Mexico City is sinking – and it’s going to cause some real problems

February 20, 2017 by  
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Mexico City , a scant mile and a half above sea level, is sinking. It’s a turn of events that shouldn’t surprise anyone with a rudimentary grasp of history. Established by the Aztecs in 1325, the city formerly known as Tenochtitlán occupies what was once a plexus of interconnected lakes that were first drained by the Spaniards, then paved over with concrete and steel by modern engineers. As a result, Mexico City has to dig deep—literally—to obtain fresh water for its 21 million residents. But the drilling weakens the brittle clay beds that serve as the city’s foundation, according to the New York Times , hastening the collapse even further. For Mexico City, climate change isn’t a game of partisan ping-pong. Per the Times : More heat and drought mean more evaporation and yet more demand for water, adding pressure to tap distant reservoirs at staggering costs or further drain underground aquifers and hasten the city’s collapse. In the immense neighborhood of Iztapalapa — where nearly two million people live, many of them unable to count on water from their taps — a teenager was swallowed up where a crack in the brittle ground split open a street. Sidewalks resemble broken china, and 15 elementary schools have crumbled or caved in. Related: Xomali House in Mexico City makes clever use of a tiny 115 square foot lot Rising temperatures and the increased incidence of droughts and floods could send millions of Mexicans fleeing north and “heightening already extreme political tensions over immigration.” At the same time, Mexico City is facing a water crisis that prevents nearly 20 percent of its residents from getting water from their faucets each day. People have had to resort to hiring trucks to deliver drinking water, sometimes at prices 10 times higher than what richer neighborhoods with more reliable plumbing have to pay. “Climate change is expected to have two effects,” Ramón Aguirre Díaz, director of the Water System of Mexico City, told the Times . “We expect heavier, more intense rains, which means more floods, but also more and longer droughts.” If rain stops filling the reservoirs, “there is no way we can provide enough trucks of water to deal with that scenario,” he added. Mexico City could still rally some long-term solutions, but like most places, the city is roiled by political infighting. “There has to be a consensus—of scientists, politicians, engineers and society—when it comes to pollution, water, climate,” said Claudia Sheinbaum, a former environment minister. “We have the resources, but lack the political will.” Via New York Times

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Mexico City is sinking – and it’s going to cause some real problems

How She Leads: Candace "CT" Taylor-Anderson of Belk

March 17, 2016 by  
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Belk is a family owned and operated department store chain, which, despite its size — 300 stores spread across 16 states and employing 25,000 people — holds onto its community focus. It prides itself on being part of the neighborhoods where it does business, participating in fashion-show fundraisers and beach clean-ups.

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How She Leads: Candace "CT" Taylor-Anderson of Belk

GE, Cisco bank on smart lighting going mainstream

March 17, 2016 by  
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Banking giant JPMorgan Chase commits to one of the biggest U.S. installations yet — a boon for their lighting providers and the industry at large.

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GE, Cisco bank on smart lighting going mainstream

Microsensors help map crowdsourced pollution data

June 26, 2013 by  
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Entrepreneurs are using wireless microsensors and smart databases to help people track air quality in their neighborhoods.

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Microsensors help map crowdsourced pollution data

Houston and Palo Alto chart aggressive course for green power

June 26, 2013 by  
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Houston has become the country's largest municipal renewables buyer, while Palo Alto is on track to get half of its energy from green sources.

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Houston and Palo Alto chart aggressive course for green power

TWTC: Grassroots Recycling in Atlanta

December 14, 2009 by  
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Rhonda and I have gotten to talking, and it turns out that despite living on opposite sides of the country, our neighborhoods have a lot in common. She lives in the Bayview area of San Francisco, CA and I’m living in Edgewood, just east of downtown in Atlanta, GA.

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TWTC: Grassroots Recycling in Atlanta

300 Million-Year-Old Limestone Cave to Cool Data

December 14, 2009 by  
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After a good 20,000 years out of caves, we are heading back to them – and just like your worst fears, it’s the damn global warmers and Al Gore-ists leading the way, because it saves so much energy. It turns out that limestone caverns might be the cheapest and best option for carbon neutral data-center cooling , because by nature limestone can absorb 1.5 BTUs per square foot for free. And data centers need lots of energy for cooling.

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300 Million-Year-Old Limestone Cave to Cool Data

Two Women, Two Coasts, One Idea

November 16, 2009 by  
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Rhonda and I have gotten to talking, and it turns out that despite living on opposite sides of the country, our neighborhoods have a lot in common.

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Two Women, Two Coasts, One Idea

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