Trump administration ‘declares war’ on West Coast turtles, dolphins, and whales

June 13, 2017 by  
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Environmentalists say President Donald Trump’s administration has declared war on California marine animals after an announcement this week from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The administration canceled proposed limits on the amount of endangered whales, sea turtles , and dolphins that can be hurt or killed on the West Coast by sword-fishing nets. The proposed limits were backed by the fishing industry and environmentalists. But NOAA said other protections have helped slash the amount of marine creatures that get trapped in the nets – called gill nets – like better training for fishing boat skippers and sound warnings so creatures can leave the area. NOAA Fisheries spokesperson Michael Milstein told the Los Angeles Times, “The cap would have imposed a cost on the industry to solve a problem that has already been addressed.” Related: Unusually high number of humpback whale deaths prompts NOAA inquiry NOAA statistics reveal injuries and deaths for protected whales dropped from over 50 in 1992 to one or two every year by 2015. For common dolphins, the numbers fell from nearly 400 to just a few. But environmentalists disagree. Turtle Island Restoration Network director Todd Steiner said the Trump administration has declared war. He said the drop in numbers is due to the decline in the gill-net fishing fleet in California. He told the Los Angeles Times, “The numbers caught per set have not gone down. The California gill-net fishery kills more marine mammals than all other West Coast fisheries combined.” The restrictions were strong: if two endangered sea turtles or whales were seriously harmed or killed during two years, the gill net fishery would be shuttered for as long as two years. If any combination of four bottlenose dolphins or short-finned pilot whales were hurt or died, the fishery would also be shut down. Center for Biological Diversity senior attorney Catherine Kilduff said rare species are still being killed. And the numbers of some species are so small that the death of just one can be devastating. She told the Los Angeles Times, “Government scientists have said that West Coast fisheries can’t catch more than one leatherback every five years. They estimate that four times that have caught just in the gill-net fishery alone.” Via the Los Angeles Times Images via Salvatore Barbera on Flickr and Wikimedia Commons

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Trump administration ‘declares war’ on West Coast turtles, dolphins, and whales

Thousands take to the streets to march for science in cities around the globe

April 23, 2017 by  
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Tens of thousands of people took to the streets for Saturday’s March for Science , a series of rallies and marches held on Earth Day . With over 600 rallies across the world, the “celebration of science” advocated the use of evidence-based policy making in all levels of government, with climate change a core topic. President Donald Trump administration’s recent budget cuts to many environment-related programs and his perceived hostility to science served as a major spark for the movement. Inspired by the 2017 Women’s March of January 21, 2017, the March for Science amassed large support in a short amount of time thanks largely to social media channels like Facebook and Twitter. Co-led by nonprofit Earth Day Network , the March for Science was officially declared non-political although many protestors used it as an opportunity to protest Trump’s administration. The main march kicked off in the early morning with a mass gathering on Washington D.C.’s National Mall followed by a march down Constitution Avenue toward the Capitol in the afternoon.t Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Hundreds of satellite marches were held around the world on every continent except for Antartica. In D.C., the event was headlined by Bill Nye , Mona Hanna-Attisha, and Lydia Villa-Kmoaroff who, along with other well-known activists in the science community, presented a series of speeches complemented by “teach-ins,” educational sessions that covered topics from climate change to endangered wildlife. Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Related: Why scientists are marching in over 400 cities on Earth Day Many protestors displayed homemade signs with many indirectly and directly attacking Trump with slogans such as “What do Trump and atoms have in common? They make up everything,” “Mr. President, science gave us Romaine,” and “Pruitt Plus Trump Equals Bad Chemistry.” A few hours after the marches kicked off, President Trump released a statement on Saturday saying: “Rigorous science is critical to my administration’s efforts to achieve the twin goals of economic growth and environmental protection. My administration is committed to advancing scientific research that leads to a better understanding of our environment and of environmental risks. As we do so, we should remember that rigorous science depends not on ideology, but on a spirit of honest inquiry and robust debate.” Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images The March for Science was held just a week prior to another major science-related march , the People’s Climate March that will take place in cities across the world on April 29, 2017. + March for Science Lead image via Wikimedia Commons Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images Embed from Getty Images

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Thousands take to the streets to march for science in cities around the globe

Groundbreaking new material for longer-lasting batteries inspired by leaf veins

April 11, 2017 by  
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Biology may hold the clues to better batteries . An international team of scientists designed a porous material inspired by the vascular structure of leaves that could make energy transfers more efficient. Similar to the way leaf veins efficiently transport nutrients, this material could help rechargeable batteries perform better and last longer. A team of researchers led by Xianfeng Zheng of China’s Wuhan University of Technology and Australia’s University of Queensland scrutinized the way leaf veins optimize the flow of nutrients, with minimum energy consumption, “by branching out to smaller scales” according to the University of Cambridge , and then applied that to their groundbreaking porous material. The nature-inspired material could help relieve stresses in battery electrodes that currently limit their lifespan. The material could also enhance the charge and discharge process. Related: American fern inspires groundbreaking new solar storage solution The team calls their product Murray material after Murray’s Law. Cambridge said according to the rule the whole network of pores in biological systems is connected in a manner “to facilitate the transfer of liquids and minimize resistance throughout the network.” Scientist Bao-Lian Su of Cambridge, Wuhan University of Technology, and University of Namur in Belgium said they applied that biological law to chemistry , saying, “The introduction of the concept of Murray’s Law to industrial processes could revolutionize the design of reactors with highly enhanced efficiency, minimum energy, time, and raw material consumption for a sustainable future.” The scientists applied Murray material to gas sensing and photocatalysis as well. Su is a co-author on a paper published online by Nature Communications late last week. There are seven other co-authors on the paper from institutions in China, Australia, the United States, and the United Kingdom. Another co-author, Tawfique Hasan of Cambridge University, said it could be possible to manufacture the porous material on a large scale. Via the University of Cambridge Images via Christoph Rupprecht on Flickr and Pixabay

