Village-inspired office in Jakarta is topped with living trees and a green roof

August 21, 2017 by  
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The new Aedas- designed Unilever HQ in Jakarta references Indonesia ‘s villages to create a welcoming environment filled with natural sunlight and plenty of green space. The building features green roofing, a main square and winding streets to mimic the organization of a traditional village, along with floor-to-ceiling louvered windows that fill the interior with light. The new building sits in the BSD Green Office Park, Indonesia’s first green office campus masterplanned by Aedas. It houses the company’s four separate offices in Jakarta under one roof and combines its modern vision with the country’s historic architectural influences. Related: Aedas unveils mountainous mixed-use building that looks like a stack of books The large complex incorporates three main elements–community, diversity and nature–into the design and focused on facilitating collaboration while maintaining privacy. Group and individual workspaces are organized into zones to encourage collaboration. The ground floor houses public and common areas organized around a central atrium. A variety of elements– Indonesian batik fabrics, recycled teak timber , and furniture– reference the traditional Indonesian culture. Grey aluminium blade louvers cover the curtain wall system and provides shade while reducing heat gain . Natural light reaches all interior spaces thanks to the absence of enclosures. + Aedas Via World Architecture News

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Village-inspired office in Jakarta is topped with living trees and a green roof

Breathable skin to wrap around stunning light-filled Book City in Shenzhen

August 15, 2017 by  
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Arts and culture aren’t thought of as Shenzhen’s strong suits, but the manufacturing megacity is making quick work to change its image. As part of the Chinese city’s movement to embrace creative and cultural industries, local architecture firm Atelier Global was announced the winner of a design competition for the Shenzhen Book City, a mixed-use development in the heart of the Long Hua arts district. The winning design features a massive modern complex punctuated with greenery and wrapped in a breathable skin that lets in natural light and ventilation. Atelier Global designed the 45,000-square-meter Book City as an open and flexible public space befitting its future role as the new cultural anchor in the Longhua district. The six-story building’s site-specific massing responds to the surrounding urban fabric to optimize views and accessibility. Inside, Book City includes a library, retail, restaurants, and co-working spaces , as well as flexible cultural spaces on four sides of the building that connect to a large flexible public space in the atrium heart of the building. Landscaped terraces, visible from street level, bring nature indoors, while sports facilities are located atop the roof. Related: Cascading Shenzhen office building luxuriates under a stepped green roof “The urban cultural-living room promotes connectivity not only inside the building, also with the city,” wrote the architects. “The perimeter of the building embraces people and nature from different corners of the city. The idea of cultural street along the site perimeter grows into the building and escalates vertically through terraces and atrium . This vertical form of cultural space brings an unprecedented experience to the readers.” A breathable skin with vertical louvers mitigates solar heat gain while allowing light and views into the building. Book City’s target competition date is in 2020. + Atelier Global Via ArchDaily Images via Atelier Global

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Breathable skin to wrap around stunning light-filled Book City in Shenzhen

This flower-clad home that spreads contagious happiness goes on sale in L.A.

