The Air Opus pop-up camper inflates in 90 seconds flat

February 23, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

The Air Opus Camper makes on-the-road living easy with an amazing self-inflating system that pops up in 90 seconds flat. Simply flick a switch and the camper automatically expands. When it’s time to leave, a quick-release valves deflate the camper in 30 seconds. The entire structure can be folded up and ready to go in under two minutes. The Air Opus Camper uses Air Pole Technology to make set up a snap. To inflate the camper , the two lids on top of the trailer need to be folded outwards. Once completely extended, there are just a few bed supports to snap into place. The final step is engaging the air pump, which inflates the camper in a minute and a half. Related: TAXA unveils ultra-lightweight Mantis camper with pop-up roof The Air Opus camper, which retails at $21,499, offers an exceptionally comfortable interior with plenty sleeping and living space. The design improves upon previous models with more windows and skylights to let in natural light . As an extra bonus, the trailer is outfitted with a nifty pull out kitchen/grill for outdoor bbq-ing around the campfire. + Opus Campers Via Uncrate Images via Opus Campers

See original here:
The Air Opus pop-up camper inflates in 90 seconds flat

Tesla-powered 1981 Honda Accord accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 2.7 seconds

February 23, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Electric car conversions are popping up more and more as tinkerers put Tesla parts into other vehicles. Electrek recently shared an impressive example: the Teslonda, a 1981 Honda Accord converted by Jim Belosic of Reno, Nevada. He equipped the car with a Performance Large Tesla Drive Unit from HSR Motors and a Chevy Volt battery pack. The Teslonda’s body may be nearly 40 years old, but the modified car still accelerated from zero to 60 miles per hour in 2.7 seconds. If you see a 1981 Honda Accord rolling around the streets of Reno, it just might have a Tesla drive unit inside. Belosic, CEO of software company ShortStack who wrenches with cars as a hobby, told Inhabitat, “I’ve kept [the Honda Accord] around but I wasn’t driving it much…so I figured modernizing it with an electric drivetrain would be kinda fun. I haven’t worked with electric vehicle systems before, but I really think that is where the future is headed so I figured I should learn the technology . I’ve always been into modifying and hotrodding cars, so going electric is the next step.” Related: Tesla-powered trolley spotted charging in Minnesota Belosic shared a video of the Teslonda accelerating on YouTube, and said the 2.7 seconds milestone happened with “38 degree asphalt, cold tires, and a cold battery. I’m thinking 2.5 seconds is possible.” Electric Gasser hahaha ? #teslonda #gasser #hondaaccord #teslalife A post shared by Jimmy Built (@jimmy.built) on Feb 15, 2018 at 8:50pm PST Electrek said HSR Motors’ Performance Large Tesla Drive Unit offers a peak power output of 400 kilowatts. Jason Hughes, whom Electrek described as a prominent Tesla hacker, started HSR Motors after purchasing lots of Model X and Model S salvaged vehicles, repairing some and using components of others in projects such as a home energy storage system. He’s now selling Tesla drive units, battery modules, and a custom control system through HSR Motors. Sorry I haven’t posted anything in a while. I’ve been busy with a new project: #teslonda. She’s a cross between a Tesla model S, a 60s #gasser and a 1981 Honda Accord. She’s extremely quick. A post shared by Jimmy Built (@jimmy.built) on Feb 10, 2018 at 7:43pm PST Belosic has also worked on a steam car and posted videos on YouTube. He told Inhabitat, “It’s fun to learn something new, just like the steam car last year. Next year maybe I’ll do something turbine-powered.” He shared more images of the Teslonda and his other projects on Instagram; you can check them out here . + Jimmy Built YouTube + Jimmy Built Instagram Via Electrek Images via Jimmy Built on YouTube

Originally posted here: 
Tesla-powered 1981 Honda Accord accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 2.7 seconds

Yurt-inspired visitor’s center in China blends into its exceptional surroundings

February 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Yurt-inspired visitor’s center in China blends into its exceptional surroundings

