The many ways fungi are saving our planet

April 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The many ways fungi are saving our planet

Fungi are living organisms that support the ecosystem of the entire planet. Most people associate mushrooms with fungi, but in reality, mushrooms merely make up the ‘flower’ portion of some species of fungi. Up to 90% of the fungi associated with the mushroom is underground as part of a web called mycelium . Scientists are continually discovering ways fungi enhance the circle of life. The mushroom and mycelium components of fungi are currently a hot topic in the research world, because there are already over 100,000 identified varieties with thousands more being discovered annually. Together, these fungi species are unlocking solutions for cleaning up the environment, developing greener construction and product materials and contributing significant medicinal benefits. What are fungi? Fungi are basically the digestive tract of the planet. As a carbon-based substance, fungi work in conjunction with all living or decaying things. Whether that is a tree that has fallen in the woods or an animal that dies along the side of the road, mycelium works below-ground to facilitate decomposition. Mycelium is a massive filter that removes toxins from the soil , improving water quality as a result. Related: How fungi made Earth’s atmosphere livable This network also cycles nutrients from one location to another, essentially transporting food and water from one plant to another. It’s also believed they send messages throughout the forest that support the success of other fungi as well as overall plant life. In scientific papers reviewed as recently as two months ago, evidence has come to light indicating fungal fossils may date back at least 715 to 810 million years and possibly even over one billion years ago. Whether that can be proven or not, most scientists accept that fungi have survived on the planet since at least 400 million years ago. Further, researchers give credit to fungi for their critical role in facilitating the continued existence of the planet. Fungi and climate change In addition to supporting the entire plant kingdom, fungi are recognized as a promising weapon in the fight against climate change . While some of these discoveries happen in a lab, others are happening in nature as we go about our daily lives. As outlined in a new documentary, Fantastic Fungi , fungi are indiscriminate in their consumption of organic material. As an example of this cycle, fungi can break down carbon-based diesel oil, growing mushrooms in its wake. Then birds, bees and bugs feed, spread seeds and pollinate as a result, supporting more than just the surrounding area. In fact, many scientists believe mushrooms might be one solution to ending the crisis bees are facing, because mushrooms’ antiviral characteristics may offer protection from damaging chemicals in other plants. Fungi can likely clean up other aspects of the environment, too. According to the State of the World’s Fungi 2018 report , the mushroom Aspergillus tubingensis has the ability to grow directly on the surface of plastic and has properties that actually deteriorate the material. Yes, apparently some mushrooms can eat plastic . Even more amazing is the discovery that fungi were found consuming radiation off the walls of the abandoned Chernobyl plant. In fact, three species were found to be absorbing the radiation and turning it into energy for growth. In essence, they were feeding off radiation. Mushroom waste becomes biofuel Natural waste from mushroom production can also be converted into biofuel . According to research published in Science Advances , the research team revealed that a naturally occurring bacterium called Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum (TG57), isolated from waste generated after harvesting mushrooms, is capable of directly converting cellulose (a plant-based material) to biobutanol, leading to a much cleaner way to produce biofuel and reduce emissions from fossil fuels. Products made from fungi Product manufacturers are also looking toward fungi in material development due to properties that allow them to naturally decompose at the end of their life cycle. Fungi are being used as a substitute for environmental nemesis polystyrene foam , animal leather and chemical-laden building materials. One company, Coeio, has even created a mushroom-infused burial suit, explaining that a human body will break down faster and give back to the Earth sooner while the fungal properties filter out any toxic chemicals the body has acquired while living. Fungi for health Fungi are also in the spotlight for exciting medical advancements, such as treating anxiety and depression with psilocybin . Fungi could also help fight against cognitive decline, according to a recent study . Plus, fungi are already part of our everyday life in ways you may not even recognize. In addition to the mushrooms on your pizza , fungi are important for fermentation, which creates alcohol, leavened bread and much more. The list of possible ways fungi are saving our planet is nearly as long as the list of species themselves. With an increasing interest in research, the possibilities for finding innovative ways to use fungi in the future are exciting and promising. Images via Pixabay

See the rest here: 
The many ways fungi are saving our planet

These amazing zero-waste buildings were grown from mushrooms

June 27, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on These amazing zero-waste buildings were grown from mushrooms

Could the buildings of the future be grown instead of built? Brunel University student Aleksi Vesaluoma has found a way to grow living structures using mushroom mycelium . Vesaluoma worked with architecture firm Astudio to create these Grown Structures, which offer a waste-free , organic alternative to conventional construction materials When mycelium grows on organic materials such as straw, it binds the matter together like glue. Aleksi Vesaluoma and Astudio mixed oyster mushroom mycelium with cardboard and poured the material into tube-shaped cotton bandages. These tubular forms were then placed inside a ventilated greenhouse for four weeks to grow and strengthen. This process turns organic waste into nutrients for the growth of the mycelium – and it’s completely waste-free, since the structure is 100% biodegradable. Related: 3D-Printed Mycelium Chair Sprouts Living Mushrooms! Grown Structures have prompted several attempts at commercialization in the USA and the Netherlands. The fact that the fungi which grow on the structures can also be eaten makes the project perfect for pop-up restaurants . + Brunel University London + Astudio Via Dezeen

