Architect builds a tiny studio in his backyard to be closer to his child

September 28, 2017 by  
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This tiny backyard studio in Toronto is the perfect home office for parents who want to play a bigger role in their young child’s life. Oliver Dang, founder of architecture firm Six Four Five A , has constructed the timber structure for himself as a private workspace overlooking a small green area where his one-year-old can play. The studio occupies a place at the end of the architect’s garden enclosed by high fencing. The cedar wood used for the fence was also chosen for decking and cladding the 100-square-foot hut. An asymmetric pitched roof tops the structure and shelters a small interior space fully optimized to fit all the necessary amenities. Related: Timber Shoffice is a Naturally Daylit Garden Shed + Office Combo in London Exposed vertical studs are used to support shelves, the drawing board occupies a space underneath the window, and a standing computer desk runs along one side. A slab of Carrara marble salvaged from a skyscraper functions as a threshold. The building provides the family with more flexibility in organizing their day-to-day life and spend more time together. The firm said in a statement: “The resulting design is a bright, lofty and functional office space that is also visually and spatially connected to the house and yard.” + Six Four Five A Via Dezeen Photos by Ashlea Wessel

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Architect builds a tiny studio in his backyard to be closer to his child

LEED-seeking illumina i3 campus lets workers work anywhere

August 17, 2017 by  
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San Diego’s new BioMed Realty i3 campus is raising the bar for corporate research parks everywhere. Perkins+Will recently designed the iconic science and research campus that’s on track for LEED Platinum certification and exemplifies the “work anywhere” culture. Filled with natural light and topped with green roofs, this environmentally progressive design features a wide variety of energy saving measures and reduces energy and water use by 30 and 20 percent. Located off Interstate 805, the Biotech Hub is the new home of leading genomics research and life sciences company illumina . The campus comprises three trapezoidal, all-white concrete buildings punctuated with landscaped gathering spaces, as well as a 33,500-square-foot outdoor courtyard at the campus heart that includes a performance stage, bocce ball court, herb garden, fitness area, restaurant, and cafe. Parking is hidden underground. Connectivity and collaboration are major themes of the campus design—i3 is 100 percent wireless—and employees are encouraged to work anywhere on campus they feel most comfortable at any time of the day. “The campus turns the stereotypical concept of a suburban research park right on its head, and makes it infinitely better,” said Ryan Bussard, principal at Perkins+Will. “Instead of a trove of uninviting office buildings surrounding a sea of asphalt parking lots, the i3 campus empowers people to connect, engage, collaborate, innovate, and—perhaps most important—be inspired.” Floor-to-ceiling glass lets in ample natural light and frames views of the surrounding mountains. Collaborative areas, such as the lounges and conference rooms, are connected directly to outdoor terraces . A variety of workspaces can accommodate different work styles and preferences. Related: World’s greenest and healthiest office crowned in Washington, D.C. The i3 campus is on track to earn LEED Platinum certification for the core and shell, while LEED Gold is expected for the interiors. The campus’ on-site fuel cells generate clean energy, while energy usage is minimized thanks to access to natural light, motorized and fixed sunshades, and energy-efficient fixtures. Responsible water management is a big part of the campus design. Recycled water sourced from a local utility irrigates the site and is used for cooling towers. Green roofs planted with heat- and drought-tolerated native plants filter and reduce stormwater runoff in conjunction with the on-site bio-filtration system and permeable pavers. Site-water mitigation tucked beneath the courtyard also helps reduce burden on the city’s local infrastructure. + Perkins+Will

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LEED-seeking illumina i3 campus lets workers work anywhere

Luxurious solar home wraps around a sloped green roof

June 14, 2017 by  
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Architecture and landscape unite in the MeMo House, a solar-powered home in Buenos Aires built to maximize green space. Located between infill buildings, the MeMo House is the work of local studio Bam! Arquitectura , which based the design on sustainable design principles, such as low energy consumption and native plantings. The light-filled home embraces nature with its back garden and sloping green roof that connects all three floors. Located on a dense urban plot in San Isidro, the compact MeMo House was created for a client with a passion for landscaping and the environment. To minimize the loss of green space, the architects created a system of landscaped ramps that zigzag along the building’s three levels to create a continuous and accessible garden terrace. Planted with native flora, the landscaped ramps are visible from the exterior and interior, where they’re enclosed in full-height glazing . Solar panels top the MeMo House and provide renewable energy for heating, ventilation , and air conditioning. Energy consumption is further minimized with effective insulation. Sun studies informed the building’s site placement to maximize solar energy and natural lighting. Related: Breezy Buenos Aires holiday home embraces nature with a wildflower-growing roof Reduction in water consumption is achieved through efficient wastewater technology and the use of harvested rainwater for irrigation. “We conceive the sustainability of the project as a path, not as a goal,” wrote the architects. “Hence, we base our path on the LEED standards and we incorporate the concepts of durability and economy which are fundamental in our architectural works, thus satisfying the needs of the present generation without endangering the possibilities of future generations since the impact on the environment and its inhabitants is significantly reduced.” + Bam! Arquitectura Via ArchDaily Images © Jeremias Thomas

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Luxurious solar home wraps around a sloped green roof

