Three border collies tear through a charred Chilean forest with backpacks full of seeds

February 15, 2018 by  
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Over 1.4 million acres were burned in Chile in 2017, in the country’s worst wildfire season in history. According to Mother Nature Network , the fire left in its wake a ravaged landscape, but a furry team led by Francisca Torres, a dog trainer who also runs the dog -oriented community, Pewos , came to the rescue. She outfitted three border collies with backpacks filled with seeds , and sent then dashing through the forest. Das, Olivia, and Summer will melt your heart. As they careen through the forest sporting seed-filled backpacks, seeds trickle out; the humans behind the mission hope the spilled seeds will sprout and grow, reviving the forest. For the animals , it’s just a chance to frolic and have fun, according to Torres, their owner. Related: Frida the rescue dog helps search for survivors after Mexico’s deadly earthquake (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = ‘https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.12’; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’)); Feliz dia madre tierra ?? Posted by Pewos on Sunday, May 14, 2017 Das is the oldest at six, and she leads the way with her pups, Summer and Olivia, both two-years-old. The dogs earn treats as they wait for their backpacks to be filled with more seeds, when they come back to their handlers, and at the end of the day’s work. They can cover up to 18 miles, spreading over 20 pounds of future plants, according to Mother Nature Network. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = ‘https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.12’; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’)); Posted by Pewos on Thursday, April 20, 2017 Torres launched the effort in March 2017, and went back to the forest regularly over six months. Her sister, Constanza Torres, also helped; the two women pay for the native seeds , backpacks, and trips to the forest and plan to start the project up again soon. Torres told Mother Nature Network, “We have seen many results in flora and fauna coming back to the burned forest!” (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = ‘https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.12’; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’)); Posted by Pewos on  Friday, March 31, 2017 (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = ‘https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.12’; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’)); Posted by Pewos on  Friday, March 31, 2017 Francisca Torres told Mother Nature Network they specifically use border collies because they are super smart. When they’re not reviving forests, the dogs work with sheep and in disc and obedience training. Via Mother Nature Network Images via Depositphotos

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Three border collies tear through a charred Chilean forest with backpacks full of seeds

Student ditches cramped dorm to live large in a self-built tiny house

February 15, 2018 by  
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Although tiny home living may not be for everyone, there is one group who is certainly taking advantage of the minimal living trend – college students. Instead of paying thousands of dollars to stay in a cramped, closet-like dorm room, one ambitious college student named Bradley took his living situation into his own hands by building his own 230-square-feet abode, aptly named Rolling Quarters. After spending a year paying for on campus housing, Bradley decided it was time to build his own home, something that would give him his own personal space and designed to his taste. “Right out of high school I went and paid a year’s worth of rent and decided that wasn’t for me,” he said in an interview with Living Big In A Tiny House . “So I moved back home to save some money and pay for it all in cash to build it.” Related: Two college students build a tiny home for under $500 After purchasing a 27-foot-long trailer, he looked to Craigslist to find materials he could repurpose into his new home. A few things like the vinyl siding were bought new, but the total price of the project came in just under $15,000. Bradley’s self-built tiny home on wheels is just 230 square feet, but packs a large punch in terms of living space. The entrance of the home is through a lovely wooden deck with two rocking chairs set up to enjoy the surrounding wooded lot. The interior space has a comfy, cabin-like atmosphere with wooden flooring and wood-planked ceiling. The living space, which is air-conditioned, is at the heart of the home, with a medium sized pull-out sofa and tv, and a small nook for a desk. The kitchen, although compact, is incredibly efficient and conceals a number of space-saving and storage features. Additional storage is tucked under the stairs that lead up to the sleeping loft. Although Bradley now lives off campus, that doesn’t mean that his social life was affected. In fact, the ambitious student has had up to 25 guests in his home and even occasionally rents out Rolling Quarters on Airbnb . + Rolling Quarters Instagram Via Apartment Therapy Images via Rolling Quarters Instagram and Airbnb. Video via Living Big in a Tiny House Just 25 people hanging out comfortably in a tiny house. #saystheguywiththelofttohimself #tinyhouse #bradthebuilder #thow #tinyhouseonwheels #diythow #tinyhousemovement #diytinyhouse #minimalist #minimalism A post shared by Rolling Quarters Tiny House (@rolling_quarters_tinyhouse) on Oct 7, 2017 at 7:37am PDT

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Student ditches cramped dorm to live large in a self-built tiny house

