we have streetlights burning the whole night when nobody’s there? That’s really stupid. Can we not make that smarter, more interactive, more personal?” The images in SPACE come from outer space, but Roosegaarde was also inspired by the idea of “space in your head.” He told Inhabitat, “You look at it, and you wonder. I think there’s not a lack of money in this world, or of technology; there’s a lack of imagination. It’s space in your brain: space to think, space to imagine. That’s what makes us human. That’s our true capital.” Eindhoven – which is the city of light – commissioned the artwork along with ProRail and National Dutch Railways for the train station’s restored passenger tunnel, which was designed by Luc Veeger of Arcadis . SPACE will be highlighted during Dutch Design Week , which will take place from October 21 through October 29. + Studio Roosegaarde Images courtesy of Studio Roosegaarde

Original post: 
Daan Roosegaarde unveils mind-expanding 295-foot SPACE installation in Eindhoven

Google will be powered by 100% renewable energy by 2018

October 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Google will be powered by 100% renewable energy by 2018

After 10 years as a carbon-neutral company, Google has announced that all of its data centers and offices will be powered by 100 percent renewable energy , mostly from solar and wind sources. The corporate giant made quick progress towards meeting their goal, which was set in 2016 and will be fulfilled by 2018. In its 2017 Environmental Report, Google, self-described as the largest corporate purchaser of renewable energy, declared that in making its big shift to clean energy, it had pioneered “new energy purchasing models that others can follow” and “helped drive wide-scale global adoption of clean energy.” “We believe Google can build tools to improve people’s lives while reducing our dependence on natural resources and fossil fuels,” said Google executive Urs Hölzle. Google’s rapid shift to clean energy is welcome not only for the influence it may have on other companies but also for its impact on Google’s energy consumption, which was estimated in 2015 to be as large as the city of San Francisco . In line with its sustainability focus, Google has also launched an initiative to add air quality sensors to Google Street View vehicles and plans to change its waste disposal systems to ensure that the company adds nothing to landfills. Half of Google’s 14 data centers have already reached that particular milestone. Related: Alphabet X to beam wireless service to Puerto Rico with a fleet of balloons Most of Google’s renewable energy is purchased from an outside provider. However, they are making important moves to provide some of their own in-house energy, including the company’s recent acquisition of the Tellenes wind farm in Norway. The 12-year deal to provide 100 percent of the energy produced will power Google’s data centers in Finland, Belgium, the Netherlands and Ireland . Google expects to purchase power as soon as it is available, which is expected in fall 2017. Via Inverse Images via Wikimedia Commons   (1)  and Robbie Shade/Flickr

Here is the original:
Google will be powered by 100% renewable energy by 2018

North Korean construction workers fed crystal meth to accelerate skyscraper project

August 12, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on North Korean construction workers fed crystal meth to accelerate skyscraper project

There are many ways to speed up a construction job, but project managers in North Korea are reportedly turning to a dangerous method to get workers to build faster. An inside source told Radio Free Asia that construction workers building a skyscraper in the capital city of Pyongyang are being fed crystal meth so they can work faster. In a country already well-known for severe human rights violations , this is devastating news. The builders in question are working on a 70-story building in the heart of North Korea’s capital city, which is just one part of a 60-building development on Pyongyang’s Ryomyung Street. Reportedly, there are hundreds of thousands of construction workers on the job site, although the anonymous source didn’t specify how widespread the drug use might be. “Project managers are now openly providing drugs to construction workers so that they will work faster,” the source told Radio Free Asia. “Project managers at a building site in North Korea’s capital Pyongyang are openly supplying their exhausted workforce with powerful methamphetamine called ‘ice’. [They] are undergoing terrible sufferings in their work.” Related: Paris climate deal: North Korea ratification pushes GHG ticker over 1% Embed from Getty Images Pressure to make swift progress on the ambitious building project has been mounting, following North Korea ’s announcement about ushering in a “great golden age of construction.” Yet, several of leader Kim Jong-un’s big pet projects, including the long-awaited Ryugyong Hotel, are years behind schedule. Rumors about meth distribution by project managers are backed up by graffiti found on the building site, which reportedly reads, “Pyongyang speed is drug speed,” alluding to the connection between drug use and the speed of construction. Even people who never saw an episode of Breaking Bad know that crystal meth is a dangerous drug, and regular use can lead to heart attack, brain damage, and psychoses. And one can only imagine how structurally sound a building might be after being erected by a bunch of drugged out construction workers. Via Dezeen Images via Aram Pan

View original here: 
North Korean construction workers fed crystal meth to accelerate skyscraper project

Bowl-shaped stadium in the UAE uses smart design to stay naturally cool in searing heat

August 12, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Bowl-shaped stadium in the UAE uses smart design to stay naturally cool in searing heat

The 60,000-seat Mohammed bin Rashid Stadium will serve as the centerpiece of a new mixed-use sports complex in Dubai . The complex will also include training facilities, a practice pitch, warm-up areas, a 5,000-space car park, a museum, a multipurpose sports hall, retail, restaurants, and public parks. The stadium’s elevated playing field will be FIFA-compliant. The mixed-use sports complex was developed as part of Dubai’s “Sports Innovation Lab” initiative that aims to make the UAE an international sports destination. Related: The world’s new tallest tower moves forward in Dubai The bowl-shaped stadium and the playing field are elevated above ground level to create a shaded entry plaza below. The landscaping, which includes tall trees, and the water features create a comfortable microclimate . The permeable facade is outfitted with solar shading fins that help keep the stadium cool and also cast an interesting play of geometric shadows on the plaza floor. + Perkins+Will Via ArchDaily

Go here to read the rest: 
Bowl-shaped stadium in the UAE uses smart design to stay naturally cool in searing heat