July 25, 2017 by  
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A unique new home said to spread “contagious happiness” has hit the Los Angeles market—and it’s checking all the major boxes for walkability, amenities, and even sustainability. Architect and artist Cameron McNall originally designed the home, known as 4016 Tivoli, for his family, drawing inspiration from his dual careers and the California spirit of the 1960s. Wrapped in giant metallic flower cutouts, the quirky artistic home is also built to the City of Los Angeles’ “Green Building” standards. L.A. is notorious for its traffic and car-dominated landscapes, but 4016 Tivoli promises homeowners the freedom to walk and bike to nearly every imaginable amenity, from grocery stores to salons. Located on the east side of Venice in the west-Washington area known as “Silicon Beach,” the 2,700-square-foot house includes four bedrooms, a flex room, four-and-a-half baths, as well as an attached 375-square-foot studio garage that could be legally converted into an accessory dwelling unit. An 800-square-foot landscaped roof deck crowns the home and offers beautiful views that don’t compromise privacy. The beautiful rooftop includes built-in seating, hardwood decking, a gas fire pit, dining area, and a gas-heated hot tub. To create privacy and allow natural light to filter through, the architect wrapped the home with a decorative 110-foot-tall facade of computer-cut metallic flowers. The interior’s tall ceilings and white walls help create a bright, airy, and spacious living environment with framed views of the outdoors. The building’s energy-saving features include one-inch thick double-pane thermal low-E windows and doors, two high-efficiency heating/cooling units, low-flow toilets, LEDs, rain barrels, permeable pavers, 100-amp Tesla quick-charging capability, eco-compliant insulation, and remotely controlled smart home tech such as the Nest smoke detectors and Ecobee thermostats. The home is also outfitted with low VOC paints, FSC-certified wood, and other high-quality materials. Related: Gorgeous Japanese-inspired reading nook breathes new life into a Frank Gehry-designed home “I designed 4016 Tivoli for my family as a total design living experience that represents my relationship to art, architecture and design,” wrote the architect. “Although I was just a child when I lived in California in the sixties, I was very influenced by the energy and graphics of that period, everything from Warhol to the Mexico ’68 Olympics to Fillmore West concert flyers. When people walk by the house or visit inside, I am pleased that it elicits a smile and a contagious happiness.” The architect carefully curated and/or designed all the home’s furnishings, artwork, and objects to create a cohesive work of art. All of these objects and furnishings seen in the photos are included in the sale of the home. Price is not disclosed, however, 4016 Tivoli is offering tours and considering purchasing offers from qualified buyers. + 4016 Tivoli

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This flower-clad home that spreads contagious happiness goes on sale in L.A.

Centuries-old apartment in Israel transformed into a remarkable modern "cave"

July 24, 2017 by  
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This ancient apartment in Israel was skillfully renovated to unify its cavernous, centuries-old rooms into a modern residence that offers stunning views of the sea. Pitsou Kedem Architects concealed some parts of the traditional arches while uncovering others to create an elegant combination of the old and the new. The rooms of the apartment, located in Tel Aviv-Yafo – an ancient port city in Israel– have been altered over hundreds of years, giving each room its own unique character. The architects approached the refurbishment of the entire space as an opportunity to bring more natural light into the interior and open it up toward the sea. Related: Decrepit cave transformed into a beautiful modern home in China The integrated interior spaces are sheltered underneath beautiful arches . Some of the decorations added over the years have been covered in plaster, while the dome in the kitchen was uncovered. The team introduced a new raw concrete floor with accentuated filing stones to the floor level. Black sheet covering emphasize the openings connecting the rooms. These dark elements also hide new technical systems in the walls. + Pitsou Kedem Architects Via Archdaily Photos by Amit Geron

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Centuries-old apartment in Israel transformed into a remarkable modern "cave"

Energy-efficient Bluebonnet Studios offers sustainable housing to Austins most vulnerable citizens

July 14, 2017 by  
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The Bluebonnet Studios social housing development in Austin supports a healthy lifestyle through the design. The property, designed by Forge Craft Architecture + Design , provides housing for the homeless, low-income veterans and local musicians. It features forward-thinking sustainable elements such as recycled and locally-sourced materials, a well insulated envelope, optimal orientation, low-flow fixtures and occupancy sensors. The architects worked with a difficult site and a very tight budget, which required a close collaboration between the design, construction, and ownership teams, as well as help of sustainability experts like Pliny Fisk and Jason McLennan . An important aspect of the design was access to natural light , which the team provided by creating a light well that runs through the center of the building. This emphasis on daylight also allows for most of the building to be functional without artificial light in the event of a power outage – including all circulation. Heating and cooling are provided by centralized LG VRF units tied to individual apartment thermostats. Each thermostat is coupled to both window sensors and door-triggered occupancy sensors . All the interior finishes and products were regionally sourced, recycled and healthy. On top of the building, a green space allows for outdoor activities. Related: Top 6 Green Supportive and Low-Income Housing Projects Of the 107 single-occupancy units, 22 are reserved for the area’s homeless and low-income veterans, while five are dedicated to local musicians. Each resident received a small package of tools, including a recycling bin, recycling magnet, green cleaning recipes, and recommendations for conservative thermostat settings to help residents keep their homes green. Additionally, a green housekeeping program provides a dispensing station with Green Seal certified cleaning chemicals for maintenance staff and janitorial contractors. + Forge Craft Architecture + Design Photos by Paul Bardagjy