Peru protects one of world’s last great untouched forests

February 15, 2018 by  
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In collaboration with local and international conservation groups, the Peruvian government has established Yaguas National Park in the country’s far eastern territory to permanently protect millions of acres of pristine rainforest . “This is a place where the forest stretches to the horizon,” Corine Vriesendorp, a conservation ecologist at The Field Museum in Chicago, told the New York Times . “This is one of the last great intact forests on the globe.” The forest is so massive that the clouds which form above it may impact precipitation in the Western United States while many unique species of animals and plants are found only in Yaguas. The National Park designation also protects land inhabited by several tribes of indigenous peoples. Peru’s most recently established national park joins a growing conservation network in South America , with Ecuador, Chile and Columbia also having recently created national parks. “Nowadays we’re trying to think big,” Avecita Chicchón of the Andes-Amazon Initiative told the New York Times , “You need these large areas to be connected.” Thanks to a vibrant and engaged civil society, policymakers of Latin America are shifting their views on climate change and environmentalism, increasingly recognizing the importance of taking action to protect natural resources. Related: Peru passes legislation to let roads slice through remote Amazon area Indigenous communities , of which there are at least six living in the Yaguas National Park area, also now have a voice in the process, something that has historically been denied these communities. Over the past two decades, federations of indigenous groups have educated scientists on the geology and ecology of the region while advocating for its protection from the federal government. Important to the local way of life, the natural resources of the region include endemic fish that serve as keystone species in the local ecosystem by transporting seeds across flooded forest plains. Vulnerable species such as tapirs and endangered species such as giant otters have also been sighted within the park. Though conservationists and local groups may have won an important victory, continued vigilance is key to long-term preservation.“For now, Yaguas is safe,” Gregory Asner, an ecologist at the Carnegie Institution for Science, told the New York Times , “but in the 20 years I’ve been working in the Amazon, I’ve learned the hard way that today’s remoteness is tomorrow’s access”. Via The New York Times Images via Depositphotos  and Lenora Enking/Flickr    

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Peru protects one of world’s last great untouched forests

This all-natural native corn is bejeweled with brilliantly colored kernels

January 15, 2017 by  
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Through his quest to reconnect to his roots, Barnes isolated several traditional strains of seeds that fell to the wayside when his ancestors traveled to what’s now Oklahoma in the 1800s . Through years of selective growing , Barnes grew corn that looks bejeweled, creating a colorful celebration of native heirloom varieties of corn. Related: Plant a Wish Restores Native Plant Habitats Around America Barnes didn’t hoard the wealth, however, sharing corn seeds with Native American tribe elders and other growers he encountered. According to SeedBroadcast , “…he was able to reintroduce specific corn types to the elders of those tribes, and this helped their people in reclaiming their cultural and spiritual identities. Their corn was, to them, literally the same as their blood line, their language, and their sense of who they were.” One such grower was Greg Schoen. The two became friends in the early ’90s , and Schoen took the rainbow corn to a new level, creating hybrids by planting the rainbow corn next to typical yellow corn. Schoen eventually passed the seeds to the non-profit organization Native Seeds/SEARCH , who now sell the seeds online . They also protect the seeds in a bank containing around 2,000 rare varieties . Native Seeds/SEARCH began during a project to design sustainable food sources with Native Americans. They continually heard that people wanted to plant the seeds their grandparents did , so the organization started to protect ” endangered traditional seeds ” and the diversity of plants present specifically in the American Southwest. The fabulous corn kernels possess an outer layer tougher than most , which means they aren’t the best for backyard corn-on-the-cob chomping, but they can be either ground for cornmeal or popped like popcorn. You can purchase a packet of the seeds for $4.95 here , and profits go right back to the organization to continue their conservation efforts. Via My Modern Met and Lost At E Minor Images via Glass Gem Corn Facebook

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This all-natural native corn is bejeweled with brilliantly colored kernels

BVN Donovan Hill’s Passive Solar Australian PlantBank Houses 25,000 Indigenous Seeds

June 13, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of BVN Donovan Hill’s Passive Solar Australian PlantBank Houses 25,000 Indigenous Seeds Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Australian native plants , Australian PlantBank , Australian royal botanic gardens , Australian seeds , BVN Donovan Hill , cross-ventilation , Cumberland plain forest , gas boosted solar hot water , native plants , native seeds , passive design , plant nursery , plantbank , thermal labyrinth

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BVN Donovan Hill’s Passive Solar Australian PlantBank Houses 25,000 Indigenous Seeds

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