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Groundbreaking new material for longer-lasting batteries inspired by leaf veins

California hit yet another record high in solar energy generation

July 18, 2016 by  
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In California, the solar power industry is having a field day. For the second time in as many years, the largest electricity grid in the state broke its own solar generation record with 8,030 megawatts (MW) output at 1:06pm local time July 12, 2016. California Independent System Operator (CAISO) reports that is the equivalent of the power consumed by 2 million households. But, ironically, the solar energy generation record doesn’t actually include rooftop solar installations. This new record was met solely with utility-scale solar power. Last week’s record high solar energy generation beats the 2015 record by about 2,000 MW, and is double the high mark reached in 2014. The series of record-breaking highs are indicative of the massive growth of utility-scale solar power in California, as well as its massive number of sunny days. Because of that, CAISO expects the record to be broken time and time again in the months and years to come. Related: California solar energy generation jumped 1,378 percent in five years While CAISO is California’s largest electric utility, it only accounts for around 80 percent of the state’s power grid . CAISO includes the jurisdictions under Pacific Gas and Electric, Southern California Edison, and San Diego Gas and Electric. Smaller municipal utilities like Sacramento Municipal Utility District aren’t included in CAISO’s figures, so the overall solar energy generation for the state is even higher than reported. Interestingly, the peak in solar energy generation is still far off from the state’s electricity demands, reports CleanTechnica.com. Utility-scale solar and other renewables make up approximately “29 percent of the network’s electricity needs,” which “wasn’t even close to the percentage record set earlier this year.” Renewable energy (produced by utility-scale operations) met as much as 54 percent and 56 percent of CAISO’s electricity needs on May 14 and May 15, respectively, although only for portions of each day. Essentially, while the records in energy generation are exciting, there is still a long way to go before California’s clean energy can edge out fossil fuels. Via Clean Technica Images via Shutterstock ( 1 , 2 )

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California hit yet another record high in solar energy generation

How Gogoro will deliver electric scooters to the people who really want them

January 5, 2016 by  
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If you want your own hip and zippy Gogoro electric scooter , now is the time to voice your demand. They’re enormously popular in Taiwan and heading to Amsterdam, and have potential in pretty much any densely-populated urban center in the world. In fact, Gogoro has sold 4,000 of their battery-swapping scooters to date. But because different countries have varying regulations when it comes to scooters, according to CEO Horace Luke, the company has to surmount certain legal hoops before introducing the scooters to further markets. In the meantime, Luke and others devised a clever way to ensure they pursue only the most relevant markets. Which is where you come in. Learn more about the Gogoro OPEN (Owner Proposed Energy Network) Initiative, which allows consumers and businesses to nominate themselves and their communities to be a part of the next market expansion. Read the rest of How Gogoro will deliver electric scooters to the people who really want them

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How Gogoro will deliver electric scooters to the people who really want them

How innovative finance is powering environmental good

November 23, 2015 by  
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Omidyar Network, OpenIDEO, NatureVest and Citi talk market-based finance and big data for social and environmental good.

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How innovative finance is powering environmental good

Aclima’s Davida Herzl on sensor networks making the invisible world visible

November 23, 2015 by  
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At first blush, it may seem like one of those science fiction movies about exploring the fourth dimension, but start-up Aclima is deploying sensor networks that help make “the invisible world around us visible” by describing what is in the air, its CEO told VERGE 2015.Davida Herzl, Aclima co-founder and CEO, described how Aclima is deploying sensor networks in three California metropolitan areas to map the pollutants and air quality in those areas block-by-block, street-by-street and even building-by-building. 

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Aclima’s Davida Herzl on sensor networks making the invisible world visible

Coca-Cola, Apple, Dow see fertile ground for investing in natural capital

November 23, 2015 by  
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A growing number of Fortune 500 companies are investing in natural capital, rather than expensive workaround for offsetting damage to ecosystems.

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Coca-Cola, Apple, Dow see fertile ground for investing in natural capital

Jamaica and how renewables are changing island energy economics

November 23, 2015 by  
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The Caribbean nation is one of several islands experimenting with ways to shift a way from a cycle of economic and logistical dependence on fossil fuels.

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Jamaica and how renewables are changing island energy economics

Gogoro’s battery-swapping Smartscooters are coming to Europe next year

November 17, 2015 by  
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It’s been a whirlwind year for Gogoro – since launching in January the company has rolled out a battery-swapping network in Taipei, sold 3,000 electric Smartscooters , and it recently raised $130 million in additional funding. But Gogoro ‘s next move could be its biggest yet: the company just announced plans to bring its all-electric scooters and energy network to Europe next year, starting with Amsterdam. I chatted with Gogoro CEO Horace Luke about what 2016 holds for the company’s future – find out more after the break. Read the rest of Gogoro’s battery-swapping Smartscooters are coming to Europe next year

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Gogoro’s battery-swapping Smartscooters are coming to Europe next year

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