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Energy-efficient Bluebonnet Studios offers sustainable housing to Austins most vulnerable citizens

Beautiful co-working space takes over a former industrial factory in Mexico City

July 12, 2017 by  
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An old factory in Mexico City has been gutted and repurposed into a modern co-working space with an industrial chic edge. Mexican architects Estudio Atemporal designed the adaptive reuse project, which takes advantage of the existing sawtooth roof and tall ceilings to create airy, light-filled spaces. Bright pops of color, timber surfaces, and an abundance of greenery go a long way in softening the heavy appearance of concrete columns and cinderblocks. Located in the Anáhuac neighbourhood, the co-working space, called Guateque , spans an entire city block with a 722-square-meter footprint. The building comprises two joined volumes: a two-story volume with a sawtooth roof and a three-story volume with a flat roof. The former comprises a greater diversity of co-working spaces , while the latter houses parking, communal kitchen and dining, and an open workshop-style space. Related: Tom Dixon transforms a 17th-century London church into a chic co-working space Natural light floods the building through clerestory windows. The architects installed glazed divider walls to delineate spaces within the building without obstructing the light. A mezzanine level was installed to create intimate work areas with low ceilings. Ping-pong tables with yellow boards also punctuate the co-working area. + Estudio Atemporal Via Dezeen

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Beautiful co-working space takes over a former industrial factory in Mexico City

Minimalist wine-tasting pavilions sustainably embrace Napa Valley

July 7, 2017 by  
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There are few places better to enjoy fantastic wines and views than Napa Valley , and Walker Warner Architects has elevated that experience with a series of elegant wine tasting pavilions. Crafted with environmental sustainability in mind, the pavilions were built for Quintessa Estate Winery, a Napa Valley estate also designed by Walker Warner Architects in 2003. The minimalist structures harmonize with nature with locally sourced and reclaimed materials, as well as prefabricated construction to minimize site impact. Winner of a recent American Institute of Architects San Francisco (AIA SF) Citation Award , the Quintessa Pavilions is commended for exemplifying “the ideal fusion of architecture and nature” on the ridgeline of a beautiful 280-acre winery estate. Carefully placed amongst existing oak trees and surrounded by drought-resistant native grasses , each 250-square-foot pavilion was crafted to provide an immersive, privately hosted wine-tasting experience. The pavilions’ industrial materials palette references the winery’s architecture and will age elegantly over time. Related: The Bardessono is Napa Valley’s Newest Eco Resort and Spa The architects carefully sited each pavilion to shade visitors beneath tree canopies, optimize views, and protect existing mature oaks. Visitors access the pavilion through a doorway carved into a concrete wall, built of fly ash, that runs along the ridgeline. Once inside the prefabricated steel structure, the visitors enjoy plenty of natural light, cross winds, and panoramic views through full-height glazed operable doors. Custom furnishings are built of FSC-certified Afromosia. Reclaimed Sinker cypress was used for casework and ceilings, while locally prefabricated concrete pavers cover the terrace surface and Napa syar stone retaining walls hold back earth. + Walker Warner Architects Photo credit: © Matthew Millman

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Minimalist wine-tasting pavilions sustainably embrace Napa Valley

Tiny Wirmboden chapel in Austria is made of stone sourced on-site

July 6, 2017 by  
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Nestled in an alpine valley in Western Austria, this tiny chapel is a serene haven for local farmers. After an avalanche destroyed the town’s original chapel, including several other huts in 2012, the community decided to rebuild, so they commissioned Innauer-Matt Architects to design a space for gatherings and celebrations using locally-sourced materials.   The Wirmboden chapel is located in at the foot of the steep north face of the valley’s Kanisfluh mountain in Austria . Local farmers organized the initiative to rebuild the original structure, destroyed by an avalanche in 2012. Built over the course of three years, the chapel complements the surrounding alpine architecture and offers a space where people can gather, celebrate and pray. Related: Modern chapel makes a powerful but minimalist statement in the Austrian countryside Locally sourced stone make up the walls of the building, with rough split shingles covering the steep truss. A roof opening brings natural light into the interior. Memorial photo cards were placed in the space between rafters to commemorate loved ones. The entrance, truss and bell space were made from German spruce conventionally used for making violins and guitars. + Innauer-Matt Architects Via Archdaily Photos by Adolf Bereuter

