Beautiful P+R building can house hundreds of bicycles in the Netherlands

March 20, 2017 by  
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Park and ride buildings aren’t often beautiful, but this recently completed facility in Zutphen is a stunning exception. MoederscheimMoonen Architects created the stylish P+R facility near a railway station in the Netherlands’ Noorderhaven district. Built to reference the town’s industrial past, the contemporary building accommodates 375 parking spaces and has spots for over 600 bicycles . Located next to the town’s train station, the unique park and ride structure pays homage to the town’s historic warehouses and traditional industries through its design and choice of materials. One side of the building features a large gabled facade with wooden shutters to mimic the appearance of a factory warehouse. On the other side of the building are two helix-shaped ramps that hide the car’s vertical transport with a sculptural design. In a nod to the nearby steel bridge over the River IJssel, the structure is mounted on a series of “playfully positioned” galvanized columns. Related: Corridor-free high school in the Netherlands bathes students in natural light Ample natural light and ventilation passes through the building due to the slatted facade. The wooden slats were installed at different angles and combined with strips of red steel to create a playful and dynamic appearance. Vertical LED strips illuminate the building at night. + MoederscheimMoonen Architects Images by Harry Noback (HN) and Bart van Hoek (BvH)

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Beautiful P+R building can house hundreds of bicycles in the Netherlands

The Netherlands’ highest wooden apartment building can change its function like a chameleon

January 30, 2017 by  
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The tenants of Patch22, the highest wooden apartment building in the Netherlands, can design and create their own floor plans thanks to the project’s impressive level of flexibility. Architecture firm FRANTZEN et al architecten designed Patch22 with multifunctionality in mind– the team anticipated different future uses so that the building can accommodate housing units or office spaces, depending on circumstances. The building, located in Amsterdam, features a 98-feet high wooden load-bearing structure with wooden columns , beams and walls left exposed in the interior. It meets all the fire regulations and allows occupants to easily reach and reinstall their own installations and pipes depending on the chosen layout. Thanks to a high level of flexibility, Patch22 can be easily transformed from a residential project into an office building. The building generates its own energy thanks to solar panels  installed on its roof. A carbon-neutral heating system uses pellets as fuel to keep the entire building warm. Related: PLP Architecture unveils the design for London’s first timber tower Patch22 is the brainchild of FRANTZEN et al architects and H20 installation consultancy who jointly established Lemniskade Projects to realize the project which won the Sustainability Tender Amsterdam Buiksloterham in 2009. The team has recently acquired a neighboring plot to develop a new project named Top-Up, which will also include an extensive use of wood . While waiting for the new project to break ground next summer, the designers of Patch22 are receiving recognition from the professional community. Patch22 was awarded both the WAN 2016 Residential Award and Green Award. + FRANTZEN et al architecten Via v2com Photos by Luuk Kramer

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The Netherlands’ highest wooden apartment building can change its function like a chameleon

Calming views of the garden alleviate patient anxiety at this modern dental clinic

January 13, 2017 by  
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Imagine staring out at a bucolic scene with birds bouncing around in a field of waving grasses while sitting in the dentist’s chair. It might make the whole experience a little less awful, right? This dental clinic in the Netherlands was designed to make patients feel more relaxed by providing calming views of the garden outside. The light-filled building with a neutral material palette and open-plan layout, designed by Studio Prototype , is part of a cluster of healthcare facilities in the new Huurlingse Dam urban plan in Wichen, in The Netherlands. The building’s sculptural form promises to become a keystone for the neighborhood and provide vistas of the surrounding landscapes. Its clutter-free interior is lit via large openings and a skylights intalled in the central area of the building, above a hallway. Light-stained birch wood furniture and glass dominate both the exterior and interior of the project. Related: Light-filled dentist clinic shows how good design can calm patient fears “The distinctiveness of the sculpture in combination with its freestanding position and sight lines, enhances the open and accessible character of the practice,” said architect Steven Otten. “The open setup of the plan and the large panoramic view towards the garden create a light and spacious place in which the patient feels comfortable,” he added. + Studio Prototype Via Dezeen Photos by Jeroen Musch

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Calming views of the garden alleviate patient anxiety at this modern dental clinic