This gorgeous visitor center in China was inspired by Mongolian yurts . Architecture firm HDD combined locally sourced stone and wooden beams to create a multi-functional space where local children can play and read. The Mulan Weichang Visitors Center also offers overnight accommodations and a great spot for astronomy enthusiasts to observe the night sky, all nestled within the stunning Mongolian grasslands. The building is located in the northeast of Hebei province, an area connected to inner Mongolia grasslands where ancient Chinese emperors used to hold autumn hunting festivals. Blending into its grassy surroundings, the building resembles the traditional Mongolian yurt. This layout creates a series of round, semi-public spaces that fit perfectly with the modern lifestyle. Related: A Firsthand Look at the Magnolia 2300 Yurt – the First Energy Star Home in British Columbia The middle of the library is a sunken living space, and the kitchen and dining area located off to the side. Large windows fill the interior with natural light and offer views of the landscape. This openness toward the exterior dominates every corner of the interior, including the bathroom, where a freestanding bathtub sits in front of another large window. Related: Trakke Transforms Ancient Yurt into a Packable Round House That Pops Up Anywhere for the Everyday Adventurer The architects used local materials including old stone and used wooden beams in order for the building to blend seamlessly into its natural surroundings. The main structure of the building is steel framing, combined with triple layered low-e glass panels, while the exterior wooden frames double as an efficient shading system. + HDD Architecture Via Contemporist Photos by Shengliang Su

Original post: 
Yurt-inspired visitor’s center in China blends into its exceptional surroundings

Scott Pruitt thinks global warming could be favorable for humans

February 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Scott Pruitt thinks global warming could be favorable for humans

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrator Scott Pruitt has once again aired thoughts that depart from mainstream climate science , according to The Guardian . In a recent interview with Nevada TV station News 3 , Pruitt suggested global warming could be beneficial for people. He said, “Do we really know what the ideal surface temperature should be in the year 2100, in the year 2018? It’s fairly arrogant for us to think we know exactly what it should be in 2100.” Pruitt said in an interview with News 3’s Gerard Ramahlo, “No one disputes the climate changes , is changing, that’s, we see that, that’s constant. We obviously contribute to it; we live in the climate, right?…Now measuring that with precision, Gerard, I think is more challenging than is let on at times but I think the bigger question is…is it an existential threat? Is it something that is unsustainable or what kind of effect or harm is this going to have? I mean, we know that humans have most flourished during times of what, warming trends. I mean, so, so, I think there’s assumptions made that because the climate is warming that that necessarily is a bad thing.” Related: Pruitt met with Dow Chemical CEO before denying pesticide ban The EPA administrator echoed an idea that’s been raised in the past of a debate on climate change, to go over “what we do know and what we don’t know, so the American people can be informed and make decisions on their own.” A snapshot of the EPA website on January 19, 2017, the day before Donald Trump was sworn into office, was very clear that the impacts of climate change would threaten human health . They said people could be exposed to disease , be threatened by extreme weather events, or face food insecurity due to climate change impacts. Via The Guardian and News 3 Images via Gage Skidmore on Flickr and Wikimedia Commons

Continued here: 
Scott Pruitt thinks global warming could be favorable for humans

Beautiful Eichler-inspired home draws the eye with a dramatic roof

February 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Beautiful Eichler-inspired home draws the eye with a dramatic roof

A coastal infill lot in Southern California has been transformed into a beautiful new home that leans heavily on mid-century modern influences. Surfside Projects and architect Lloyd Russell teamed up to design Avocado Acres House in Encinitas, a beach town just outside of San Diego. The Case Study Houses and Eichler Homes provided the main inspiration for the home, which also incorporates sustainable and energy-efficient design elements. Like all beloved mid-century modern homes in California, Avocado Acres Home embraces the outdoors with ample glazing . A sloping curved shed roof tops the single-story building and tie together its three pavilions that make up a U-shaped plan. “Straight lines with an angular street front geometry sits in stark contrast to the unique curvilinear roof profile,” wrote the designers. “A simple color palette of the open interior space complements the muscular concrete walls and extensive use of natural wood tones on the vaulted ceiling, flooring and cabinetry.” Related: Classic Eichler gets a tasteful renovation and expansion in the heart of Silicon Valley The main living spaces are placed at the front of the home near the street and arranged in an L-formation, however, high walls and clerestory windows preserve privacy. In contrast, nine-foot-tall sliding glass doors open the dining room up to the outdoor courtyard hidden from the street. Three bedrooms, including the master ensuite, are located at the rear of the home. The home’s sustainable features were certified by California’s GreenPoint Rated system. + Surfside Projects + Lloyd Russell Photos by Darren Bradley

Read more: 
Beautiful Eichler-inspired home draws the eye with a dramatic roof

Copper-clad Copenhagen landmark boasts Denmarks most energy-efficient laboratories

