EPA lifts ban on pesticide proven to be toxic to honeybees

July 17, 2019 by  
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The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has re-approved a pesticide for use throughout the country despite its known toxicity to honeybee populations. The chemical , sulfoxaflor, is produced by DowDupont, a major chemical company that contributed $1 million to President Trump’s campaign. Sulfoxaflor was originally approved for use by the EPA in 2013, but the approval was adamantly opposed and challenged by beekeepers and environmentalists. In 2015, the U.S. Court of Appeals ordered the EPA to discontinue the chemical’s approval since DowDupont could not provide enough evidence proving their product is not harmful to bee populations. Despite this ruling, the government continued to offer “emergency approvals” of its use and now has officially re-approved its use on over 190 million acres of crops. Their product is now approved for use on corn, strawberries, citrus, pumpkins, pineapples and soybeans. Related: Native bees are going extinct without much buzz Although the EPA’s own studies provide evidence that the substance is “highly toxic to honeybees at all life stages” and similarly toxic to native bee populations, the EPA announced it was thrilled to lift the ban on such a highly effective agricultural product. “Scientists have long said pesticides like sulfoxaflor are the cause of the unprecedented colony collapse. Letting sulfoxaflor back on the market is dangerous for our food system, economy and environment, ” says a legal representative from Earthjustice. Both honey bees and native bees have seen a rapid decline in their numbers over the past few decades. This winter, beekeepers reportedly lost over 35 percent of their colonies. Since 1947, the population of honeybees has dropped from 6 million to under 2.4 million. “The Trump EPA’s reckless approval of this bee-killing pesticide across 200 million acres of crops like strawberries and watermelon without any public process is a terrible blow to imperiled pollinators,” says the director of the Center for Biological Diversity. Via Huff Post Image via Johann Piber

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EPA lifts ban on pesticide proven to be toxic to honeybees

No one knows why these bees build incredible spiraling hives

February 15, 2018 by  
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Caution: after what you are about to see, you may never be satisfied with run-of-the-mill beehives again. These design-savvy bees weren’t content to live in generic boxes like most bees, so they create spectacular spiraling hives that look like they could have come out of the mind of Zaha Hadid herself. Image courtesy of Tim Heard Known as sugarbag bees, Tetragonula carbonaria live in Australia and create unusual single-layer spiraling hives that are completely unlike flat beehives. There is only one entrance to each hive, and it is coated in a sticky layer that helps trap pathogens to prevent them from entering the hive. That bit of extra defense is nice, since sugarbag bees don’t sting – they bite. Image courtesy of Tim Heard Related: These tenacious bees create sturdy nests by carving out sandstone Ok, technically, sugarbag bees may not be design-obsessed builders. In fact, scientists aren’t really sure why they build spiral hives (which means they might just be crazy about innovative architecture , right?). It could be that the design improves navigation or air circulation, which is crap in traditional honeycombs. Whatever the reason, we dig it. Entomologist and ex-CSIRO research scientist Tim Heard has kept sugarbag bees for over 3 decades, and he’s keen to educate people about these amazing insects. According to his website , “stingless bees are highly social insects, with one queen and thousands of workers who live together in a protected place, which, in nature, is usually in a hollow tree.” If you want to learn more about these remarkable bees, head to Tim Heard’s website , Facebook page , or check out his Australian Native Bee Book . + Sugarbag Bees Via core77 Images via Tim Heard , Stephan Ridgeway and Wikimedia Image courtesy of Tim Heard Image courtesy of Tim Heard Image courtesy of Tim Heard "Bu nas?l bir #zeka! ?" deyip ?a??raca??n?z bir tür: #Ar?lar ? Resimlerde, #Avustralya kökenli "#sugarbag #bees" (#bilimsel ad?, #Trigona #carbonaria) olan ar?lar?n yapt???, tamamen #do?al #petek ?ekilleri. (#honey #hives) A post shared by Zeka ?stasyonu by @gokler (@zekaistasyonu) on Feb 3, 2018 at 12:37am PST

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No one knows why these bees build incredible spiraling hives

Breathtaking Macro Portraits of Bees by Sam Droege

January 24, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Breathtaking Macro Portraits of Bees by Sam Droege Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: amazing been photos , bee , bee conservation , macro photography , native bee , native bees , native plants , pollinator , sam droege , Sam Droege bee photos , usgs bee inventory and monitoring lab        

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Breathtaking Macro Portraits of Bees by Sam Droege

NBBJ Designs a Pair of Interconnected Towers for Tencent’s New Headquarters in Shenzhen

January 24, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of NBBJ Designs a Pair of Interconnected Towers for Tencent’s New Headquarters in Shenzhen Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable skyscraper” , carbon emission cut , china architecture , HQ towers , NBBJ architecture , NBBJ Shenzhen , NBBJ Tencent , office towers , office towers Shenzhen , Shenzhen architecture , skyscraper design , Tencent Corporate Headquarters , Tencent Shenzhen        

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NBBJ Designs a Pair of Interconnected Towers for Tencent’s New Headquarters in Shenzhen

Beautiful Geometric Facade Protects King Fahad National Library from the Hot Saudi Sun

January 24, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Beautiful Geometric Facade Protects King Fahad National Library from the Hot Saudi Sun Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cultural center , fabric facade , Gerber Architekten , King Fahad National Library , library , Riyadh , saudi arabia , sun protection , sun shades , Teflon-coated fiberglass        

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Beautiful Geometric Facade Protects King Fahad National Library from the Hot Saudi Sun

New Study Reveals Air Pollution Increases the Power of Cyclones

January 24, 2014 by  
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A new report, published in Nature Communications , has revealed that the ever-increasing air pollution  from China and other Asian industrial countries is capable of increasing the power of winter cyclones in the northwest Pacific. Read the rest of New Study Reveals Air Pollution Increases the Power of Cyclones Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: air particles , air pollution , air pollution climate , asian industrial countries , Climate Change , cyclones , nature communications , tropical cyclones        

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New Study Reveals Air Pollution Increases the Power of Cyclones

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