The Netherlands will spend 150 million Euros to turn cow poop into biogas

November 4, 2016 by  
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Dutch farmers now have the opportunity to turn cow manure into energy . Turning cow poop into power isn’t a new idea , but the Netherlands government is banking on poo being a potent source of power for their country. The country’s Ministry of Economic Affairs will spend 150 million Euros, around $166.5 million, on a cow poo to power project. In the Netherlands, the agriculture industry is responsible for 10 percent of the country’s greenhouse gas emissions . Methane emanating from dairy farms comprises a majority of the offending emissions. Through the economic ministry’s program, Dutch dairy farmers might be able to curb those emissions through leasing anaerobic digesters , which break manure down into biogas with the help of bacteria. A machine inside the farm takes the cow poop to the digester dome outside, and other machines extract phosphates and nitrates farmers can use for fertilizer from the cow dung. Farmers can sell the biogas at a 12-year fixed price which the government will subsidize. Related: Villagers in carbon-hungry Thailand tap the sun and dung for clean energy Dairy farmer Pieter Heeg, who works on his family’s 75-hectare farm, is among the farmers who will turn poo into power with anaerobic digesters. He told The Guardian he anticipates making 10,000 Euros, or over $11,000, every year selling the biogas. His farm used to simply spread manure across their land, but now they’ll be able to obtain energy for their own use and extra income. In 20 days, the Heeg farm generated 9,342 kilowatt hours of electricity using an anaerobic digester, enough to provide a year’s worth of power for three homes. Huge dairy collective FrieslandCampina, which purchases milk from 13,500 of 17,000 Dutch dairy farmers, is also behind the project. Their goal is for 1,000 big farms in the Netherlands to turn poo to power through the program in the next four years. Via The Guardian Images via U.S. Department of Agriculture on Flickr and Wikimedia Commons

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The Netherlands will spend 150 million Euros to turn cow poop into biogas

This electricity-free LED lamp is powered by living bacteria

November 3, 2016 by  
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Dutch designer Teresa van Dongen has unveiled a fascinating LED pendant lamp that is powered by living, electrochemically-active bacteria. Called “Spark of Light,” this lamp builds on van Dongen’s previous work harnessing bioluminescent bacteria. The lamp is completely self-contained, and can operate without a plug or batteries. However, the organisms within do need to be fed to continue producing light. The spherical lamp is made of four separate compartments containing the bacteria . As long as they’re happy and healthy, these microorganisms constantly give off small electrical currents. An electrode within each section captures these currents and powers the LEDs in the center of the light. Van Dongen explained in an interview with Dezeen that as long as a teaspoon of acetate is added to the fluid within the lamp every two weeks, the light will continue to glow without any additional electricity, 24 hours a day. Every few months, the vessels within the lamp must be cleaned and refilled with tap water, salt, and vitamins. Related: The Electricity-Free Biobulb Uses Bacteria to Glow in the Dark The Spark of Life is just the latest zero-electricity lighting product van Dongen has developed. It should come as no surprise that she studied biology before deciding to pursue a design education in Eindhoven. With any luck, this innovative lamp will soon be available as a consumer product and not just a prototype. The pendant was showcased last month during 2016 Dutch Design Week. + Teresa van Dongen Via Dezeen

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This electricity-free LED lamp is powered by living bacteria

Solar-powered Vreugdenhil office earns BREEAM-NL Outstanding for its low energy footprint

November 3, 2016 by  
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Triangular in plan, Vreugdenhil’s new head office is built like a work of art that eschews hard corners for rounded edges for a sculptural appearance. Curved glazing wraps around the building to let in copious amounts of natural light that reflect off the mostly white interior surfaces. The office’s most eye-catching feature is the grand spiraling staircase that wraps around a live tree in the center and ascends a light-filled triangular atrium . The office spaces that branch off of the staircase are flexible and designed to encourage employees to socialize and collaborate. Related: Zaha Hadid Architects renovate a derelict fire station into Antwerp’s new BREEAM-rated port headquarters In addition to incorporating natural light to minimize dependence on electricity, the energy-efficient building also includes an intelligent climate control system, a 170-panel solar array system, rainwater collection reused to flush the toilets, and a thermal energy storage system that heats and cools the building. The new office’s comfortable and attractive environment is also aimed to help the company reach its 2020 target to reduce the absenteeism rate to below 4%. + Maas Architecten Via ArchDaily Images via Maas Architecten

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Solar-powered Vreugdenhil office earns BREEAM-NL Outstanding for its low energy footprint

The Dutch Mountains is the ‘interactive work and residential environment of the future’

