Fantastical off-grid home is the perfect pad for Fred Flintstone and Bilbo Baggins

October 18, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Fantastical off-grid home is the perfect pad for Fred Flintstone and Bilbo Baggins

If Fred Flintstone and Bilbo Baggins were roomies, this crazy stone dome home would be their perfect abode. Located just outside of Eugene, Oregon, the unique structure – which is currently on the market for $175,000 – was originally buried under soil and it has eight round rooms naturally lit by skylights. The interior comes complete with stone tables, reclaimed wood flooring, and Celtic artwork painted on the walls. The 1,826 square feet home was built in 1988 by Bob Adams, pastor of the adjacent Lorane Christian Church, and his wife, Vicki. Designed by Eugene architect Richard Britz, the home was originally covered in plastic and buried under soil as a way to regulate temperature, but is now just partially sheltered by the surrounding landscape. As far as materials, Adams used a number of repurposed materials in its construction such as reclaimed wood from a local gymnasium. Related: This Oregon dome home could be yours – if aliens don’t come for it first At the time of construction, building codes required homes to have a heat source, so Adams installed electric baseboard heaters. However, the interior temperature rarely dropped below or rose above a comfy 68 degrees so heating or air conditioner is rarely necessary . “You could live in that house, in that Lane County climate, and not burn a watt of electricity, as far as heating is concerned,” Adams explained. In addition to needing scant electricity, the home, which sits on almost an acre of property, has the potential to be completely off-grid . Various 6-foot-­diameter domed skylights were installed in the ceiling to provide natural light and natural ventilation is possible thanks to multiple windows. Nolan Scheid purchased the home 13 years ago from foreclosure and has used it for housing guests or just for quiet space ever since. However, the family has recently put it on the market, making it clear that it does need some work to make it a real home, even for ambitious off-gridders . Although the structure is technically complete with running water, it would need some extra wiring work to create a workable electric system. Additionally, the home has been damaged by rain falling through the open skylights over the years, so repairs would definitely be necessary. “It has a long ways to go,” owner Nolan Scheid said. “This is not your standard paint-it-and-be-done kind of house.” + Zillow Via The Register Guard

View original post here:
Fantastical off-grid home is the perfect pad for Fred Flintstone and Bilbo Baggins

Stanford sodium-based battery could be more cost-effective than lithium

October 18, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Stanford sodium-based battery could be more cost-effective than lithium

The quest for the best battery is of vital importance as the world transitions to renewable energy . Now a Stanford University -led team has designed what they think might offer a cheaper alternative to lithium – a sodium -based battery. While it’s not the world’s first sodium ion battery, the Stanford design costs 80 percent less than a lithium-ion battery , and it is capable of storing the same amount of energy . Lithium-ion batteries may currently reign supreme, but according to Stanford, sodium-ion batteries could compete in terms of cost-per-storage. They said lithium costs around $15,000 per ton to mine and refine, while the “widely available sodium-based electrode material” they utilized in their new battery costs a fraction of that at $150 per ton. It’s a significant difference as materials comprise around one quarter of the price of a battery. Related: Researchers successfully made a battery out of trash Stanford chemical engineer Zhenan Bao said in a statement, “Nothing may ever surpass lithium ion in performance. But lithium is so rare and costly that we need to develop high-performance but low-cost batteries based on abundant elements like sodium.” The sodium-based electrode is made up of a positively charged ion, sodium, and a negatively charged ion, myo-inositol. You may not be familiar with myo-inositol, but Stanford says it’s in baby formula, and derives from rice bran “or from a liquid byproduct of the process used to mill corn.” Like sodium, it too is naturally abundant. While the researchers think they have shown sodium-based batteries can be cost effective compared to lithium ion batteries, they aim to keep working on the design . They’ve optimized the charging cycle and cathode, according to Stanford, but engineer Yi Cui says optimizing the phosphorous anode could improve the battery. The journal Nature Energy recently published the study online . Stanford University engineers collaborated on the project with a researcher from the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory . Via Stanford University and New Atlas Images via Pixabay ( 1 , 2 )

Read more here:
Stanford sodium-based battery could be more cost-effective than lithium

Bad Behavior has blocked 955 access attempts in the last 7 days.