An abandoned Chinese village is reborn as an interactive art destination

May 27, 2020 by  
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With 1 billion people estimated to be living in Chinese cities in 2050, China is seeing hundreds of thousands of its rural villages abandoned. In a bid to bring renewed life to one of its 102 abandoned villages, the Government of Jinxi tapped Dutch firm NEXT Architects to sustainably revitalize the ancient village of Dafang. Created in collaboration with IVEM (Dutch Institute for Cultural Heritage and Marketing), Smartland (landscape design), Total Design (graphic design) and numerous Dutch and Chinese artists, the recently completed Holland-Dafang Creative Village transformed a dilapidated village into a new hub for the arts. Spanning an area of 43,000 square meters, the Holland-Dafang Creative Village serves as an inspiring model of rural revitalization achieved by a multidisciplinary team of Chinese and Dutch architects. Led by the design strategy “adapt to newness,” the entire village of Dafang has been renewed with three main strategies: thoughtful restoration of the architecture and landscape; the construction of new public facilities; and the re-programming of spaces through art and activity. Related: MAD reactivates an abandoned Japanese tunnel using surreal immersive art Although Dafang has over 900 years of history, years of neglect has led to its deterioration. The architects restored the historical architecture with new materials, such as the use of glass roof tiles on the roofs of old houses and the resurrection of an ancient irrigation system with a new, natural helophyte filter for water purification . New construction was also added, including a sculptural watchtower — a throwback to the defense structure popularly used in ancient times — with a twisting form loosely resembling a giant Chinese “dragon column”. The team also included a new camphor tree-inspired public hall set on the former site of a courtyard building that had been destroyed in the Cultural Revolution. The designers also gave the restored landscape and architecture new purposes, from rehabbing old buildings into a new village museum to the creation of a library and artist studios. “Rural revitalization is one of China’s key future developments,” said John van de Water, partner of NEXT Architects in Beijing. “We believe this asks for the design of balance between old and new, living and visiting, history and future.”  + NEXT Architects Images via NEXT Architects

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An abandoned Chinese village is reborn as an interactive art destination

Spectacular Lucky Knot bridge in China twists and turns like a Mbius Strip

October 27, 2016 by  
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Located in the megacity Changsha’s rapidly developing New Lake District, Lucky Knot spans the Dragon King Harbor River and serves as an auspicious icon for the region. The steel-framed bridge stretches 185 meters in length and 24 meters in height and is painted red—a color symbolizing good luck and happiness in Chinese culture. The bridge’s unusual shape combines the principles behind the Möbius Strip and Chinese knotting, a decorative handicraft art typically made with red rope, and often used as auspicious wall hangings. The Lucky Knot’s eye-catching design isn’t the only way it stands out from most pedestrian bridges . Public engagement was a big focus of the design, which was crafted with recreational, ecological, and tourist activities in mind. Multiple landing platforms and cutouts, as well as the bridge’s multiple swooping levels that connect to different heights like the riverbank and the elevated park, encourage a sense of play. An LED light show brings the bridge to life at night. The undulating bridge offers stunning views of the river, Meixi Lake, the city of Changsha, and the surrounding mountains. Related: Bat bridge provides shelter for our winged friends in the Dutch town of Monster “The Lucky Knot is more than a bridge and a connection between two river banks. Its success lays in bringing cultures together, and in the fusion of history, technology, art, innovation, architecture and spectacle,” said NEXT architects Beijing partner Jiang Xiaofei. + NEXT architects Images © NEXT architects / Photography: Julien Lanoo

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Spectacular Lucky Knot bridge in China twists and turns like a Mbius Strip

Worlds first Rose Museum in Beijing is wrapped in a beautiful perforated facade

July 13, 2016 by  
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? Set on a 100-hectare rose park that exhibited over 2,000 species of roses for the convention, the Beijing Rose Museum was designed to engage and overlook its stunning surrounding views. The museum is a modern take on the historical Chinese courtyard house that embraces and encloses open spaces, as a nod to traditional Chinese architecture. To showcase the history and culture of rose cultivation in China, which dates back to at least the 11th century B.C., NEXT architects wrapped the building in a 300-meter-wide, 17-meter-tall soft, stainless steel facade perforated with rose-shaped patterns. The detached facade creates a series of walled-off courtyards. Related: Bat bridge provides shelter for our winged friends in the Dutch town of Monster “The main challenge with the Rose Museum was to find a modern Chinese identity for a building which significance is so deeply rooted into Chinese culture,” said John van de Water, partner at NEXT Architects. The semi-transparent stainless steel walls blur the boundaries between the indoor and outdoor landscape. At night, the museum lights up from within for a beautiful glowing appearance that can be enjoyed from across a lake. + NEXT Architects Images via NEXT Architects , by Xiao Kaixiong

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Worlds first Rose Museum in Beijing is wrapped in a beautiful perforated facade

Bat-friendly bridge provides shelter for our winged friends in Monster

October 26, 2015 by  
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Four Visionary Designs Unveiled for D.C.’s First Elevated Park

September 12, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Four Visionary Designs Unveiled for D.C.’s First Elevated Park Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 11th street bridge park , Balmori Associates , dc elevated park , elevated park , Höweler + Yoon Architecture , high line , Magnusson Klemencic Associates , next architects , OLIN , oma , Stoss Landscape Urbanism , Wallace Roberts & Todd , washington dc elevated park

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Four Visionary Designs Unveiled for D.C.’s First Elevated Park

Arching Melkwegbridge Routes Pedestrians & Cyclists Across a Canal in The Netherlands

December 3, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Arching Melkwegbridge Routes Pedestrians & Cyclists Across a Canal in The Netherlands Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , arched bridge , bride , eco design , green architecture , Green Building , green design , green transportation , melkweg , melkwegbridge , next architects , pedestrian bridge , pedestrian friendly , pedestrian friendly design , purmerend , Sustainable Building , sustainable design , the netherlands , z-shaped bridge

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Arching Melkwegbridge Routes Pedestrians & Cyclists Across a Canal in The Netherlands

Modern Architecture Game Tests Your Knowledge Of The Great Masters

January 31, 2012 by  
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We’re pretty big nerds when it comes to architecture and design, so when we saw this board game over on Archinect this morning, we immediately added it to our wish list. The Modern Architecture Game designed by NEXT Architects pits you head to head against your fellow intellectuals to see who knows the most about architecture and the architects behind their masterpieces. This trivia board game may not help you be a better designer, but at least you’ll be able to prove who has the biggest brain. Read the rest of Modern Architecture Game Tests Your Knowledge Of The Great Masters Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architecture , architecture education , architecture game , board game , green design , modern architecture game , next architects , the modern architecture game

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Modern Architecture Game Tests Your Knowledge Of The Great Masters

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