Anti-pollution skincare products: Everything you need to know

April 1, 2019 by  
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Anti-pollution skincare products are the latest trend in the skincare industry. As people battle an increasingly toxic atmosphere, these products promise to combat harmful particles associated with pollution in major cities. These products work by cleansing the skin from nanoparticles that are absorbed from the air or by creating a protective barrier that acts as a shield against pollutants. But just how effective are anti-pollution skincare products? The need for pollution protection The call for beauty products that are anti-pollution has significantly increased as city dwellers around the world continue to battle poor air quality . The micro-particles present in pollution have been proven to age skin at a rate similar to the sun, leading many people to look for ways to protect their body. Online searches for skincare products that are anti-pollution have gone up some 73 percent this year alone. This shows how much people are concerned about the aging effects of pollution and how it harms skin. Related: Add this all-in-one natural skincare to your bathroom counter “We’re seeing an increasing global demand for skincare which counters pollution-related skin concerns including dull skin, inflammation, sensitized skin, blemishes, clogged pores and accelerated ageing,” Dr. Anna Persaud, the head of This Works makeup company, explained. Pollution causes skin issues Studies have shown that certain pollutants in the atmosphere can lead to skin-related problems. The University of British Columbia lead a study that connected nitrogen dioxide to dark spots on the skin. Nitrogen dioxide is a result of car exhaust and emissions from power plants. While people are more aware of the harmful effects of pollution, cities continue to battle poor air quality. In fact, the World Health Organization released a study in 2016 that showed how air pollution had increased eight percent over the previous five years. In densely populated cities around the world – such as Delhi and Beijing – the public is often warned about hazardous levels of air pollution. Indoor pollution is also a growing issue Air quality indoors is also something people need to be concerned about when it comes to skincare. Indoor pollution comes from a variety of sources, from cooking and heating to cleaning products that off-gas into the environment, all of which can damage the health of your skin. With people battling pollution at every turn, there is little wonder that the anti-pollution skincare industry has grown so much over the past decade. How does anti-pollution skincare work? Products that are marketed as anti-pollution help shield the skin from harmful dust particles, very similar to how sunscreens work. Other skincare products remove pollutants from the skin after you have been exposed. The most popular of these types of products are beauty masks, which cleanse the skin at a deeper level than traditional masks. Peach and Lilly , for example, offer a series of anti-pollution masks and other products that are aimed at reducing the effects of microparticles. While these products can remove harmful nanoparticles, there are no scientific studies to back up their effectiveness. The lack of data is largely due to the fact that anti-pollution skincare has not been around long. Another factor is that the products are only used once a day, and after the masks are removed the skin is once again open for exposure. Tips for choosing the best anti-pollution skincare products While masks can remove pollutants in the short-term, leave-on products are the best way to combat microparticles in the atmosphere. These types of products will protect you for longer durations of time and prevent your skin from coming into contact with harmful particles in the first place. You can also look for products that contain high levels of probiotics. These chemicals can help build up the skin’s natural defenses and form a barrier against pollution-related skin issues. That is not to say that anti-pollution masks are not beneficial, but they do leave the skin open to future attacks. The science behind anti-pollution skincare A lot of the anti-pollution skincare products feature vitamin C as the main ingredient. Vitamin C can lighten skin tone – which helps combat those dark spots linked to pollution – and decreases discoloration. Another common ingredient in these types of products are antioxidants, many of which are actually backed by science. Unfortunately, there are not a lot of studies that prove barrier products are effective at keeping particles from invading your skin. That does not mean they do not work, but more studies need to be done to prove just how effective they are in creating a pollution barrier. Given the popularity of these types of products , it won’t be long before additional research is completed. Fighting pollution While products that protect the skin are great, the bigger issue is fighting pollution at its source. Many cities are initiating eco-friendly policies to help curb emissions, but more work needs to be done if we are serious about combating the effects pollution has on our health. Unfortunately, companies that manufacture anti-pollution skincare products have little motivation to fight pollution at a large scale, as doing so would ultimately hurt their bottom line. Via The Guardian , Racked Images via Rawpixel , Moose Photos , Stux ,  AdinaVoicu ,  joiseyshowaa

