Natural DIY Treatments for Luscious Winter Lips

January 7, 2022 by  
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The combination of cold winter weather outside and heated rooms inside takes a toll on… The post Natural DIY Treatments for Luscious Winter Lips appeared first on Earth911.

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Natural DIY Treatments for Luscious Winter Lips

French wood house builds a connection with its environment

October 29, 2021 by  
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The PRS House in Mereville, France , a 150 square meter of living space, is an answer to sustainability. The design brought forward by Quinze Architecture does not only bring humanity close to nature, but also retains nature in its pristine form. The first and most impressive fact about the PRS house is its location. The choice of having a living space sandwiched within the woods might be questionable to others, but a view of the PRS would change that perception. It is not an Australopithecus living home, but rather a modern space designed to correspond to natural spaces. Its shape and volume also make it look as if it was part of the natural features that grew with the land. Related: Bamboo Pavilion brings people together with natural design The other notable feature is its proximity to water. Being at the center of a valley with a river below, the views are breathtaking. The beauty of it all is that neither the structure of the house, nor the materials used to build it, impact the natural environment. Considering the location and the house’s need for power, the designers positioned it in a North-South alignment. The fully glazed roof is perfect for collecting the sun rays and converting the energy into power to be used in the house. The beauty of all the materials used in the building is that they are bio-sourced. In other words, they are biodegradable and do not introduce any foreign matter to the environment. The entire building is built out of wood sourced from the region where it is constructed. Additionally, it reduces the carbon footprint associated with concrete production. The wood used gives the building its aesthetic beauty both on the outside and the inside. The light wood used on the walls and windows cuts down the cost of construction . Most importantly, the wood helps keep the building warm, reducing the need for artificial warming and cooling. For a modern masterpiece, the PRS is an ideal living space that can suit any modern family . It has two floors, with the ground floor containing the living room, dining room and kitchen. The upper living space is home to private areas such as the master bedroom and bathrooms. + Quinze Architecture Photography by Mathieu Fiol

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French wood house builds a connection with its environment

6 things to do with your fall leaves

October 26, 2021 by  
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‘Tis the season of colorful landscapes, on the trees and on the ground. While you may have a native hillside that flows through the cycles of the seasons without intervention, if you have a lawn with trees, the season equates to clean up time to avoid patchy grass caused by wet, matted leaves when spring rolls around. Although removing leaves is a part of autumn chores, you can choose to send them straight to the yard debris cart, bag them up for waste removal or give the leaves a second life around your home. Here are some inspiring ways to make the most of this fall’s natural material. Compost If you don’t already have a compost pile, fall is the perfect time to start. You don’t need to have a fancy compost bin, although it can harness the contents and increase efficiency. The process works naturally even if all you do is throw compost layers in the corner of the yard. Just remember it will break down best with thin layers of different kinds of materials. Include green layers such as grass clipping and organic material from the kitchen like vegetable peelings and wilted lettuce .  Related: 12 things you should never compost Mulching Trees store much of their nutrient base in their leaves. By using your leaves as a mulch, those nutrients transfer to the soil and other plants , contributing to the cycle of nature. Instead of using large leaves, chop them smaller by using the mulch setting on your lawn mower. Simply “leaf” them on the ground and drive over them with the mower set a few inches above the ground. If the leaves are finely mulched, you can leave them on the grass as an additive for the growth period in the spring. However, any clumps of leaves will result in bald spots so make sure the mulch is lightly applied.  Leaf mulch can also be used to amend the soil in your garden beds. Apply it along with any fall fertilizers to balance out the nutrients. This will attract earthworms who will do the rest of the work in breaking down the materials into a rich soil for next season.  Also, apply leaf mulch to flower beds. This natural layer helps moderate ground temperature and water absorption. Plus, they do a great job of suppressing weed growth. Again, it’s best to run large leaves through a mulcher first. Use the leaf mulch around trees, berries, flowers, shrubs and other plants.  Thanksgiving table décor Bringing the outdoors in is a quintessential part of the Thanksgiving tradition. Make a centerpiece with a carved out gourd or pumpkin as a candle holder and surround it with colorful dried leaves. Use more dried leaves to make placemats for family and guests. Simply cut a rectangle of clear shelf liner and press leaves onto the sticky side. Add names, kids’ handprints cut out of paper, stickers or other decorations and then cover with a top sheet, pressing the two pieces together. You can also have the kids help make place markers by writing guests names on dried leaves.  Another option for the centerpiece is to decoupage leaves to the outside of a canning jar. Adorn it with a ribbon made from a natural material like jute and place a candle inside.   Wreaths Leaves are easy to source and easy to use for DIY wreath making. Create a circular wreath made entirely of leaves by feeding a needle with thread through the center of dozens of mostly-dried leaves. Once you’ve completed a long strand, use wire or rope to attach it to a wire wreath form.  For a different look, use large or small leaves to design a wreath by laying them flat on the form. Overlap the leaves as you work around the circle . Then adorn the leaf base with burlap ribbon, dried berries or other natural materials.  Make a banner Dried leaves can be decorated any number of ways with markers, paints or layers of natural color from other leaves. Have a leaf-decorating party and display your fanciful creation by attaching them to a piece of rope with clothespins. Hang your dangling creation across the mantle or above the dining table.  You can also make a banner by cutting felt pieces into banner shapes or simply using fall-colored paper . To each piece attach pinecones, leaves, twigs and acorns into the shape of letters, with the final banner spelling out “Thanks” or “Thanksgiving.” Attach the pieces together by punching holes in the top to feed through rope or yarn.  Stuff a scarecrow The outdoors might need a little seasonal attention too. Keep the leaves close to their source and spook away the wildlife with a scarecrow in your yard. Once you have the basic design in place, stuff your scarecrow’s clothing with copious amounts of leaves until you achieve the bulk you’re looking for. Top it with a burlap sack or paper bag, also stuffed with leaves, for the head.  Via DoItYourself , The Old Farmer’s Almanac , The Spruce   Images via Pexels

