Triple-skin facade brings daylight, fresh air and beauty to a tropical home

January 8, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Hanoi-based design studio Nghia Architect has completed Maison A, a beautiful home that brings to life the cherished childhood memories of the client. Located in Nam ??nh, a coastal village southeast of Vietnam’s capital of Hanoi, the house was created for the client’s aging mother and is large enough to accommodate her children and grandchildren who visit during the holidays. Inspired by the traditional countryside vernacular, Maison A is built for comfortable modern living and features a triple-skin facade that brings daylight, fresh air and a beautiful floral appearance to the home. Spread over an area of 78 square meters, Maison A catches the eye with its sculptural red exterior constructed of floral ventilation bricks handmade in the Bat Trang Village. The perforated sections let in daylight and ventilation into the house, while the bricks are customized with hollow interiors that trap air to serve as a heat-insulating layer. The second layer of the triple-skin facade is a layer of plants that provides additional privacy and a pleasant microclimate . The third “skin” is operable glass, which the mother can close during large storms. Related: Solar screen brings beauty and heat relief to a Vietnam home To recall the many banana trees that grew around the client’s childhood home, the architects worked with local craftsmen who used a hand-pressed intaglio method to imprint banana leaves onto parts of the concrete facade. Inside, local stone craftsmen were employed to turn locally sourced laterite stone (called “hive stone”) into the family bedroom wall. “Maison A mixes the countryside traditions with modern comfort in-depth material research to create an ancestral place for the mother and her returning children,” the architects explain. “The brutalist composition of local materials reflects the richness of the surrounding cultures while the design elevates them to higher grounds. From here, the memory of the family is recorded in each brick and passed down through generations.” + Nghia Architect Images by Tuan Nghia Nguyen

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Triple-skin facade brings daylight, fresh air and beauty to a tropical home

Zero-waste packaging is coming to a freezer aisle near you

January 8, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

This past year, frozen food made a comeback thanks to healthier and tastier options hitting your grocer’s freezer, and the debunking of the myth that fresh is always healthier than frozen. For the first time in five years , the frozen food market has grown, and consumers are starting to see frozen products as a healthy option for easy meal prep. Now, one grocer is taking freezer food to the next level with bulk bins and zero-waste packaging. In recent years, frozen food companies have shortened their ingredients lists by removing artificial ingredients from frozen dinners and meal kits, and they have also introduced new flavors and recipes . Recent studies have shown that frozen fruits and veggies are healthier than fresher fare because of the fast-freezing techniques that lock in the nutrients. Fresh foods gradually lose their nutrients during the time it takes to go from the farm to your kitchen. Related: Major supermarket chain is the first in the UK to remove palm oil from all its food Now, to capitalize on this growing trend, the Globus Hypermarket in the Czech Republic has introduced a self-service frozen food section that minimizes packaging . The grocer has set up displays of various frozen fruits and veggies — everything from broccoli and cauliflower to plums and berries — and customers can scoop up as much as they need and take the items home in reusable packaging. There are also processed frozen food items and frozen meal kits available, which aren’t as healthy as the frozen fruits and veggies. But offering a no-waste version to these treats is better for the planet. The rising popularity of frozen food could mean a lot less food waste , which is a huge global problem. In the U.S. alone, 40 percent of the food produced ends up in the trash. When consumers opt for frozen over fresh, the food doesn’t go bad nearly as fast. Compared to the enormous waste that goes with takeout meals (plastic containers, cutlery, paper napkins and plastic bags), opting for frozen food can be a lot better for the environment, especially when it comes without packaging. + Globus Hypermarket Via TreeHugger Image via Shutterstock

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Zero-waste packaging is coming to a freezer aisle near you

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