ThredUP’s Chris Homer on how the company uses machine learning in its operations

November 14, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on ThredUP’s Chris Homer on how the company uses machine learning in its operations

CTO and Cofounder Chris Homer says the resale market has doubled in the last five years and expects it to double again over the next five to 10 years.

More here:
ThredUP’s Chris Homer on how the company uses machine learning in its operations

Oracle Real Estate Facilities’ Francisco Ruiz on IoT and building efficiency

November 14, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Oracle Real Estate Facilities’ Francisco Ruiz on IoT and building efficiency

Data collected from AI and IoT technologies can empower companies to make better decisions about their energy consumption.

Go here to read the rest:
Oracle Real Estate Facilities’ Francisco Ruiz on IoT and building efficiency

Fukushima on track to become a renewable energy hub

November 14, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Fukushima on track to become a renewable energy hub

In hopes of reinventing its image, new life is breathing into Fukushima, the Japanese northeastern prefecture that was devastated by a 2011 tsunami and consequent nuclear power plant meltdown. Fukushima, which is Japan’s third largest prefecture, is revitalizing and transforming into a renewable energy hub. Eight years ago, in March 2011, a magnitude-9.0 earthquake triggered a massive tsunami, overwhelming the Fukushima reactors and causing the worst nuclear disaster since the 1986 Chernobyl incident. Decontamination of Fukushima’s nuclear plant and surroundings are ongoing. Related: Global renewable energy is projected to rise by 50% in the next 5 years, IEA finds Since 2011, both the Japanese state and Fukushima local governments have ramped up the prefecture’s renewable energy production. To meet the entire region’s needs with 100 percent renewable energy by 2040, endeavors are underway to cultivate and integrate clean energy sources like biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar and wind. There are already investor plans to construct 11 new solar farms and 10 wind power plants on under-utilized farmlands and hillsides tainted by radiation. Development of these new solar and wind power plants will take place in the next five years, with the first solar plant being a 20-megawatt (MW) installation planned for Minamisoma. Estimated costs for all the green energy construction runs upward of 300 billion Japanese yen, or $2.75 billion in U.S. dollars. Financiers and stakeholders supporting the renewable energy hub construction include the state-run Development Bank of Japan and the private lender Mizuho Bank. The Japanese are optimistic about the electrical power that will be generated, given the region’s current trajectory. Back in 2012, Fukushima only generated 400 MW of electricity, then increased to 1 gigawatt (GW) in 2016. By 2018, Fukushima region’s combined electrical power generation from renewables reached 1.5 GW. The 21 new plants under construction are expected to bring additional 600 MW to Fukushima’s energy output, the equivalent to powering 114,000 average American households. A new, 50-mile wide grid is similarly in the works. Via the power transmission network of Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), the grid will connect and feed power from Fukushima into metropolitan areas of Japan’s capital, Tokyo, about 155 miles south of the prefecture. Cost projections for the grid are 29 billion yen, or $267 million. This new clean energy action plan is aligned with the Fukushima prefecture’s goal of having renewables supply 40 percent of its electricity demand by 2020, two-thirds by 2030 and 100 percent by 2040. The end goal for 2040 is that the entire Land of the Rising Sun will be completely powered through renewable energy. Via Yale360 , Japan Times and Nikkei Asian Review Image via Andreas

Here is the original post:
Fukushima on track to become a renewable energy hub

BIGs LEED Gold-seeking school in Arlington features a cascade of green terraces

November 14, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on BIGs LEED Gold-seeking school in Arlington features a cascade of green terraces

After five years in the making, BIG has completed The Heights, a new public school building in Arlington, Virginia that not only offers a unique and energy-efficient take on school architecture, but also helps maximize density and open space. Located along the Rosslyn-Ballston corridor, The Heights combines two existing secondary schools into a new 180,000-square-foot building that opens like a fan with a cascade of green-roofed terraces to provide an indoor-outdoor learning landscape. An emphasis on natural daylighting, green space, material reuse and energy efficiency has put the building on track to achieve LEED Gold certification . Completed on a $100 million budget, the dynamic new school building houses two programs: the H-B Woodlawn Program that offers visual and performing arts-focused curricula for grades 6 through 12, and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver Program that serves students aged 11 to 22 with special needs. The school can accommodate an expected enrollment of up to 775 students. Related: Rammed earth Kopila Valley School is the “greenest school in Nepal” To make the most of a compact urban site bounded by roads on three sides, BIG organized the school as a stack of five rectangular floorplates rotated around a fixed pivot point to create a series of outdoor green-roofed terraces connected with a rotating central staircase. The spacious first terrace can be used for special events while the upper terraces are more suitable as classroom and study areas. The classroom “bars” have also informed the interior layout, which is anchored by a central vertical core containing the elevators, stairs and bathrooms as well as a triple-height lobby with stepped seating on the ground floor. For easy accessibility and to encourage public interaction throughout the school, the lobby is directly adjacent to many of the school’s common spaces, such as the 400-seat auditorium , main gymnasium, library, reception and cafeteria. Intuitive wayfinding is also extended to the classroom spaces in that each classroom “bar” is defined by its own color used to paint the walls and lockers. In contrast to its colorful interior, The Heights’ exterior is clad in white glazed brick to unify its fanned-out massing and to respect the surroundings, including the historic architecture of Old Town Alexandria. Select materials from the former Wilson School, which The Heights was built to replace, have been salvaged and reused in the new build. + BIG Photography by Laurian Ghinitoiu via BIG