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6 things to do with your fall leaves

Crayfish interbreeding causing the extinction of native species

October 12, 2021 by  
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In a new study conducted by Illinois Natural History Survey , scientists discovered by chance that the virile crayfish species , faxonius virilis, are interbreeding with native crayfish in the Current River in Missouri, leading to disruptions in the ecosystem. The study, published in the Journal Aquatic Invasions, also mentioned the species are going through biological inversion that may lead to the extinction of native species. Christopher Taylor, a curator of crustaceans at the Illinois Natural History Survey and coauthor of the study, found that the virile crayfish is one of the “widest-ranging native crayfish in North America .” Even though it is native to North America, the virile species is considered invasive in most parts of the U.S. It eventually dominates other species in every territory it is introduced. Related: Dramatic decline in population of Lake Tahoe’s tiniest creatures is changing the entire ecosystem Taylor conducted the study with other researchers including Professor Eric Larson of the Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences department at the University of Illinois.“The Ozarks in Missouri and Arkansas are just a great place to be a crayfish,” Larson said. “The streambeds are rocky so you can hide from fish predators, the water chemistry is good, there’s lots of calcium in the stream and there are a lot of groundwater springs that feed into the main river. That’s why there are so many native crayfish there.”The problem with crayfish interbreeding is that the hybrid species displace the native ones. This, in turn, reduces the production of native crayfish and cuts down their reproduction. Furthermore, the hybrid species consume large quantities of aquatic plants and other invertebrates. As a result, interbreeding ends up affecting the populations of other small fish and species in the ecosystem .“The spread and impacts of an invasive species could cause substantial harm to this unique ecosystem,” Larson said.The researchers found it was difficult to determine that the crayfish species were interbreeding since their offspring did not have unique physical appearances. It was only through mitochondrial DNA sampling that the researchers identified traces of the unique DNA within each other.“Initially, we were finding that some of the native spot-handed crayfish, faxonius punctimanus, had mitochondrial DNA sequences that were aligning with invasive virile crayfish,” said Zachary Rozansky, a graduate student who led the research. “We did not observe any differences in colors or patterns indicating they were hybrids . They looked like one or the other.” Via Newswise Lead image via Unsplash

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Crayfish interbreeding causing the extinction of native species

A mosaic of solutions for one-planet prosperity

October 4, 2021 by  
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The bad news: We are rapidly depleting the natural systems upon which all life relies. The good news: We’re awash with solutions.

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A mosaic of solutions for one-planet prosperity

Natural Pod furniture takes a different approach to learning

September 9, 2021 by  
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Education is a universal issue. Bridgitte Alomes, the founder and CEO of Natural Pod, has her own approach to learning . She created an idea book designed for Indigenous learners. Her idea blends creative learning, play-based curriculums and Indigenous teaching philosophies. The “Indigenous Learners Ideabook” has solutions for creative learning environments using natural, sustainably harvested wood furniture. In Alomes’s words, “sustainability is built into everything we do.” Related: Heirloom Design provides furniture that may never see a landfill When Alomes’s son had a bad reaction to the environment where he was learning, she started to think about the materials inside classrooms . What are the potential risks to children learning in environments filled with manufactured, heavily processed items and potentially outdated building practices? What’s in the paint on the walls? What are the desks where your child sits made of? What chemicals are used to clean these buildings? There are a lot of factors that go into creating a learning environment. Once you start asking questions about that environment, the answers can get a little scary. This is how Natural Pod began. Alomes started Natural Pod to create natural furniture specifically made for learning environments. The furniture is designed with children in mind. Based in British Columbia, Canada , Natural Pod furniture is made with natural wood. All the wood comes from trees harvested using Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified source material. Natural Pod’s products are also all ethically manufactured and made with soy -based adhesives and non-toxic varnishes. The entire process is geared toward sustainable construction and eco-responsibility. Products are made to order, not as a mass production. They’re also packed in custom-built crates so orders can be flat-packed. This helps Natural Pod minimize waste . The brand focuses on grades K-12, as well as school principals, teachers and district leaders. During the pandemic , Natural Pod also consulted with schools to help reconfigure learning environments. + Natural Pod Images via Natural Pod

