Luxury private-island resort in the Maldives aims for minimal site impact

November 2, 2017 by  
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A new paradise destination has surfaced on the waters of the jaw-droppingly beautiful Maldives . Singapore-based WOW Architects recently completed the St. Regis Maldives, a luxury hotel that extends out of a private island. In hopes of minimizing the resort’s impact on the landscape, WOW architects implemented prefabricated timber systems and uses local labor and materials whenever possible. Covering 16,000 square meters across land and water, the St. Regis Maldives comprises 77 villas divided into four experiential zones—lagoon, beach, coastal, and jungle—each defined by different anchoring activities connected via a meandering art trail. The hut-like building forms and spaces take inspiration from nature, with maximum use of cross-laminated wood and minimal use of concrete and steel. Landscaping focuses on conservation of existing island flora and fauna, as well as replacement of displaced plant material with native species. Related: World’s largest underwater restaurant installed in the Maldives “The local people live in a delicate balancing act with nature, and are totally dependent on trade, technology, and tourism to sustain themselves,” wrote the architects. “Thus, when we were given an opportunity to design a Maldivian resort hotel, we chose to delight the senses through education, creating awareness, and new paradigms of interacting with the physical environment. Here, paradise is emotionally and intellectually experienced and enjoyed, but with a profound awareness of the complex relationships of the eco systems being inhabited.” + WOW Architects Images 2018 copyright WOW Architects | Warner Wong Design

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Luxury private-island resort in the Maldives aims for minimal site impact

Tropical park with native species will add much-needed green space to Hong Kong

January 30, 2017 by  
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The concrete jungle of Hong Kong will soon become a bit greener. Landscape architecture firm Gustafson Porter + Bowman revealed landscape designs for Taikoo Place to create a new public space that will inject much-needed green space to the dense urban environment. The 69,000-square-foot project will promote biodiversity and public awareness of Hong Kong’s local landscapes with the planting of 53 native trees grown specifically for the park. Taikoo Place’s landscape design will offer a sequence of active and passive spaces, from open areas suitable for jazz concerts and markets to more intimate meeting areas. The park spaces will be tied together by large bands of brown and white granite that run through the site, surrounding streetscape, and lobby of one of the development’s planned towers. Taikoo Square, the largest space in the design, comprises water features designed using 3D modeling to introduce dynamic movement and sounds that reference the former Quays that had existed on the site. Densely planted tropical plants and over 70 trees that provide shade and a cooling microclimate will be neatly framed by sculpted stonework. “To promote biodiversity and raise public awareness of Hong Kong’s heritage of Fung Shui woodlands, 53 of the trees are native species , grown specifically for the project,” writes the firm. “Fung Shui woodlands are remnants of native woodlands which are protected from agricultural clearances due to their spiritual significance. At Taikoo Place, these remnant species have found a new home and bring additional natural elements to an otherwise dense urban space.” Related: Glowing bamboo pavilion promotes ecological design in Hong Kong The lush public park is designed as part of the HK$15 billion redevelopment for Taikoo Place spearheaded by Swire Properties. The development’s planned pair of Grade-A office towers, designed by Wong Ouyang, will target LEED Platinum ratings. The towers will be connected by a new elevated walkway designed by Hugh Dutton Associés. The project is slated for completion in 2021. + Gustafson Porter + Bowman Via ArchDaily Images via Gustafson Porter + Bowman

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Tropical park with native species will add much-needed green space to Hong Kong

Over 200 tons of poisonous herbicides are dumped on North Americas wild lands every year

July 11, 2016 by  
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New data has emerged on how widespread the use of herbicides , including glyphosate , has become in North American federal and tribal land. In 2010 alone, 200 tons of the stuff was sprayed on natural wild lands to help curb the growth of invasive plant species. It is possible this “just trying to help” move may have done more damage to the native plants than the intrusive species would have done. University of Montana researchers published their findings recently, having gathered data with the help of figures from Algoma University and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources . They found that those 200 tons of herbicide were sprayed over 1.2 million acres of U.S. wildlands. Viktoria Wagner from UM explained, “Imagine: The wildland area sprayed by herbicides in that year is comparable to 930,630 football fields, and the amount of herbicides used equals the weight of 13 school buses.” Related: Shocking new map shows where cancer-causing glyphosate sprayed in San Francisco Researchers suspect the numbers are actually higher, seeing as data were not able to be collected from the U.S. Forest Service lands. An unexpected finding from their research was the alarmingly high use of glyphosate, a notorious cancer-causing chemical. Wagner stated, “This finding was unexpected because glyphosate is a nonselective herbicide that harms grasses and herbs alike and thus has a higher potential to negatively affect desired native plants.” The low cost and few restrictions on usage may have played a part in its widespread use, however. The study calls for further analysis and monitoring of how helpful herbicides are in the fight against invasive plants in natural wild lands. Via Phys.org Images via U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service ,  Wikipedia