Here is the original post: 
These amazing zero-waste buildings were grown from mushrooms

11 green building materials that are way better than concrete

July 8, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on 11 green building materials that are way better than concrete

1. Straw Bales Rather than relying on new research and technology, straw bale building hearkens back to the days when homes were built from natural, locally-occurring materials. Straw bales are used to create a home’s walls inside of a frame, replacing other building materials such as concrete, wood, gypsum, plaster, fiberglass, or stone. When properly sealed, straw bales naturally provide very high levels of insulation for a hot or cold climate, and are not only affordable but sustainable as straw is a rapidly renewable resource. ®Flickr/Willie Angus 2. Grasscrete As its name might indicate, grasscrete is a method of laying concrete flooring, walkways, sidewalks, and driveways in such a manner that there are open patterns allowing grass or other flora to grow. While this provides the benefit of reducing concrete usage overall, there’s also another important perk — improved stormwater absorption and drainage. 3. Rammed Earth What’s more natural than the dirt under your feet? In fact, walls that have a similar feel to concrete can actually be created with nothing more than dirt tamped down very tightly in wooden forms. Rammed earth is a technology that has been used by human civilization for thousands of years, and can last a very long time. Modern rammed earth buildings can be made safer by use of rebar or bamboo, and mechanical tampers reduce the amount of labor required to create sturdy walls. 4. HempCrete HempCrete is just what it sounds like – a concrete like material created from the woody inner fibers of the hemp plant. The hemp fibers are bound with lime to create concrete-like shapes that are strong and light.  HempCrete blocks are super-lightweight, which can also dramatically reduce the energy used to transport the blocks, and hemp itself is a fast-growing, renewable resource. ®Flickr/Carolina Zuluaga 5. Bamboo Bamboo might seem trendy, but it has actually been a locally-sourced building material in some regions of the world for millennia. What makes bamboo such a promising building material for modern buildings is its combination of tensile strength , light weight, and fast-growing renewable nature. Used for framing buildings and shelters, bamboo can replace expensive and heavy imported materials and provide an alternative to concrete and rebar construction, especially in difficult-to reach areas, post-disaster rebuilding, and low-income areas with access to natural locally-sourced bamboo. 6. Recycled Plastic Instead of mining, extracting, and milling new components, researchers are creating concrete that includes ground up recycled plastics and trash, which not only reduces greenhouse gas emissions, but reduces weight and provides a new use for landfill-clogging plastic waste. 7. Wood Plain old wood still retains many advantages over more industrial building materials like concrete or steel. Not only do trees absorb CO2 as they grow, they require much less energy-intensive methods to process into construction products. Properly managed forests are also renewable and can ensure a biodiverse habitat. RELATED: Energy efficient timber cabin in Norway 8. Mycelium Mycelium is a crazy futuristic building material that’s actually totally natural – it comprises the root structure of fungi and mushrooms. Mycelium can be encouraged to grow around a composite of other natural materials, like ground up straw, in molds or forms, then air-dried to create lightweight and strong bricks or other shapes. ®Flickr/Zack Detailer 9. Ferrock Ferrock is a new material being researched that uses recycled materials including steel dust from the steel industry to create a concrete-like building material that is even stronger than concrete . What’s more, this unique material actually absorbs and traps carbon dioxide as part of its drying and hardening process – making it not only less CO2 intensive than traditional concrete, but actually carbon neutral. ®Flickr/Alan Stark 10. AshCrete AshCrete is a concrete alternative that uses fly ash instead of traditional cement.  By using fly ash, a by-product of burning coal, 97 percent of traditional components in concrete can be replaced with recycled material. ®Public Domain Pictures 11. Timbercrete Timbercrete is an interesting building material made of sawdust and concrete mixed together. Since it is lighter than concrete, it reduces transportation emissions, and the sawdust both reuses a waste product and replaces some of the energy-intensive components of traditional concrete. Timbercrete can be formed into traditional shapes such as blocks, bricks, and pavers.

Read the original: 
11 green building materials that are way better than concrete

IKEA eyes mushroom packaging to replace nasty polystyrene

March 2, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on IKEA eyes mushroom packaging to replace nasty polystyrene

Polystyrene is out and mushrooms are in. IKEA recently announced they will be moving away from the foam and are looking at a more sustainable option made from mushroom fibers. Designed by New York company Ecovative , Mushroom® Packaging is made using mycelium, which functions similar to the roots of a plant. Mycelium fastens the fungus to the ground and absorbs nutrients. Read the rest of IKEA eyes mushroom packaging to replace nasty polystyrene

Continued here:
IKEA eyes mushroom packaging to replace nasty polystyrene

Wind tower amplifies the howls and whistles of the coastal breeze

March 2, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Wind tower amplifies the howls and whistles of the coastal breeze

Read the rest of Wind tower amplifies the howls and whistles of the coastal breeze

The rest is here:
Wind tower amplifies the howls and whistles of the coastal breeze

