US Forest Service allows Nestl to continue taking water from California national forest

June 29, 2018 by  
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The U.S. Forest Service has offered Nestlé Waters North America a three-year permit on water rights in the San Bernardino National Forest , allowing the company to continue to take millions of gallons of water from the site. Under the proposed agreement, Nestlé would draw from the Strawberry Creek watershed “when there is water available consistent with the forest’s Land Management Plan” for its various bottled water brands, including Arrowhead. If California returns to severe drought conditions, the Forest Service could further limit natural resource access. The Forest Service says it will work with the Swiss company to study the watershed and determine future management plans. The watershed is currently rated as Class Three “Impaired Function,” the worst watershed functionality class. An “impaired” watershed exceeds “physical, hydrological or biological thresholds,” with major changes needed to restore the watershed to functioning status. Related: The growing wine industry is threatening California’s Napa Valley “[The decision ensures] the water withdrawal and conveyance infrastructure is under a current permit,” U.S. Forest Service District Ranger Joe Rechsteiner explained to the Associated Press. “And it provides for protection of forest resources.” In 2015, the Center for Biological Diversity in Oakland, Calif. sued the Forest Service to block Nestlé from using the watershed, arguing the conglomerate was operating without a valid permit. A federal judge allowed continued water collection for bottling , while regulators considered a new permit. In its permit renewal application, the company cited 70 environmental studies to support its continued watershed usage. Arrowhead’s use of the Strawberry Creek watershed dates back to 1909, when the Arrowhead Springs Company was formed. Nestlé must accept the agreement within 60 days. In a statement to the AP, Nestlé noted they would “carefully review the specifics of the decision.” Via  Associated Press Images via John Heil (1, 2)

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US Forest Service allows Nestl to continue taking water from California national forest

Five changes agri-businesses need to make if they want to survive

March 24, 2017 by  
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For an industry that relies heavily on natural resources such as clean air, soil and water, becoming more environmentally friendly is not just a marketing ploy — it is a necessity.

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Five changes agri-businesses need to make if they want to survive

Recycling for Profit: 5 Ways to Turn Your Trash into Cash

March 22, 2017 by  
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There are numerous benefits to recycling — reducing the use of natural resources, boosting the economy and saving energy, to name just a few — but sometimes it lacks an immediate personal benefit. If you want to profit from your good deed with more…

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Recycling for Profit: 5 Ways to Turn Your Trash into Cash

See Just How Much Food You — Yes, You — Are Wasting

December 9, 2016 by  
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In 2012, we received some dismal news about food waste. A staggering 40 percent of food is wasted from farm to fork, according to a report by the Natural Resources Defense Council. Suddenly, we were all running to our fridges to make soups from…

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See Just How Much Food You — Yes, You — Are Wasting

Fish with "human-like teeth" spotted in Michigan lakes

August 18, 2016 by  
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The Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) recently reported finding fish with “human-like teeth” in southeastern Michigan lakes. Anglers spotted red-bellied pacu in Lake St. Clair and near Port Huron. While the sight of these unusual fish may be good for a giggle or a gasp, their presence in Michigan lakes points to a deeper issue. These unusual fish sport teeth eerily reminiscent of humans’ so they can eat seeds and nuts. While they’re not native to Michigan, DNR said they’re not invasive. They’re imported from South America, and their presence in Michigan lakes likely means aquarium owners dumped their pet fish into the lakes. Related: This friendly fish has visited a Japanese diver for 25 years The DNR took the opportunity to remind aquarium owners it’s illegal to release their fish without a permit, and that pet release of any kind is rarely the humane option. Aquatic Species and Regulatory Affairs Unit manager Nick Popoff said in a press release, “Pets released from confined, artificial environments are poorly equipped to fend off predators and may be unable to successfully forage for food or find shelter. Those that do succeed in the wild can spread exotic diseases to native animals. In the worst-case scenario, released animals can thrive and reproduce, upsetting natural ecosystems to the degree that these former pets become invasive species .” In the wild, the pacus probably wouldn’t survive frigid Michigan winters, but DNR said climate change could “increase the possibility” of their survival through the winter. The pacus may have been dumped because they outgrew their tanks or started to eat other aquarium fish, said Paige Filice, who works with the Reduce Invasive Pet and PLant Escapes (RIPPLE). She suggested that rather than dumping the fish in lakes, pacu owners could donate their fish to a zoo, aquarium, environmental learning center, or another hobbyist. She said some pet stores might take the fish back if an owner can no longer care for the pacu. + Michigan Department of Natural Resources Images via Michigan Department of Natural Resources , Henrik Carl, Natural History Museum of Denmark, and Wikimedia Commons

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Fish with "human-like teeth" spotted in Michigan lakes

Cowspiracy: “The Film That Environmental Organizations Don’t Want You to See”

September 19, 2014 by  
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Cowspiracy Official Trailer from First Spark Media on Vimeo . Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret is a feature-length environmental documentary following a San Francisco filmmaker as he investigates the most destructive industry facing the planet today: large-scale animal factory farming . As he investigates, he encounters a surprising resistance to discuss the subject amongst the very organizations he expected to find leading the charge against the industry. The film then takes a two-pronged approach: exposing the environmental destruction caused by factory farming and investigating just exactly why the world’s leading environmental organizations seem too afraid to talk about it. Read the rest of Cowspiracy: “The Film That Environmental Organizations Don’t Want You to See” Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: agriculture , carbon emissions , cows , Cowspiracy , Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret , documentary , environmental destruction , factory farming , Film , habitat loss , livestock , meat production , methane emissions , natural resources , vegan , vegetarian , water issues

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Cowspiracy: “The Film That Environmental Organizations Don’t Want You to See”

How Much Produce Should I Buy? 6 Simple Tips

May 8, 2013 by  
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If you struggle to use up fresh produce before it spoils, you’re not the only one. The Natural Resources Defense Council estimates that about two-thirds of household food waste is due to spoilage, and a whopping 39 percent of Americans …

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How Much Produce Should I Buy? 6 Simple Tips

Get Seasonal: Spring Recipes You’ll Love

May 8, 2013 by  
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To celebrate the season, we’re getting creative with the three As of spring: Asparagus, artichokes and arugula. Each of these tasty seasonal veggies has something different to offer in the kitchen, and we can’t wait to explore every one…

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Get Seasonal: Spring Recipes You’ll Love

New Lithium Reserve Discovered in Wyoming Could Meet All US Demand

April 26, 2013 by  
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As the clean tech and electric vehicle industries grow, there is an ever greater demand for lithium – the key ingredient in the lithium-ion batteries used to store energy in EVs, laptop computers and a host of other devices. At present the US imports around 80 percent of its lithium, but the University of Wyoming’s Carbon Management Institute just discovered a massive reserve that could transform the US from a “significant lithium importer to an independent lithium producer.” Read the rest of New Lithium Reserve Discovered in Wyoming Could Meet All US Demand Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “solar energy” , carbon management institute , li batteries , li-ion , lithium , lithium batteries , lithium ion , lithium salt , natural resources , Rock Springs Uplift , unveristy of wyoming , wind energy , wyoming lithium        

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New Lithium Reserve Discovered in Wyoming Could Meet All US Demand

UID Architects’ Nest House is an Eco-Friendly Retreat for Three Women in a Japanese Forest

April 26, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of UID Architects’ Nest House is an Eco-Friendly Retreat for Three Women in a Japanese Forest Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architecture , Botanical , cat , Daylighting , forest , green interiors , Hiroshima , Japanese design , nest house , UID Architects        

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UID Architects’ Nest House is an Eco-Friendly Retreat for Three Women in a Japanese Forest

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