Paris climate deal update: North Korea ratification pushes GHG ticker over 1%

August 8, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Paris climate deal update: North Korea ratification pushes GHG ticker over 1%

North Korea is the latest country to ratify the Paris climate agreement , becoming the 22nd nation to submit its ratification document to the United Nations. The recent ratification by the totalitarian state pushed the greenhouse gas emissions ticker of countries that have ratified the agreement to over one percent (1.09 percent). North Korea represents .23 percent of global GHG emissions, second to Cameroon among the ratifiers so far. The African nation, which ratified the agreement on July 29, represents .45 percent of global emissions. A total of 55 nations representing 55 percent of global emissions are needed for the agreement to enter into force . In accordance with Article 21 of the Paris agreement, the deal enters into force 30 days after the necessary amount of ratifications. The world’s top two emitters, the United States and China, have committed to ratifying the agreement by the end of the year. India, the number three emitter, has indicated it will work toward the goal of ratification. The United States represents 17.89 percent of global emissions, China represents 20.09 percent of global emissions and India represents 4.10 percent of global emissions. Together they would bring the ticker to 43.16 percent. Related: 14 Pacific island nations considering world’s first ban on fossil fuels The European Union and its 28 member states represent 12.08 percent of world emissions. The EU is expected to ratify . Other countries working on ratification soon include Canada (1.95 percent), Mexico (1.70 percent), Iceland (0.01 percent) and Brazil (2.48 percent). In addition to North Korea and Cameroon, the countries that have ratified so far include Barbados, Belize, Fiji, Grenada, Guyana, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Nauru, Norway, Palau, Peru, Samoa, Seychelles, Somalia, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Palestine (the U.S., Israel and other countries do not recognize unilateral Palestinian statehood) and Tuvalu. Kazakhstan recently signed the Paris climate agreement , becoming the 180th signatory country. UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon met with with Erlan Idrissov, foreign minister of Kazakhstan, at UN headquarters in New York to congratulate his country for signing the agreement. The World Resource Institute’s Paris Contributions Map allows users to track the number of ratifications and emissions percentage as well as the number of parties signed on to the agreement. + Paris Agreement Tracker Via Climate Action News Images via Flickr

Read more:
Paris climate deal update: North Korea ratification pushes GHG ticker over 1%

2017 BMW 740e turns BMW’s flagship sedan into a plug-in hybrid

August 8, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on 2017 BMW 740e turns BMW’s flagship sedan into a plug-in hybrid

With the recent introductions of the 3 Series and X5 plug-in hybrids, it was only a matter of time until BMW’s flagship sedan debuted with its own electrified powertrain. BMW has unveiled the 740e plug-in hybrid, which will be offered in three versions when it goes on sale later this year. With up to 30 miles of fully-electric driving range, the 740e plug-in hybrid may not be able to take on the Tesla Model S, but it represents a move in the right direction. When the 740e goes on sale, BMW is going to offer the large flagship sedan in three versions: BMW 740e iPerformance, long-wheelbase BMW 740Le iPerformance and BMW 740Le xDrive iPerformance. All three versions are powered by a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine that is mated to an electric motor to generate a total 326 horsepower and 369 lb-ft. of torque. The hybrid powertrain sends its power via an 8-speed automatic to either the rear or all four wheels. Depending on which model you choose, the 740e plug-in hybrid can travel between 25-30 miles in electric mode and it will take less than four hours to recharge from a domestic power socket and in under three hours from a BMW i Wallbox. Related: The 2017 BMW i3 gets an upgraded battery for 50% more driving range Just like BMW’s other electrified models, the 740e will offer different driving modes to suit the driver and improve the 740e’s efficiency. An eDrive button will allow the driver to choose between the Auto and Max drive settings. The Auto setting is the default setting that seeks to maximize range the 704e’s electric driving range by powering up the gasoline engine at 50 mph or if the driver floors it. With the Max setting, the 740e defaults to electric-only mode and can stay in this mode up to 87 mph. In the Max setting, the engine will still power up under spirited driving. There are other modes to control power usage: Adaptive, Comfort, Sport, and EcoPro. A Battery Control function allows the driver to force the 740e’s powertrain to maintain the battery charge anywhere between 30 and 100 percent that way electric power can be reserved. BMW hasn’t released all the pricing details for the 740e, but it’s expected to start around $90k, when it arrives in U.S. showrooms in the next month or two. + BMW All images @ BMW

See the original post: 
2017 BMW 740e turns BMW’s flagship sedan into a plug-in hybrid

North Korea bomb test wasn’t big enough to be an H-bomb, skeptics say

January 6, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on North Korea bomb test wasn’t big enough to be an H-bomb, skeptics say

Unless you’ve had your head in the sand, you’ve probably already heard North Korea’s announcement that it completed an underground test of a miniaturized hydrogen bomb . In a video released to the press, a female news anchor on the country’s state-run television station reports “the first H-bomb test was successfully conducted” on 6 January. The size of the explosion, however, is only slightly more than the last incident of nuclear weapons testing in 2013, leading skeptics to question what type of bomb was actually detonated. Read the rest of North Korea bomb test wasn’t big enough to be an H-bomb, skeptics say

See the original post here:
North Korea bomb test wasn’t big enough to be an H-bomb, skeptics say

Alison Douglas recycled concrete pipes to create a dreamy urban oasis

January 6, 2016 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Alison Douglas recycled concrete pipes to create a dreamy urban oasis

Read the rest of Alison Douglas recycled concrete pipes to create a dreamy urban oasis

More:
Alison Douglas recycled concrete pipes to create a dreamy urban oasis

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1052 access attempts in the last 7 days.