Pollution-free furniture of the future will be grown from mushrooms

January 4, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Pollution-free furniture of the future will be grown from mushrooms

Read the rest of Pollution-free furniture of the future will be grown from mushrooms

Original post:
Pollution-free furniture of the future will be grown from mushrooms

These Elegant Cascade Pendant Lights are Actually Made From Mushrooms

November 14, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on These Elegant Cascade Pendant Lights are Actually Made From Mushrooms

You might not believe it at first glance, but the elegant pendant lights you see above are not made in a factory – they’re grown from living mushrooms ! Inhabitat favorite Danielle Trofe has developed a process for creating organic, biodegradable designs from mushroom mycelium – and she recently launched a new Cascade pendant light fitted with brass hardware that looks beautiful when hung solo or strung up in groups. If you’d like to pick one up, head on down to the Made in Brooklyn Holiday Market on November 22-23 from 10am to 6pm! + Danielle Trofe The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: danielle trofe , danielle trofe design , green design , green lamp , green lighting , living furniture , Mush-Lume , mushlume lamp , mushroom , Mushroom Lamp , mushroom lights , mushroom mycelium lights , mushrooms , mycelium , sustainable design

Go here to see the original:
These Elegant Cascade Pendant Lights are Actually Made From Mushrooms

This Mushroom Drone Will Biodegrade if it Crash Lands

November 14, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This Mushroom Drone Will Biodegrade if it Crash Lands

What happens to a drone when it crash lands? Besides polluting or damaging a potentially sensitive environment, it could also mean, at least for the military, that people you are spying on will know, well, that you are spying. Enter this clever bio-drone made out of a fungal material so that it simply degrades into an inconspicuous smudge when it makes a crash landing. Read the rest of This Mushroom Drone Will Biodegrade if it Crash Lands Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bio drone , biodegradable drone , crash landing drone , drone crash , drone technology , e.coli drone , mushroom , mushroom biodegradable drone , mushroom building , mushroom drone , mycelium , mycelium drone

Here is the original post:
This Mushroom Drone Will Biodegrade if it Crash Lands

INTERVIEW: Architect David Benjamin on Building The World’s First Mushroom Tower at PS1

August 6, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on INTERVIEW: Architect David Benjamin on Building The World’s First Mushroom Tower at PS1

<br /> <A HREF=”http://ad.doubleclick.net/jump/N3643.145749.INHABITAT/B8123027.108788360;sz=1×1;ord=[timestamp]?”><br /> <IMG SRC=”http://ad.doubleclick.net/ad/N3643.145749.INHABITAT/B8123027.108788360;sz=1×1;ord=[timestamp]?” BORDER=0 WIDTH=1 HEIGHT=1 ALT=”Advertisement”></A><br /> You may have heard the riddle about mushrooms being the only rooms with no walls, but David Benjamin is flipping the script on the old joke with some incredible mycotecture built from mushroom bricks! The architect and his firm, The Living , are pushing the boundaries of design by experimenting with biotecture, blurring the lines between biology and built environments. Their latest efforts have culminated in the world’s first tower made from fungus , which debuted at MoMA PS1 in Queens, New York last week. We recently had the chance to pick Benjamin’s brain about the future of mycotecture (mushroom architecture) , the benefits of biological buildings and what inspired this innovative new Hy-Fi tower in Queens. Read on to see what the biotect, innovator and director of the “Living Architecture Lab” at GSAPP has to say. Read the rest of INTERVIEW: Architect David Benjamin on Building The World’s First Mushroom Tower at PS1 Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: biotecture , buildings made of mushrooms , David Benjamin , eco design , fungus bricks , fungus tower , green design , inhabitat , inhabitat interview , innovative architecture , living architecture 3:47 ecovative , MoMA PS1 , moma ps1 mushroom building , mushroom brick , mushroom bricks , mushroom buildings , mushroom tower , mycelium , mycelium bricks , mycotecture , PS1 , sustainable design , the living

The rest is here:
INTERVIEW: Architect David Benjamin on Building The World’s First Mushroom Tower at PS1

Jonas Edvard’s Biodegradable Myx Lamp Grows Edible Oyster Mushrooms

October 23, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Jonas Edvard’s Biodegradable Myx Lamp Grows Edible Oyster Mushrooms

Designer Jonas Edvard just shared with Inhabitat his new Myx Lamp , which is made entirely from plant fibers and mushroom mycelium . The lamps are grown over a period of two weeks as fungi eat a substrate of plant fibers and produce a flexible and soft living textile. The production of each lamp generates 500-600 grams of Oyster mushrooms, and after harvesting the fungi the mycelium base serves as a dry and lightweight lampshade that is organic, compostable and sustainable. The result is an optimized end-waste product that doubles as a nutritious source of food! + Jonas Edvard The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: biodegradable lamp , eco interiors , green design , green interiors , green lighting , Jonas Edvard , living lamp , Mushroom Lamp , mushroom mycelium , mycelium , mycelium lamp , Myx Lamp , sustainable design        

View post: 
Jonas Edvard’s Biodegradable Myx Lamp Grows Edible Oyster Mushrooms

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 4494 access attempts in the last 7 days.