January 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Copper-clad Copenhagen landmark boasts Denmarks most energy-efficient laboratories

Copenhagen’s recently completed Maersk Tower boasts the nation’s most energy-efficient laboratories, where waste energy is captured and reused. Designed by C.F. Møller Architects , this new city landmark is a pioneer within energy-efficient laboratory construction and boasts a variety of sustainable design elements from an innovative facade with movable climate shields to multiple green roofs. The copper-clad building was created as an extension of Panum, the University of Copenhagen’s Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences. Seven years in the making, the 42,700-square-meter Maersk Tower sports a triangular and organic form clad in glass and copper-covered shutters that reference the city’s many copper church steeples. The vertical massing also leaves space for a new publicly accessible campus park with a zigzagging ‘floating path’ providing pedestrian and cyclist access to different parts of campus. Laboratories make up over half of the building, which also houses offices, shared facilities, an 18,000-square-meter foyer, canteen, auditoriums, and classrooms. “To create architecture for world-class health research, it is important to design a venue with many opportunities to meet—both across different professional groups and across the public domain and the research community,” wrote the architects. “This will help to disseminate the research activities, leading to knowledge sharing and inspiration for new and groundbreaking research.” To that end, all the shared facilities are grouped together in the low base on which Maersk Tower sits. An open atrium with a continuous spiral staircase joins 15 floors and promotes views of the outdoors and visual connectivity indoors. Every floor features an open “Science Plaza” that serves as natural gathering spaces. Related: Solar-powered school will teach children how to grow and cook their own food Natural light and ventilation are optimized throughout the building and views of greenery can be enjoyed from every floor. Copper shutters that adjust as needed provide protection from solar heat gain. Lush green roofs that top the tower and the low base help combat the urban heat island effect . + C.F. Møller Architects Images by Adam Moerk

See the rest here: 
Copper-clad Copenhagen landmark boasts Denmarks most energy-efficient laboratories

A run-down property in Portugal gets a playful renovation using a blend of colors and patterns

January 17, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A run-down property in Portugal gets a playful renovation using a blend of colors and patterns

The inventive  renovation of this house in Ovar, Portugal, balances the past and the present by connecting the main residence with a newer addition using playful patterns and colors. Architect Nelson Resende Arquitecto  turned the crumbling, traditional home into a modern multi-use space with plenty of charm by drawing in light, adding modern finishes and highlighting the original features of the home. The house is located in the city of Ovar in Portugal, on a lot bordering the access road, abutting against the adjacent buildings. The secondary structure and the main house itself are treated distinctly, with the main residence featuring larger rooms. The spaces in the secondary structure are more constrained. Related: Architects convert 150-year-old Lisbon building into an artisanal green studio The architect decided that the main building should house the living areas and common spaces, with the street-facing part of the secondary structure converted into a garage and the inward-facing section reserved for private use, service and storage spaces . The attic in the main building is a multipurpose space bathed in natural light . The architect used beautiful decorative tiles for the facades and wood in the interior, blending traditional design with modern functions. + Nelson Resende Arquitecto Photos by João Morgado

View post:
A run-down property in Portugal gets a playful renovation using a blend of colors and patterns

The majority of the National Park Service board just resigned

January 17, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The majority of the National Park Service board just resigned

The majority of the 12-person National Park System Advisory Board (NPSAB) resigned this week because President Donald Trump’s Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke was unwilling to meet with them, according to NPR . Democrat Tony Knowles, former governor of Alaska, said in a resignation letter “…from all of the events of this past year I have a profound concern that the mission of stewardship, protection, and advancement of our National Parks has been set aside.” The National Park Service (NPS) advisory board was first authorized in 1935, and today more than three-quarters of its members have left their seats. In the January 15 letter Knowles said that he will remain dedicated to the success of America’s national parks, but “For the last year we have stood by waiting for the chance to meet and continue the partnership between the NPSAB and the DOI [Department of the Interior] as prescribed by law. We understand the complexity of transition but our requests to engage have been ignored and the matters on which we wanted to brief the new Department team are clearly not part of its agenda.” Related: Ryan Zinke recommends shrinking two more national monuments Nine board members signed that letter, and all of their terms were set to expire in May. Today a tenth member – whose term doesn’t expire until 2021 – resigned as well. Project Concern International CEO Carolyn Hessler Radelet submitted a similar letter to Zinke. According to The Washington Post , this move means the federal government lacks a functioning body to “designate national historic or natural landmarks.” The publication said it also shows how federal advisory bodies have been marginalized in Trump’s administration . Zinke suspended outside committees back in May of last year for his staff to review their work. Interior spokesperson Heather Swift said boards restarted in an email to The Washington Post earlier this month, but didn’t provide other details. The two people remaining on the board at this time are University of Maryland professor Rita Colwell and Harvard University professor Linda Blimes, who told The Washington Post she didn’t resign as she’s currently conducting research funded by the National Park Foundation and wants to finish. Their terms are up in May. Via NPR and The Washington Post (1 , 2 , 3) Images by Casey Horner on Unsplash , Gage Skidmore on Flickr and NPS