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Over 200 tons of poisonous herbicides are dumped on North Americas wild lands every year

The NativeScapeGR Project Encourages Green Roofing with Native Species

October 16, 2014 by  
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Developed at the University of Lisbon , Portugal,  The NativeScapeGR project focuses on uses native plant species and biocrusts to create green roofs with low water requirements, adapted to Mediterranean-type climates. Although green roofs have countless environmental benefits, they’re rare in most Mediterranean areas, mainly because of installation and maintenance costs, including irrigation. Green roofs that use native plants would maximize water use and sustainability in that region, while also enhancing biodiversity. Biocrusts are consortia of cyanobacteria, fungi , and lichens that can grow in extreme low water conditions. Since they can shut down their metabolism during dry spells, they can survive for months or even years with low water intake, while still providing the homes beneath them with the benefits of a living roof . You can learn more about this experimental work on the  University of Lisbon in Instituto Superior de Agronomia website , or via their Facebook page . + The NativeScape GR Project The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: grasses , green roof , green roof plants , green roofing , green roofs , living roof , living roofs , mediterranean , Mediterranean climate , NativeScapeGR , plants for green roofs , succulents , The NativeScapeGR Project

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The NativeScapeGR Project Encourages Green Roofing with Native Species

George Bradley’s Art-Filled Buena Vista House is Wrapped in Reclaimed Redwood

October 16, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of George Bradley’s Art-Filled Buena Vista House is Wrapped in Reclaimed Redwood Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , AIA SF , arch + city festival , architecture and the city festival , Buena Vista House , castro district , Eddie Baba , George Bradley , George Bradley Architecture + Design , green architecture , Green Building , green home , reclaimed wood , San Francisco , Sustainable Building

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George Bradley’s Art-Filled Buena Vista House is Wrapped in Reclaimed Redwood

Your State’s Official Flower May Actually be an Alien

September 9, 2011 by  
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Photo: ? nicolas_gent ? / cc Our love-affair with flowers stretches back as far as recorded history, so it’s no wonder that we esteem them so highly. In fact, we have so much affection for the budding blossoms around us that every state in America has added legislation to the books designating an official flower — to serve as a living symbol of the natural beauty each of those 50 states possess. But despite the emblematic power these flower have in stirring regional pride, surprisingly some state flowers aren’t native species at all — and some even o… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Your State’s Official Flower May Actually be an Alien

McMansions Endanger Native Species and Hollywood Icon

February 18, 2010 by  
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Alice Cooper paid about $28,000 to replace an O in the Hollywood sign back in 1978 when it was restored after years of deterioration. Since then, the famed sign has become legendary. Now Mad Men’ s John Slattery, Old Christine ‘s Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Virginia Madsen, Tippi Hedren, and Aisha Tyler are trying to save the landmark from encroachment by a nearby development of gigantic estates

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McMansions Endanger Native Species and Hollywood Icon

Mapping Shipping Routes May Help Combat Invasive Species

January 14, 2010 by  
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Photo via runhmc Invasive species hitching rides on cargo ships has been an issue for decades, but it’s been getting increasing attention as species like zebra mussels take over rivers and lakes and nudge out native species. So far, no one can decide what regulations should be in place so… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Mapping Shipping Routes May Help Combat Invasive Species

Wood-Devouring Clams Infest 100 Sunken Ships in Baltic Sea, Continue to Spread

January 14, 2010 by  
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Photo via Science Daily ‘Dreaded’ Shipworm Can Devour a Shipwreck in 10 Years The shipworm, which isn’t a worm at all, is a maritime archaeologist’s worst enemy. The unusual saltwater clam is known for boring into underwater wooden structures–eventually destroying them entirely. The shipworm can destroy an entire historical archeological site like a sunken ship in just ten years

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Wood-Devouring Clams Infest 100 Sunken Ships in Baltic Sea, Continue to Spread

Climate & Energy Quick Takes: US Wants Diminished UN Climate Roll, Madagascar Sanctions Illegal Logging, Hindu Epic Recitation Helps Plant Trees

January 14, 2010 by  
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photo: Julian Rotela via flickr. Lots of newsworthy stuff coming through in that last 48 hours, so here’s a quick recap: US Says Diminished UN Climate Roll Would Help The Guardian and others have reported that US climate negotiator John Pershing has said that the UN should relinquish its central role for future climate change negotiations.

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Climate & Energy Quick Takes: US Wants Diminished UN Climate Roll, Madagascar Sanctions Illegal Logging, Hindu Epic Recitation Helps Plant Trees

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