Tiny pod-like home balances on single concrete pillar

January 26, 2017 by  
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Although typical country homes tend to blend into their natural surroundings, some are just made to stand out. Built by Prague-based architect Jan Sepka , House in the Orchard is a concrete-clad tiny home set on a single concrete pillar in the middle of a green field, looking as if it just plopped down from outer space. Although the tiny home design may look extremely contemporary, its concept was inspired by the natural green surroundings. The inclined slope of the landscape led the design’s unique volume and support. From most angles, the home appears to be floating above the green space, but there is a steel footbridge that leads to the entrance from the other side. Related: Romantic Treehouse huts are tucked away in Beijing’s tranquil mountains Although completely supported by a reinforced-concrete foundation, the home has a timber frame , which was designed digitally. A light natural wood makes up the interior walls and the sloped double height ceiling, which gives the compact area a surprisingly spacious feel. Thanks to a large window, the living space is naturally lit and a small fireplace is used for heating. The master bedroom is located on the second floor, which leads to a private office space with stunning views of the surrounding landscape. + ŠÉPKA ARCHITEKTI Via Archdaily Photography by Tomáš Malý

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Tiny pod-like home balances on single concrete pillar

Take refuge in this off-grid bungalow tucked into the lush Mexican forest

January 23, 2017 by  
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If you’re looking for a stunning off-grid escape, Cadaval & Solà-Morales architects are creating a lovely remote paradise in the quiet town of Tepoztlán, about 50 km outside of Mexico City. The international firm has just unveiled LMM Bungalow, a compact hut strategically tucked into the lush forest overlooking the valley. Visitors to the minimalistic refuge will be able to enjoy the serene environment along with a relaxing lounge area and pool, also designed by the Spanish architects. The modernistic hut is designed to be a relaxing sojourn for anyone wanting to escape the hustle and bustle of Mexico DF.  The small structure is built into a concrete base tucked into the steep slope of the terrain. Open air platforms extend from the interior space through floor-to-ceiling glass doors, creating a seamless connection from the interior to the exterior. The structure is painted a matte black to minimize its visual impact on the surrounding green landscape. Related: Rescued 1927 Austin bungalow gets new life as a sweet new solar-powered home To create a division between the interior spaces, the architects choose to break the rectangular volume by “folding” the exterior glass wall inwards. This technique physically separates the living area from the master bedroom, without forsaking the natural light that floods both of spaces. Along with creating extra privacy, vegetation is allowed to grow in the open space, further fusing the natural surroundings into the interior. + Cadaval & Solà-Morales Via Architonic Photography by Diego Berruecos  

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Take refuge in this off-grid bungalow tucked into the lush Mexican forest

How mimicking marine mollusks flooded this circular home with natural light

March 4, 2016 by  
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Folly by archaus’ prefab skin was inspired by sunlight filtering through leaves

August 4, 2015 by  
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Folly is a conceptual house design aimed at provoking a debate around the housing vernacular in New Zealand; impregnating the public with the idea that creativity, innovation and personality in the built form can be accomplished in New Zealand. The challenging site called for an innovative house design that sits below road level and is pinned down into the landscape. Wellington-based firm  archaus  began the design with a truss system that formed triangular gaps between structural elements, creating a structural skin that can be lifted onto site. The triangular glazing openings morphed into organic curved shapes inspired by the sun shining through the gaps of the surrounding leaves, forming a beautiful yet random pattern that allows natural light into the house and permitted the structural lines of the original truss to cohabit with the organic pattern. + archaus The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link. Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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Folly by archaus’ prefab skin was inspired by sunlight filtering through leaves

Studio 505?s Textured Wintergarden Facade in Brisbane is Inspired by Nature

July 27, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Studio 505′s Textured Wintergarden Facade in Brisbane is Inspired by Nature Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architecture , australia , brisbane , Brisbane shopping mall , facade , green facade , laser cut facade , nature inspired , stainless steel facade , studio 505 , Wintergarden

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Studio 505?s Textured Wintergarden Facade in Brisbane is Inspired by Nature

Studio 505?s Textured Wintergarden Facade in Brisbane is Inspired by Nature

July 27, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Studio 505′s Textured Wintergarden Facade in Brisbane is Inspired by Nature Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architecture , australia , brisbane , Brisbane shopping mall , facade , green facade , laser cut facade , nature inspired , stainless steel facade , studio 505 , Wintergarden

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Studio 505?s Textured Wintergarden Facade in Brisbane is Inspired by Nature