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Natural Pod furniture takes a different approach to learning

How the private sector can finance the climate and land use transition

July 27, 2021 by  
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Natural climate solutions offer us up to one-third of the solutions required to meet the climate change goals by 2030. The Natural Climate Solutions Alliance offers valuable guidance for businesses looking to invest.

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How the private sector can finance the climate and land use transition

A mini rainforest thrives in the Nanbo Bay Reception Center

July 19, 2021 by  
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In Yinchuan Shi, China , Nanbo Bay Reception Center by Sunson Design is an example of striking architecture that intertwines nature with comfort and eye-catching appeal. The center sits adjacent to China Yinchuan Cultural Park, which is backed by wetlands that appear to have inspired much of the feng shui flow inside the building. The experience begins at the entrance, dubbed the “hall of time.” Here, visitors their first impression of the natural yet mysterious space, which is bathed in  plants . In fact, the Reception Hall is a mini ecological rainforest with bamboo, banyan trees, plantains and other fresh green plants and low shrubs. This environment invites guests to slow down and look around, enjoying the natural elements while gradually progressing through the space. Related: Sino-Italian Cultural Exchange City Reception Center is a hidden art hall in China Copious natural light streams in from innovative sky windows overhead, ranging from a spectacularly engaging grilled design to extraordinary skylight effects. The marriage between the outdoors and indoors leaves visitors questioning if they are actually in a building at all.  Moving into the adjacent sand table display area, visitors meet more  natural materials  in the form of floor-to-ceiling stone walls and copious wood accents. Also off the reception hall is an expansive library and sitting area with tables spaced throughout a tiered stairway. On the opposite side of a built-in bookshelf wall sits a bar. The bookshelf itself is filled with discussion-worthy pieces paying homage to ancient Yinchuan. Throughout the dining area,  wood  tables and chairs, wallpaper printed in food designs, and bamboo screens continue the ecological theme.  Nanbo Bay Reception Center also features a landscaped courtyard, awe-inspiring sculptures, and a glass-walled swimming pool area that creates the visual illusion of “zero gravity” for a floating effect. These spaces work together to join the elements of  water , stone, light, music and plants. + Sunson Design Photography by Kanghui Zeng

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A mini rainforest thrives in the Nanbo Bay Reception Center

Killer heatwaves threaten US farmworkers

July 19, 2021 by  
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People are suffering from heat waves around the U.S., but many can find relief indoors with air conditioning. Not so for farmworkers who, according to  CDC  data, are 20 times more likely than other workers to die from heat-related causes. Now, some advocacy groups are trying to get federal protection from workplace heat exposure. “It would be really good to have a broad rule so when farm owners see that temperatures are way too high they need to stop and allow people to rest,” said farmworker Tere Cruz, as reported by The Guardian. “Things as they are right now, you can see when it’s really hot that by 1 or 2 in the afternoon, people just can’t  work  any more. But there’s this real pressure to keep working and keep working.” Too often, bosses don’t take no for an answer and continue to push workers. Related: A billion intertidal animals roasted in BC heat wave Last month, 38-year-old Sebastián Francisco Pérez collapsed and died at an Oregon tree farm during a heatwave. The Guatemalan man’s heat exposure death spurred the state of Washington to announce new emergency rules protecting farm and other outdoor workers with some heat protection. The only other two U.S. states with heat-related worker protections are California and Minnesota. Colorado has made some limited moves in this direction. “It’s extremely hot out there and it’s getting worse every year,” said Nezahualcoyotl Xiuhtecutli, general coordinator of the Farmworker Association of  Florida , as reported by The Guardian. “One of the biggest problems is the way that farm workers are paid. When they’re paid by the piece rate, that encourages workers to exert themselves even more. When they’re part of a crew, the person who slows down because he has to take a water break or use the restroom, then they become the guy who slows down the crew.” And it’s only getting worse. June 2021 was the U.S.’s hottest June on record. Last year, University of Washington researchers predicted that the number of days U.S. farmworkers will labor in unsafe temperatures will nearly triple by 2100, from an average of 21 days per harvest season to 62 days. Via The Guardian Lead image via Pixabay

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Killer heatwaves threaten US farmworkers

6 Must-Try Green Subscription Box Services

October 31, 2017 by  
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More subscription box service firms specializing in green and natural … The post 6 Must-Try Green Subscription Box Services appeared first on Earth911.com.

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6 Must-Try Green Subscription Box Services

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