November 1, 2016 by  
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Perhaps the most notable aspect of the Dutch Mountains design is its shape. From the outside, it recalls the hull of an enormous ship just launched into a body of water, with either end curving upward to a height of 147 feet. An aerial view reveals that the building surrounds a private green space spanning nearly 43,000 square feet. There, workers and residents can relax in a park-like setting, hold outdoor meetings, or enjoy a picnic on the shore of a man-made pond—all while protected from the noise and pollution of the major highway running adjacent to the proposed site. The park is visible from all of the development’s amenities, offering a pleasant view of nature as opposed to looking out onto other buildings. Related: New Dutch housing model lets students stay at a senior living home for free The Dutch Mountains features a 52,000-square-foot lobby, which houses the reception area for offices upstairs. The entrance to restaurants, conference venues, a health club, an indoor swimming pool , a supermarket, and an exhibition space are also located on this level. Beyond the lobby is close to 100,000 square feet of office space, laboratories, and hotel rooms. The Dutch Mountains’ ideal tenants include large businesses as well as startups, as the building is designed to be flexible to the needs of each company. The mixed use project is proposed for De Run in the municipality of Veldhoven, in the Eindhoven area. The Dutch Mountains will support the claim that Eindhoven is the “smartest region in the world” by housing the Brainport Experience Center where business come to present their latest innovations. Also included in the plans are a field lab for innovative construction and energy technology, and a garden for food production. + Studio Marco Vermeulen + BLOC Images via Studio Marco Vermeulen

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The Dutch Mountains is the ‘interactive work and residential environment of the future’

Designer Woojai Lee recycles newspaper into "marbled" furniture

October 26, 2016 by  
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Paper is among the most produced and discarded materials in the world. It can be recycled, but through each cycle it loses quality as the fibers grow smaller. That’s why Eindhoven -based Korean designer Woojai Lee decided to turn discarded newspaper into a new building material instead. The project includes small tables and benches, as well as bricks that look like concrete masonry units and can be cut, milled and sanded just like regular wood. Related: NewspaperWood – Incredible Furnishings and Products Made From Recycled Newspaper The material is made by first turning newspaper into pulp , and then mixing it with wood glue and molding it into shape. After setting, the bricks are taken out of the molds to dry and then sanded to create smooth edges. The resulting 2-inch-thick bricks measure 4 inches wide by 11.8 inches long and boast a unique marbled look that the warmth and soft tactility of paper. We spotted Woojai Lee’s ‘Paper Bricks’ at the Design Academy of Eindhoven ‘s Graduation Show during Dutch Design Week , held in the Netherlands from 22-30 October, 2016. + Woojai Lee + Design Academy of Eindhoven + Dutch Design Week Photos by Ana Lisa Alperovich for Inhabitat, Woojai Lee and Angeline Swinkels | fotograaf

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Designer Woojai Lee recycles newspaper into "marbled" furniture

Futuristic Dutch community features 50 out-of-this world spherical homes

October 6, 2016 by  
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Kreijkamp initially designed the bulbous Bolwoningen in the 1970s, in response to a special Dutch subsidy for experimental housing projects that launched in 1968. The decidedly suburban neighborhood in Maaspoort in the city of Den Bosch (formally known as ‘s-Hertogenbosch) is home to this extraterrestrial cluster of apartment homes. Inside each golf-ball shaped home is a compact apartment dwelling with a uniquely otherworldly feel. The curved walls and round porthole windows give the illusion you’re living in a spaceship, which is a little ironic because Kreijkamp actually intended the globe-like structures to bring people closer to nature , with its vantage points from nearly every angle. Related: 3D-printed micro cabin in Amsterdam welcomes anyone to spend the night Each apartment home contains three floors, with bedrooms on the ground level and a bathroom hidden on the middle floor. The upper floor houses the main living room and compact kitchen, and round windows face outward in nearly every direction, offering unique views of the world outside (including the other globe-shaped apartments, which are positioned somewhat close together). At the top floor, each home has a diameter of just 18 feet (5.5 meters), making for a cozy living space . Across the street, another subdivision is filled with traditional-style homes, highlighting the rarity of the globe-shaped apartment community. Kreijkamp passed away in 2014, but the continued fascination with what his perhaps his greatest contribution to architecture lives on. The Bolwoningen apartment community is still in good condition some 30 years after its completion, and has, as far as we can tell, been continuously occupied from the start and will continue to provide funky dwelling space for years to come. Via Ignant Images via Wikipedia, Steven Vance/Flickr and unknown (aerial shot)

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Futuristic Dutch community features 50 out-of-this world spherical homes

Finlands longest bridge will be a beautiful pedestrian and cyclist superhighway

September 27, 2016 by  
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The architects collaborated with engineering firm WSP Finland to design this tram, cyclist and pedestrian bridge, the name of which translates to Crown Bridges in Finnish. The €259 million project will cross Helsinki ‘s Kruunuvuorensilta bay and connect the new Kruunuvuorenranta housing development to the city center. Related: Sunken Pedestrian Bridge in the Netherlands Parts Moat Waters Like Moses! Tensioned cable stays will support the upper part of the structure featuring an elevated walkway and tram tracks . The central, 442-feet-tall pylon has a diamond-like shape that references the crown. The project is expected to break ground in late 2018 and become open to the public in 2025. + Knight Architects + WSP Finland Via Dezeen

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Finlands longest bridge will be a beautiful pedestrian and cyclist superhighway

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