Walter Mason Uses Nature’s Gifts To Create Striking Land Art

January 9, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Walter Mason Uses Nature’s Gifts To Create Striking Land Art Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Art , eco-art , green art , green design , land art , Nature , nature inspired , nature inspired design , nature’s design , organic art , walter mason

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5 Eco friendly technologies that are inspired by nature

September 15, 2011 by  
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Babina Laishram: Nature Inspired Technologies Nature Inspired Technologies Necessity is the mother of all inventions. In an overcrowded world with limited resources, everything that man does has an impact on the environment. So in a world besieged by this reality all solutions to man made problems have to be environmentally friendly. And technology that seek to fulfill our needs constantly turns to the bounteous nature for inspiration. Nature being the greatest inspiration of all has solutions to all problems big and small which threaten mankind. Here are the five eco friendly technologies that are inspired by mother nature. 1. Energy Forest Energy Forest Energy Forest Nature Inspired Technology Wouldn’t it be great if by harnessing the wind and solar energy an entire forest were to be used to produce clean energy? Jaewon Sim, an industrial designer, has conceptualized the Energy Forest, a forest made up of natural and artificial plants that would generate clean energy. The forest would have power plants that generate electricity using solar and wind power. This energy would be used to recharge electric vehicles or power the grid. The forest would also have mechanisms to harvest rain water and this stored water would be used to irrigate the natural plants. The Energy Forest would not only generate clean energy but would also be self sufficient. The forest would also have EV recharge stations so designed to double as chairs. 2. Self cleaing solar panels Self cleaing solar panels Self cleaing solar panels We have the story of how King Robert the Bruce was inspired to try again and again by a humble spider. Here we are talking of a technology that is also inspired by spiders. The insect’s ability to remain dry and clean in spite of rain and dirt have inspired a group of scientists at the University of Florida to recreate the water phobic properties of the spider’s body. The scientists have been able to reproduce the spider hair patterns and shapes to create a water phobic surface. When water falls on such a surface it not only rolls off the surface but also carries the dirt away with it and in the process cleaning the surface. This technology will be used in making self-cleaning solar panels and windows. 3. Adaptable Polymer Inspired By Sea Cucumbers Adaptable Polymer Adaptable Polymer Inspired By Sea Cucumbers Sea cucumbers have for ages been sought as food but a group of scientists are seeking sea cucumbers not as food but as an inspiration. Researchers at Case Western University, Cleveland, have created a bio-polymer that has the unique property of softening when exposed to water based solvents but hardening as the solvent evaporates. This remarkable bio-polymer has been created by using materials that is inspired by sea cucumbers. The leader of this project, Professor Christoph Weder says that such a substance will be useful in the design of brain activity recording implants, as the use of this material can substantially reduce scarring compared to conventional implantable electrodes. 4. Lotus Leaf-Inspired Nanotechnology Lotus Leaf-Inspired Nanotechnology Lotus Leaf-Inspired Nanotechnology The lotus has for ages been a symbol of purity not only in the culture of India and Japan but also in China and Myanmar as well. With its roots in mud a lotus blooms in pristine beauty and cleanliness seldom muddied. Beliefs aside, millions of microscopic bumps on the surface of the lotus leaf turn it into an extremely hydrophobic material from which water drops roll off removing dirt too. For years, scientists have been awed and inspired by the “lotus effect”. Wilhelm Barthlott, the discoverer and developer of this effect has a vision of a world where surfaces would self clean. Scientists, Michael Rubner and Robert Cohen of MIT envisage a similar world with technologies to control the flow of microfluidic components. 5. Solar Lilly Pads Solar Lilly Pads Floating Energy Collector Solar energy is one of the cleanest forms of energy and man has used solar panels to harness this energy. Of late, the use of solar energy as a dependable energy source has exponentially grown and today we see open fields, rooftops lined with solar panels. Efforts are also underway to harness every bit of sunlight that falls on the surface of water bodies. In Sonoma County, an irrigation pond is covered with 144 solar panels that are fitted on top of pontoons. Another such assembly of 994 solar panels cover a pond in Napa Valley. These are but ideas inspired by the lily pads, nature’s own design of harnessing the solar energy on water surface.

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5 Eco friendly technologies that are inspired by nature

How Nature Inspired the Alphabet

March 14, 2010 by  
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32,000 years, ancient humans gathered in a cave in Lascaux, France, where, by firelight, they created the first hand-drawn forms–scenes depicting man’s relationship with the natural world . The favorite subject in those first drawings was the ancient ox , so impressive in stature and strength, that it was deified by our earliest ancestors. This reverence for nature remained as civilizations formed, and with it, written language

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How Nature Inspired the Alphabet

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