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Tiny Wirmboden chapel in Austria is made of stone sourced on-site

Hollands first Vertical Forest to rise with 10,000 air-purifying plants

July 6, 2017 by  
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Hot on the heels of the world’s first Forest City in China , Stefano Boeri Architetti has announced their winning bid for the first Vertical Forest in the Netherlands. Set to rise in Utrecht, the Hawthorn Tower will, like its Milanese predecessor , be blanketed in greenery and is expected to absorb over 5.4 tons of carbon dioxide. The equivalent of one hectare of woods will be installed on the tower to create a real urban ecosystem with over 30 different vegetal species. Slated to begin construction in 2019, the Hawthorn Tower will infuse greenery into the heart of Jaarbeursboulevard area close to Utrecht Station. The tower is one of two tall buildings in the development, the other designed by Amsterdam-based MVSA studio. “The 90 meters in height tower designed by Stefano Boeri Architetti attempts to create, in Utrecht city center, an innovative experience of cohabitation between city and nature,” said the architects. Around 10,000 plants of different species—360 trees, 9,640 shrubs and flower—will be installed on all sides of the facade. The mixed-use building is positioned as the “new healthy center of Utrecht” and will comprise offices, fitness and yoga areas, bike parking, and public leisure space. Its scale and design will thoughtfully react and complement the surrounding urban fabric. The tower will also host the Vertical Forest Hub, a research center on worldwide urban forestation that’s open to the public on the ground floor and directly connected to the sixth-floor roof garden. The research center will showcase the different technical and botanic solutions chosen for the tower and track the progress of Vertical Forests under construction around the world. Related: China breaks ground on first “Forest City” that fights air pollution The Hawthorn Tower is the latest Vertical Forest of its kind to be unveiled, this time in the heart of Europe, and follows in the steps of other urban forestation projects designed by Stefano Boeri Architetti. Other projects include soon-to-be-completed Vertical Forests in Nanjing and Lausanne, a greenery-covered Mountain Hotel in Guizhou , and other green buildings planned in Paris, Tirana, and Shanghai. Construction on Hawthorn Tower is expected to finish in 2022. + Stefano Boeri Architetti Images by Imaginary A2 / Stefano Boeri Architetti

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Hollands first Vertical Forest to rise with 10,000 air-purifying plants

Airbnb’s brand new Paris office is a loft-like space that feels like home

July 5, 2017 by  
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In line with Airbnb ‘s “Belong Anywhere” adage, the firm’s new office space in Paris is an airy loft-like workspace that fosters creativity and communal working. Airbnb’s Environments Team collaborated with design firm STUDIOS Architecture to create a space that boosts collaboration and feels like home. The new office, designed for 60 employees, utilizes the traditional mansard roof and atypical corners of the building to establish a variety of spaces which include a foyer, salon, library, kitchen, sit-stand desks, private phone booths and a hospitality lounge. As if this weren’t enough of a reason to quit your job and join Airbnb, the office offers its guests and staff incredible views of the Eiffel Tower and Opera Garnier. Related: 8 inspiring tiny Airbnb homes for a taste of living small A vegetation-filled solarium acts as a transitional area between the main entrance and the rest of the office. To help elevate the low ceilings and bring more natural light into the space, the architects introduced cover lighting throughout the office. The meeting rooms reference Airbnb’s listings around the world like those in China, Tasmania, Morocco, USA and UK. A moss wall is a replica of a listing in Moganshan, China, while vintage door panels sourced from an old barn in Normandy mirror a listing in West Hobart, Tasmania. All these features are filtered through the distinct nonchalance of Paris, its restaurants, hotels, flea markets and bistros. + STUDIOS Architecture + Airbnb Environments Photos by Donal Murphy

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Airbnb’s brand new Paris office is a loft-like space that feels like home

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