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Anti-pollution skincare products: Everything you need to know

This tiny home allows a family of 3 to go off the grid in Maui

April 1, 2019 by  
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DIY home building is always an ambitious aspiration, but when it comes to building your own tiny home, it can be an entirely different beast. But that didn’t stop Maui natives Zeena and Shane Fontanilla from taking on the task to unbelievable results. The Fontanilla tiny home is 360 square feet of an incredible blend of beautiful design mixed with some impressive off-grid features such as solar power and a water catchment system that allows the family to use all of the rainwater that falls on the property to meet their water needs. After getting engaged, the couple decided to forgo buying a large family home that would lead to decades of debt, instead opting to built their own tiny home that would allow them to lead the life that they had dreamed of. They kicked off the project around 2014, doing most of the work themselves along with a little help from family, friends … and the television. Zeena told Design*Sponge , “Binge-watching Tiny House Nation on HGTV helped us hone in our ideal design.” Related: Serene off-grid tiny home sits tucked away in a Hawaiian rainforest The first step of the DIY home build for Zeena and Shane was designing their dream layout. The next step was finding a trailer that would suit their desired floor plan, which is where they hit their first obstacle. After searching Craiglist and other sites, they couldn’t locate a trailer that would fit what they had in mind. Instead of changing their plans, they decided to build a customized trailer. From there, they cut their own timber to create the frame of the home. The couple took about two years of working nights and weekends to build the off-grid tiny home of their dreams. Located on an expansive lot of idyllic farmland, the final result is 360 square feet of customized living space, complete with a spacious living room and double sleeping lofts. The interior is light-filled with high ceilings. Plenty of windows, all-white walls and dark timber accents, such as exposed ceiling beams, make the home bright and modern. In addition to its beautiful aesthetic, the tiny home operates completely off the grid. A solar array generates enough power for the family’s electricity needs. Additionally, a custom-made, 3,000-gallon water catchment system allows the family to use the water that falls on the property to fulfill the family’s water usage. To reduce energy use, the home is also equipped with energy-efficient appliances and a waterless composting toilet. You can keep up with the Fontanilla family’s tiny home living adventures on their Instagram page . + The Reveal Via Design*Sponge Photography by Stephanie Betsill via Zeena Fontanilla

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This tiny home allows a family of 3 to go off the grid in Maui

Ultrathin grass condoms could make safe sex better than ever

February 11, 2016 by  
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Australian researchers at the University of Queensland have found a way to make latex condoms thinner, stronger, and more flexible than anything else on the market. The scientists extracted nanocellulose from a native variety of grass, spinifex, and used it as an additive in ordinary latex rubber. While a grass condom might sound a little strange, it turns out that adding the natural nanoparticles to rubber actually enhances the latex’s natural properties. This could be the first step toward overcoming some of the most common complaints about condoms reducing sensation during sex, and even enhance safety by making them less likely to break. Read the rest of Ultrathin grass condoms could make safe sex better than ever

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Ultrathin grass condoms could make safe sex better than ever

Scientists Find that Tiny Particles in Clothing, Toys and Cosmetics May Damage DNA

April 10, 2014 by  
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The makeup , clothing and sunscreen that you use and wear every single day could possibly be damaging your DNA, according to a new study from MIT. Nanoparticles like zinc oxide and nanoscale silver, used by manufacturers to kill microbes, extend shelf life or enhance texture, have been shown to be toxic to cells. These particles produce free radicals which can accumulate in the body and cause harm to DNA. Read the rest of Scientists Find that Tiny Particles in Clothing, Toys and Cosmetics May Damage DNA Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: anti bacterials damage cells , anti bacterials damage DNA , cerium oxide damages DNA , cerium oxide health risks , harvard school of public health , iron oxide damages DNA , iron oxide health risks , MIT , nanoparticles , nanoparticles damage cells , nanoparticles damage DNA , silicone dioxide damages DNA , silicone dioxide health risks , silver damages DNA , silver health risks , zinc oxide damages DNA , zinc oxide health risks

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Scientists Find that Tiny Particles in Clothing, Toys and Cosmetics May Damage DNA

