New nanomaterial pulls hydrogen from seawater to power fuel cells

October 4, 2017 by  
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Hydrogen can be obtained from seawater to power fuel cells , but the process is typically costly because of the electricity required. Researchers created a nanomaterial that can do the job more efficiently. According to the University of Central Florida (UCF), the advance “could someday lead to a new source of the clean-burning fuel .” UCF assistant professor Yang Yang has been working on solar hydrogen splitting for almost a decade. In the process, a photocatalyst sets off a chemical reaction with energy from light . But the photocatalysts don’t work as well in seawater – they don’t stand up well to salt and seawater’s biomass. Yang’s research team came up with a new catalyst that’s not only good for splitting purified water in a laboratory, but can better endure seawater and even harvest light from a broader spectrum. Related: Scientists develop new way to generate electricity via seawater Yang said, “We can absorb much more solar energy from the light than the conventional material. Eventually, if it is commercialized, it would be good for Florida’s economy. We have a lot of seawater around Florida and a lot of really good sunshine.” He said in many cases it’s better to use the sun’s energy to create a chemical fuel than to generate electricity with solar panels . Hydrogen gas can be transported and stored easily. UCF said it’s relatively cheap and easy to make the catalyst, which is comprised of a hybrid material. The journal Energy & Environmental Science published the research the end of September. Scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Washington and Tsinghua University in China collaborated on the study. Yang and his team plan to continue researching how to scale up the catalyst fabrication, and to work on splitting hydrogen from wastewater with the catalyst. Via the University of Central Florida Images via the University of Central Florida

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New nanomaterial pulls hydrogen from seawater to power fuel cells

Scientists Turn Problematic Plastic Bags Into a High-Tech Nanomaterial

October 8, 2013 by  
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Non-biodegradable plastic bags are the scourge of landfills and picturesque landscapes everywhere. Scientists at the University of Adelaide in Australia have invented a process to transform the pesky pieces of trash into a high-tech nanomaterial. Their method uses plastic to inexpensively make carbon nanotube membranes which are found in sensing, filtration, energy storage, and medical applications. Read the rest of Scientists Turn Problematic Plastic Bags Into a High-Tech Nanomaterial Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: adelaide school of chemical engineering , alumina prous membrane , australia , Carbon Nanotube , dusan losic , nanomaterial , non-biodegradable plastic bags , plastic bags , plastic waste stream , Single-use plastic bag , University of Adelaide        

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Scientists Turn Problematic Plastic Bags Into a High-Tech Nanomaterial

Click & Grow Smart Herb Garden’s Second Generation Lets You Cultivate Fresh Food Indoors

March 28, 2013 by  
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Spring has officially arrived, although you wouldn’t know it in many parts of the country . With all of that snow on the ground, what is an anxious gardener to do? Just in time for planting season, Click & Grow is about to release its second-generation Smart Herb Garden for indoor cultivation. Unlike its first incarnation, which only allowed room for one plant, its new model lets you raise up to three herbs at once. Seeds come included and embedded in a cartridge, ready to be inserted into the growing bed. The design now also features a built-in light that can be plugged in to let artificial sun shine whenever it is needed. Read the rest of Click & Grow Smart Herb Garden’s Second Generation Lets You Cultivate Fresh Food Indoors Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: AA battery , click & grow , cultivation , growth medium , herbs , Indoor , kickstarter , led light , nanomaterial , second generation , seed cartridge , smart herb garden

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Click & Grow Smart Herb Garden’s Second Generation Lets You Cultivate Fresh Food Indoors

D*Haus to Launch a Kickstarter Campaign to Develop Shape-Shifting Home and Products

March 28, 2013 by  
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D*Haus , the ultra-innovative company behind the the first dynamic house in the world , is set to launch a kickstarter campaign on April 3 to raise funds for the development of their two flagship products, the D*Dynamic home and the D*Table home furnishing. Their shape-shifting products are based on a mathematical theory by Henry Ernest Dudeny, which explains how to compose a perfect square using equilateral triangles. Read the rest of D*Haus to Launch a Kickstarter Campaign to Develop Shape-Shifting Home and Products Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: D*Dynamic , D*Haus , D*Haus kickstarter campaign , D*Table , dynamic house , henry ernest dudeny mathematical theory , house changes shape according to seasons , house folds in on itself in the winter , house opens up in the summer , shape shifting house

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D*Haus to Launch a Kickstarter Campaign to Develop Shape-Shifting Home and Products

Breakthrough? Ordinary Paper + Ink + Nanotubes = Battery

December 8, 2009 by  
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Image: Stanford Carbon Nanotubes FTW (Again) Stanford researchers have discovered a way to rapidly make batteries and supercapacitors with ink that contains carbon nanotubes and ordinary paper. As shown in the video below , they simply coat the paper with the special ink, put it in an oven and out comes a highly conductive storage device.

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Breakthrough? Ordinary Paper + Ink + Nanotubes = Battery

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