This staggered, residential tower is draped with greenery in Quito

October 4, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This staggered, residential tower is draped with greenery in Quito

Acclaimed architecture firm Safdie Architects has been tapped to design a new residential tower that’s expected to be one of the tallest in Quito , Ecuador. Rising to 24 stories, the eye-catching project — dubbed Qorner — features a staggered tower with large garden terraces on every floor. Created in collaboration with local construction firm Uribe & Schwarzkopf, the striking high-rise will also feature operable glass walls for residents to embrace indoor-outdoor living and take advantage of Quito’s year-round temperate temperatures. Oriented to face the city’s central park, La Carolina, at the corner of the popular shopping street Avenida Portugal, Qorner mirrors the neighboring park’s lush environment in its design. In addition to the double-height garden terraces on each floor, the north facade of the building is partly covered with a dramatic living wall planted with native vegetation. A tree-lined infinity-edge swimming pool and garden top the roof. The projecting terraces on the east and west faces of the tower help shield full-height glazed openings from the sun and create a variety of double-height corner terraces that boast views in multiple directions. Perimeter concrete walls and columns as well as a central stabilization core were used to create a column-free interior with maximum flexibility. Related: Nature-inspired housing mimics the curvature of the landscape in Chongqing “We pride ourselves on developing projects unique to the place and program, and at the same time, incorporating principles that have long guided our work,” Moshe Safdie said. “While our projects around the world are diverse, our principles remain steadfast for each one: access to green space , the maximization of daylight and views in each dwelling, and fostering a sense of a ‘vertical neighborhood’ wherein each apartment forms part of a greater whole.” The Qorner is slated for completion in 2020. + Safdie Architects Images via Safdie Architects

See more here: 
This staggered, residential tower is draped with greenery in Quito

A hygrothermal-optimized house boasts thermal comfort with volcano views

October 4, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A hygrothermal-optimized house boasts thermal comfort with volcano views

Known for its hot and humid summers, the Costa Rican town of Naranjo de Alajuela can be a tricky place to build a cool and comfortable home with a small energy footprint. Yet San Rafael de Escazú-based design studio 10?84? Arquitectura shows that crafting a naturally cool home can be a breeze if you employ the right passive design strategies. One such example can be seen in the VV Residence, a 2,023-square-foot abode that features a well-ventilated environment as well as a strong connection to nature, including spectacular northern vistas of three volcanoes and the Central Valley. The key to the design of VV Residence was 10?84? Arquitectura’s approach to the home’s hygrothermal properties, an assessment that led to careful management of the building’s heat and moisture so as to prevent early degradation and homeowner discomfort. To that end, the one-bedroom home was strategically oriented to minimize excessive thermal load, and openings were maximized to capitalize on the existing views of nature and promote natural ventilation . A solar study informed the placement of sun overhangs and blinds; the north and south-facing facades, for instance, were constructed with vertical and horizontal solar shades to protect the interior from direct solar radiation. To promote natural ventilation and passive cooling, the architects designed double-height spaces and installed glass louver windows. Ample glazing also lets in plenty of natural light to help reduce energy demands. Moreover, VV Residence is equipped with a rainwater harvesting system that supplies water for home sanitation and irrigation as well as solar hot water heaters. To reduce landscape impact, the building’s steel structure was pre-cut offsite, and the surrounding landscape design incorporated existing native species. Related: Natural stone and an expansive green roof blend the stunning Gozu House into the Andes Mountains “Through the incorporation of various passive design strategies, the VV Residence reaches a high performance level in reducing its environmental impact and energy use during its life cycle,” the architects explained. “The project achieves a high hygrothermal comfort rating while taking full advantage of its surrounding environment to create optimal living spaces without sacrificing connections with nature and the surrounding landscape.” + 10?84? Arquitectura Via ArchDaily Images by Adrián Aguilar González

Read more from the original source:
A hygrothermal-optimized house boasts thermal comfort with volcano views

3XN unveils competition-winning designs for Denmarks Climatorium

October 3, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on 3XN unveils competition-winning designs for Denmarks Climatorium

Danish architectural practice 3XN Architects recently won a competition for the Climatorium, Denmark’s new international climate center that will be located in Lemvig. Created in collaboration with urban development consultancy SLA and technical advisory company Orbicon, the winning entry will help establish Lemvig as a center for climate change adaptation and support the country’s role as an exporter of climate solutions. Slated for completion in 2020, the sculptural waterfront building will serve as a public forum for knowledge, education, innovation and development projects that can promote climate-related growth and job opportunities. Inspired by the coastal location, the architects have integrated a wave motif to the entrance section of the two-story structure. The surrounding landscape, named the Climate Wedge, also mimics the local environment with its undulating shape structured with meteorological isobar lines in reference to the city’s wind conditions. The outdoor space is planted with native , low-maintenance vegetation and includes sheltered spaces where the public can gather and reconnect with the harbor front. A site-specific approach was taken to the building design as well. The Climatorium is carefully sized to match the existing scale of the other waterfront buildings and is clad in a simple material palette of wood, concrete and steel in a nod to the nearby boat halls. A ground-floor glass facade helps activate the building on the ground level and attracts passersby to come and visit exhibitions about climate change or enjoy food in the cafe. The lower floor can also be used for conferences, concerts and other events. Related: This dreamy Malibu beach house is designed to withstand climate change “We have aimed to create a building that tells the story about climate ,” said Jan Ammundsen, Senior Partner and Head of Design at 3XN. “The building has a rectilinear, stringent expression but forms a wave shape that lends it a distinct and easily decoded identity. The wave tells the story of the site and also refers to the serious challenges we face as a result of climate change.” + 3XN Architects Images via 3XN Architects

Read the original: 
3XN unveils competition-winning designs for Denmarks Climatorium

Exotic Natives: Appreciating & Growing Hardy Orchids

September 7, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Exotic Natives: Appreciating & Growing Hardy Orchids

Orchids are fancy, exotic flowers that evoke steaming jungles and … The post Exotic Natives: Appreciating & Growing Hardy Orchids appeared first on Earth911.com.