See the original post here: 
The majority of the National Park Service board just resigned

Green-roofed office is the first large-scale CLT structure in southeast Europe

January 12, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Green-roofed office is the first large-scale CLT structure in southeast Europe

Instead of concrete or metal, this striking eco-friendly office building in Romania features a sturdy timber skeleton in what’s claimed as the first large-scale CLT structure in southeast Europe. Romanian firm Tecto Arhitectura designed the building as the new office for HSR factory in Reci, Covasna. Designed for long-term sustainability, the office building draws on geothermal energy, uses energy-efficient technologies, and is topped by an extensive green roof. Shaped like a cross in aerial view, the HSR timber office stretches horizontally from northeast to southwest and is intersected by a two-story volume with a northwest-southeast orientation. A stairway and a double-height atrium are located at the heart of the office that accommodates around 60 people. Built to minimize thermal loss, the office is built mainly of industrially prefabricated cross-laminated timber panels and gluelam elements. Given Romania’s freezing winters, the architects inserted passive house-standard mineral wool insulation into the walls, slabs, and flat roofs and optimized solar gain in winter. Natural cross ventilation and daylighting is optimized and pass through operable triple-glazed windows and doors. Related: Nation’s first large-scale mass timber residence hall breaks ground in Arkansas Colorful aluminum cladding wraps around the building’s airtight envelope and thick CLT walls. The facade colors are echoed in the interior, as is a celebration of timber that is featured throughout. Natural lighting is optimized and complimented by LEDs. A biomass cogeneration plant provides heating and electricity for the radiant heating and cooling system, as do geothermal heat pumps and a heat recovery ventilation system. An extensive green roof covers the building. + Tecto Arhitectura Via ArchDaily Images via Tecto Arhitectura , by Cosmin Dragomir

Here is the original post: 
Green-roofed office is the first large-scale CLT structure in southeast Europe

Gorgeous lakeside home takes cues from Pacific Northwest midcentury modernism

January 2, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Gorgeous lakeside home takes cues from Pacific Northwest midcentury modernism

The tradition of midcentury modernism in the Pacific Northwest lives on in the handsome West Mercer Residence nestled along the shores of Lake Washington. SKL Architects designed this cedar-clad abode and worked closely with local craftspeople to create the custom 5,500-square-foot home with enviable views framed through large expanses of glass. California may be considered the stronghold of midcentury modernism in the West, but the design movement also crept up to the Pacific Northwest led by the likes of architects William Fletcher and Paul Kirk. Taking cues from the neighborhood, the West Mercer Residence continues the “tradition of mid-century Pacific Northwest modernism.” The three-story home is wrapped in native cedar that contrasts beautifully with black steel, rock, and cement. Full-height windows blur the line between the indoors and outdoors, as does the series of steps that lead down the grassy slope towards the lakeshore. SKL Architects was tasked to design a home that would replace a small, cluttered one with a more spacious abode accommodating a busy family with young children. “The house can be imagined as two bars of space, one public and one private, which are connected by a central double height volume,” wrote the architects. “The design emphasizes the seamless connection between internal and external spaces. The house is oriented towards the lake, so that water and light are present throughout the house. Floor and wall materials are continuous from indoors to outside, blurring the delineation of the two spaces.” Related: Gorgeous copper-clad home celebrates craft in the Pacific Northwest The large communal areas are mostly placed on the main level, while the comparatively smaller bedrooms are located above on the upper floor and the secondary rooms tucked below on the lower level. Local craftsmanship is visible throughout the home from the bronze and leather front door to a custom steel chandelier that can be raised and lowered. + SKL Architects Images by Tim Bies

Continued here:
Gorgeous lakeside home takes cues from Pacific Northwest midcentury modernism

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1516 access attempts in the last 7 days.