View original post here:
BIGs LEED Gold-seeking school in Arlington features a cascade of green terraces

SunUp is a solar panel system perfect for hikers and adventurers

November 14, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on SunUp is a solar panel system perfect for hikers and adventurers

Hikers and outdoor enthusiasts can finally enjoy a solar panel that combines efficiency and durability with the added ability to fit snugly on top of a backpack. Rather than having to decide between a power source that is either efficient or durable, the SunUp is both, meaning it can power explorers through nearly any adventure. Invented by Bradley Brister in collaboration with The North Face, SunUp was designed as a final-year project for his Product Design Engineering bachelor’s course at Brunel University. The project was honored at the James Dyson Awards, where it was one of two runners up in the U.K. division of the contest. The awards recognize designs by current and recent engineering students from around the world. Related: Get ready for an adventure with this ultimate checklist of backpacking essentials According to Brister, the main focus of the project was to prove a more efficient and sturdier alternative to flexible solar panels . In the past, hikers looking to go off the grid had to choose between efficiency or durability. Rigid solar panels made of monocrystalline and polycrystalline silicone are 21 percent more efficient yet easily breakable, while flexible panels made with amorphous silicone are stronger but with 7 percent average efficiency. The SunUp solution was to incorporate small, thin-film polycrystalline solar panels with an advanced hinge mechanism. The metal hinges have the system circuits built-in, so the conductive joints won’t strain or harden as the panels are used over time. The segmented panels are able to move more freely when impacted or dropped, lessening the chance of breakage while simultaneously boosting efficiency. According to Brister, each module is interlinked by a conductive hinge that doesn’t produce any mechanical deformation when in use, eliminating the typical issue of solar panels that bend only a few thousand times before eventually snapping. Theoretically, the design can be flexed and bent indefinitely or until the surfaces wear down. The panels easily fit on top of a backpack but could also be mounted onto a canoe or any number of surfaces. If one of the panels breaks, it can be replaced without replacing the entire system, adding to the product’s sustainability and longevity. The 15W panel uses a 4000 mAh battery that fully charges within 12 hours. + SunUp Via Dezeen Images via Bradley Brister

See the rest here: 
SunUp is a solar panel system perfect for hikers and adventurers

Engie’s renewables chief on scaling corporate contracts, hydrogen hopes and offshore wind

November 4, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Engie’s renewables chief on scaling corporate contracts, hydrogen hopes and offshore wind

How do you add 9 gigawatts of solar and wind in the next three years? You turn to corporate buyers, universities, hospitals and cities to commit to at least half that capacity.

Here is the original post:
Engie’s renewables chief on scaling corporate contracts, hydrogen hopes and offshore wind

Green Seal at 30: What we’ve learned

November 4, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Green Seal at 30: What we’ve learned

Seven things you should know about ecolabeling.

Originally posted here:
Green Seal at 30: What we’ve learned

Making buildings the next great climate project

October 15, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Making buildings the next great climate project

Sponsored: Buildings are the next frontier for carbon emissions reduction and businesses should leverage a holistic approach.

Continued here:
Making buildings the next great climate project

Electric bus fleets are the latest tool for improving air quality

October 8, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Electric bus fleets are the latest tool for improving air quality

And both North America and Europe are primed for market growth over the next decade.

View post:
Electric bus fleets are the latest tool for improving air quality

Meet the startup behind Hilton’s recipe for curbing food waste

July 25, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Meet the startup behind Hilton’s recipe for curbing food waste

FoodMaven aspires to offer nationwide coverage within the next five years, after starting out in Colorado and Texas.

See original here:
Meet the startup behind Hilton’s recipe for curbing food waste

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1384 access attempts in the last 7 days.