Read more here:
Exotic Natives: Appreciating & Growing Hardy Orchids

Nativars and Heavy Lifters in the Garden

August 20, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Nativars and Heavy Lifters in the Garden

Native plants in nurseries are often hybrids, native species crossed … The post Nativars and Heavy Lifters in the Garden appeared first on Earth911.com.

View post:
Nativars and Heavy Lifters in the Garden

Earth911 Podcast, August 20, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear

August 20, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Earth911 Podcast, August 20, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear

Ernie Roberts, sustainability manager for computer accessories maker Belkin, joins … The post Earth911 Podcast, August 20, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear appeared first on Earth911.com.

View post:
Earth911 Podcast, August 20, 2018: Sustainability in Your Ear

5 Native Beauties to Grow Now

July 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on 5 Native Beauties to Grow Now

Past generations thought of native plants as weeds — probably … The post 5 Native Beauties to Grow Now appeared first on Earth911.com.

More:
5 Native Beauties to Grow Now

Skip the Plastic Wrap: 4 Food Wrap Alternatives

July 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Skip the Plastic Wrap: 4 Food Wrap Alternatives

Food wrap choices have long focused on petroleum-base options, but … The post Skip the Plastic Wrap: 4 Food Wrap Alternatives appeared first on Earth911.com.

Go here to read the rest:
Skip the Plastic Wrap: 4 Food Wrap Alternatives

Lush rooftop oasis flourishes on a renovated Art Deco townhouse in Mexico City

April 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Lush rooftop oasis flourishes on a renovated Art Deco townhouse in Mexico City

Formerly a derelict Art Deco structure, Casa Verne has been reborn as a contemporary family home with a secluded getaway in the center of a busy Mexico City neighborhood. Zeller & Moye renovated the 1930s townhouse and took care to preserve period features while injecting new modern touches. The crowning achievement can be found on the roof, where the architects created a lush garden and oasis of native plants. Zeller & Moye’s renovation of the townhouse stripped away internal walls to create more spacious living areas. New roof lights pull in natural light to the previously dim interior while whitewashed walls create a bright and airy atmosphere. Dark-stained wood used on the floors of the first level and on the staircase to the rooftop terrace provide a grounding contrast. Related: Green-roofed timber cabin floats above the ground in Mexico City The service spaces are located on the ground floor, while the main living areas on the first floor are accessed via a striking pink marble staircase. The architects also added a new top floor that houses the master bedroom suite and garden that’s surrounded by high walls for privacy. The floors of the extension as well as the garden path are finished in cut marble pebbles, a reference to Mexico City’s lost riverbeds and lakes. + Zeller & Moye Via Dezeen Images © Omar Mun?oz, Juan Carlos Garza

View post:
Lush rooftop oasis flourishes on a renovated Art Deco townhouse in Mexico City

Light-filled family home sensitively embraces a British Islands native landscape

April 17, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Light-filled family home sensitively embraces a British Islands native landscape

When DLM Architects was asked to create an energy-efficient and sustainable family home in St Peter Port of Guernsey, the site’s densely planted vegetation proved both a boon and a challenge. The local planning department had imposed many site restrictions due to the number of protected trees, but after four years of negotiation the architects managed to settle on a solution resulting in a beautiful and light-filled dwelling with a sensitive environmental footprint. Named ‘The Glade’ after the its location in a clearing surrounded by forest, the new-build family home occupies a spacious 3,230 square feet of living space spread out across two floors in a roughly L-shaped plan. To preserve privacy and views from and to neighboring properties, the home is partly sunken into the site’s natural topography with the basement set into an existing swimming pool excavation from the previous build. Guernsey granite and reclaimed brick , mostly sourced on site, clad the ground floor. Cladding is split on the upper floor, with the eastern side featuring a steel-framed cantilever covered in a living wall of 4,000 plants of 13 native species to camouflage the building into the tree canopy. The living wall also doubles as an extra layer of insulation while providing a buffer from acoustic and air pollution from the nearby roads. A double-glazed link housing the staircase separates the plant-covered east wing from the west end where the second level is clad in cedar. Related: Gorgeous modern home makes stunning use of recycled and salvaged materials Open-plan living is prioritized throughout the home, as is ample glazing to maintain a fluid connection with the outdoors. A natural materials palette is also used throughout the interior. “A skin of locally reclaimed brick is coated with lime slurry, raw pigment plasters line the walls, with grey limestone to the floors, oak joinery, machined brass ironmongery, a bespoke raw steel staircase and furnishings and a reclaimed granite trough as the cloakroom sink,” wrote the architects. “Where possible local materials and fabrication has been utilised delivering a soft traditional character within a contemporary envelope.” + DLM Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Peter Landers

Original post: 
Light-filled family home sensitively embraces a British Islands native landscape

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1983 access attempts in the last 7 days.