Rice University Develops Solar Steam Sanitizer For Developing World

July 23, 2013 by  
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Over two billion people on the planet lack access to adequate sanitation. That means dirty water, disease, and contaminated medical supplies. Without access to proper infrastructure providing plumbing or electricity, finding a way to create and bring off-the-grid technology to areas of the developing world has proven to be a substantial challenge. A team of engineers at Rice University have captured the power of the sun to invent solar steam sterilization unit that uses light-absorbing nanoparticles that can power autoclaves and sanitize human waste . The project has been awarded a grant by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation as a part of their efforts to improve the living conditions of the world’s poor. Read the rest of Rice University Develops Solar Steam Sanitizer For Developing World Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: autoclave , bill & melinda gates foundation , developing world , human waste , kenya , medical equipment , nanoparticles , naomi halas , rice university , sanitation , sanivation , solar steam system , sun        

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Rice University Develops Solar Steam Sanitizer For Developing World

Amazing Chairs Made From Recycled Washing Machine Parts

July 23, 2013 by  
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Israeli industrial designer Antonina sees old defunct washing machines as more than just outdated appliances – she uses them as building blocks to create some pretty spiffy furniture. Her project “I Used to Be a Washing Machine” shows how the parts of just one machine can be transformed into three different stylish chairs. The designer has even included a set of DIY instructions, so that handy homeowners can try their hand at turning yesterday’s laundry set into today’s living room furniture. Read the rest of Amazing Chairs Made From Recycled Washing Machine Parts Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Antonina , eco design , green design , I used to be a washing machine , recycled washing machine , sustainable design , upcycled furniture        

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3M’s New Nanoparticle Technology Could Make Natural Gas Cars Cheaper and More Attractive

March 2, 2012 by  
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Gas prices have increased at record levels this month, with prices climbing for 20 days in a row , and as gas prices rise, interest in more fuel efficient vehicles go up as well. Automakers have continued to focus on hybrids, electric vehicles and more efficient gasoline and diesel engines, but one fuel source has been largely ignored, natural gas. There are several reasons for this (read on to learn more), but the good news is that several companies, like 3M, are working on nanoparticle technology that could make natural gas cars more attractive. While as green transportation supporters, we think it’s important to point out that natural gas is a sort of temporary band-aid that should not distract us from the ultimate goal of getting truly sustainable electric cars on the road, we’re still excited to hear about 3M’s strides to advance this cleaner alternative to gasoline for the time being. Read the rest of 3M’s New Nanoparticle Technology Could Make Natural Gas Cars Cheaper and More Attractive Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3m , automotive , chesapeake energy , green technology , Honda , honda civic , nanoparticle technology , nanoparticles , natural gas , natural gas buses , natural gas fleets , natural gas trucks

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3M’s New Nanoparticle Technology Could Make Natural Gas Cars Cheaper and More Attractive

Australians Ditching Sunscreen and Risking Skin Cancer to Avoid Nanoparticles

February 24, 2012 by  
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Australia reportedly has one of the highest rates of skin cancer in the world, so why are many Aussies opting to ditch their sunscreen ? According to a recent study, 17 percent of the respondents down-under said they would rather risk getting skin cancer than wear lotions that contain nanoparticles . The results of the study highlight a growing concern about nanoscale products and the dangers they pose to public health. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: australia , eco-fashion , Ethical Fashion , green fashion , nanomaterials , nanoparticles , nanotechnology , silver nanoparticles , silver nanotechnology , sunscreen , Sustainable Fashion , sustainable style

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Australians Ditching Sunscreen and Risking Skin Cancer to Avoid Nanoparticles

Nanoparticles or No-No particles?

December 13, 2009 by  
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Image: Flickr, Argonne National Laboratory Could Nanoparticles Cause “Dramatic Mutations?” Nanoparticles, hailed as the solution for everything from the next generation of micro-electronic gadgets to curing cancer , are poorly understood. When scientists first mastered the technology for creating and manipulating microscopic balls and tubes, toxicologists speculated that the tiny particles would have properties similar to the same chemicals on an every-day scale.

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Nanoparticles or No-No particles?

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