Cramped 19th-century mansion becomes a bright and open modern residence

March 16, 2017 by  
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The renovation of this 19th-century mansion near Paris highlights the historic elements of the original building, while optimizing its spatial organization to fit modern living. 05AM Arquitectura restored the characteristic features of 19th century home while opening the interior of the house toward the rear garden to embrace the outdoors. The owners of the house– a couple with two young children – commissioned 05AM Arquitectura to restore it to its former glory and make its interior compatible with their daily life. Located in Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, a commune in the southeastern suburbs of Paris , Maison à Colombages featured ornate ceilings and wall moldings, a fireplace, alcoves and a layout that divided the interior into relatively small, poorly lit rooms. Related: Beautiful 19th century Tuscan farmhouse renovated with hollow terra-cotta bricks The architects removed some of the existing partitions and connected the main living area with the dining room and kitchen. They improved the functionality of the entry and added built-in furniture with storage areas and wardrobes. This intervention drastically improved natural lighting and established a stronger connection with the garden. + 05AM Arquitectura Via Plataforma Arquitectura Photos by Adrià Goula

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Cramped 19th-century mansion becomes a bright and open modern residence

5 companies leading the charge on net zero building

August 1, 2016 by  
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From building controls to dynamic glass to natural lighting, these names are looking up.

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Massive stone walls rotate to bring natural light inside this extraordinary Indian home

July 6, 2016 by  
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The house, called Moving Landscapes, is located near the city of Ahmedabad in India . It was built for a successful real-estate developer and his family, and designed as a linear pavilion with three equal wings that meander around existing trees in order to preserve them. The central volumes house the main living quarters, while the others accommodate the private spaces. Bedrooms occupy two stories of the wings and are filled with modern Italian furniture, including a Möbius strip -shaped bar made of stainless steel. Related: Australia’s Pittwater House opens and closes with timber shade facade A monolithic 15-foot-tall wall clad in stone opens to reveal the interior of the house, transforming from a continuous volume into an array of panels that rotate around their central axes to reveal the second, glass layer of the envelope. They also provide an abundance of natural light and facilitate natural ventilation. Thanks to a concealed motorized system the house fluctuates from acting as a glass pavilion to becoming a solid volume. + Matharoo Associates Photos by Edmund Sumner , @edmundsumner

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Massive stone walls rotate to bring natural light inside this extraordinary Indian home

Vestas shakes up wind power with a 12-blade turbine tower

July 6, 2016 by  
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It’s expensive to transport wind turbines , which adds to the cost of wind power . Seeking to bring those costs down, Danish wind turbine company Vestas decided to tack on more rotors to get the most out of a turbine tower. They’re currently testing a multi-rotor design at the Technical University of Denmark that has four rotors and 12 blades. The company announced earlier this month on Facebook that their new turbine generated its first kilowatt hour (kWh) of power. The multi-rotor turbine doesn’t have the three blades typical on most wind turbines, but 12. The turbine being tested has a ” tip height ” of 74 meters, or around 242 feet, because the testing site restricts tip height to 75 meters. Vestas is using 1990’s refurbished nacelles (or the covers for ” working parts ” of the wind turbine) to explore the concept. Related: Giant turbine blades could bring exponential growth to U.S. wind power market One potential drawback of the multi-rotor design is that if one component breaks or stops functioning, Vestas would have to make rapid adjustments so the rest of the turbine could offset the flaw. Real-time monitoring would be therefore crucial. CleanTechnica speculates that could be why the company is using refurbished parts rather than creating new parts for the new multi-rotor turbine. In their Facebook post announcing the first kWh, Senior Specialist, Electrical, Load & Control Erik Carl Lehnskov Miranda said they planned to keep testing ” various software functions .” Vestas added, “…by 2020 as much as 10 percent of the world’s electricity consumption will be satisfied by energy from the wind … [and] we have the confidence to say that wind power is an industry on par with coal and gas.” Via CleanTechnica Images courtesy of Vestas Wind Systems A/S

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New LEGO headquarters in Denmark modeled after its famous toy bricks

July 6, 2016 by  
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LEGO Group plans to add a new headquarters in Denmark , and the global hub will be designed by architect C.F. Møller , also from Denmark. The building itself will be home to a collaborative work (and play) space, according to the company’s mission, while the exterior grounds will consist of a park open to the public. With influence taken straight from the famous toy bricks, Møller’s design will include a LEGO People House, a colorful atrium, and architectural features built right on top of recognizable LEGO elements. The new office complex will be located in Billund, Denmark and will serve as a hub for the company’s global headquarters. To create the design, the architect will take cues from LEGO employees who contributed their input en masse, and the resulting office space will represent the two major aims of the toymaker: work and play. The LEGO People House is an informal space, where employees and visitors “can be physically active and socialize, both during and outside working hours,” according to Claus Flyger Pejstrup, Senior Vice President at the LEGO Group, and responsible for the LEGO Group Headquarters in Denmark. Related: First bricks laid for BIG’s LEGO house in Denmark The LEGO Group employs more than 17,000 people around the world, of which more than 4,000 LEGO® employees of 35 nationalities work in Denmark, spanning product development, marketing, manufacturing, engineering, quality and various other functions. The new building will be the company’s main hub in Billund, spanning 52,000 square meters, and will incorporate energy efficiency features as well as numerous green spaces. “We want a distinct office building that clearly conveys the LEGO values, and which truly expresses the creative, innovative culture of our company,” said Pejstrup. “I am very excited that we can now present our vision for this new building, both to our employees and to the community.” + C.F. Møller + LEGO Group Images via C.F. Møller

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New LEGO headquarters in Denmark modeled after its famous toy bricks

Thong House in Vietnam redefines the traditional townhouse

April 14, 2016 by  
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Mecanoo wins competition to design the Tainan Public Library with natural materials

February 24, 2016 by  
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