Former concrete factory is reborn as a unique music-inspired high school in Denmark

February 26, 2019 by  
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Dutch architecture firm MVRDV and Denmark-based COBE Architects have just finished construction on the Roskilde Festival Folk High School, an unconventional school built inside a former concrete factory in Roskilde’s Musicon creative district just outside Copenhagen. Created to further the “lifelong learning” values of the world-famous Roskilde Music Festival that takes place every year in the small town, the high school follows an immersive and “non-formal adult education” championed by the Danish system of folk high schools and is the first purpose-built school of its kind in Denmark in 50 years. The Roskilde Festival Folk High School marks the final phase of the 11,000-square-meter ROCKmagneten masterplan, also designed by MVRDV and COBE, and includes the school — set inside a former concrete factory — two new modular blocks of student housing, a building for staff housing and a series of adaptable shipping container-based structures that will host an ever-changing group of innovative startups, many related to the music and youth culture. To complement Musicon’s creative character, the buildings are fitted with playful geometric shapes and vibrant colors along with different materials inspired by the music festival. “Our design, just like the school itself, was inspired by the spirit of the Roskilde Festival . It is all about music, art, activism — but most of all, freedom,” says Jacob van Rijs, principal and co-founder of MVRDV. “The Roskilde festival combines ‘having a good time’ with innovation in an informal way, giving a special vibe that we wanted to capture in the design of the interior of the school.” Related: COBE Architects to transform Copenhagen’s Paper Island into a bustling cultural hub For the school, the architects used a “box-within-a-box” concept to divide the factory’s large industrial space into smaller usable spaces. The colorful modules can be used for a variety of programming including a 150-seat auditorium  — named the Orange Stage after the main stage of the Festival — a music studio, a workshop, and classrooms for dance, art and architecture. The recently completed school and housing joins the rock museum Ragnarock, completed in 2016, that’s wrapped in a striking facade of gold-colored aluminum in an expression of youth culture. + MVRDV + COBE Architects Images by Rasmus Hjortshøj – COAST and Ossip van Duivenbode

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Former concrete factory is reborn as a unique music-inspired high school in Denmark

MVRDV designs solar-powered KoolKiel with Jenga-like architecture in Germany

January 30, 2019 by  
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Dutch architecture firm MVRDV has unveiled plans to redevelop a post-industrial city block in Kiel, Germany, into an eye-catching, mixed-use complex that matches the creative spirit of the site’s current tenants. Dubbed “KoolKiel,” the 65,000-square-meter redevelopment project will include the adaptive reuse of the existing single-story W8 Medienzentrum building as well as the addition of a new zig-zagging plinth, office tower and hotel tower. The buildings will also be equipped with rooftop solar panels, rainwater catchment systems, green roofs and other energy-efficient features. Located near the southernmost tip of the Kiel Fjord, the project site is currently home to W8 Medienzentrum, a large, single-story building that was originally used for storing chains for ships and has been converted into an office space housing mostly companies in media and the creative industries. Inspired by the influence of these tenants on the area’s “unique and charismatic” identity, MVRDV has drawn inspiration from the existing community of companies for the KoolKiel design. The proposal will remake W8 Medienzentrum’s existing structure into a mix of commercial units with apartments above, while the new buildings will offer additional office space, a 250-room hotel, more residences, retail and a public event space. Dynamic exterior spaces — from a public courtyard with street furniture to a rooftop park — will connect the various buildings. Creative community input will be key to the project. For instance, the facade, made from fiber reinforced concrete panels, will display icons inspired by creative local businesses and individuals. The flexible design system also gives the community the choice to change many of the interior and exterior elements of the buildings, from the number of cantilevered units on the hotel tower to the size and layout of apartments stacked above the existing W8 building. Related: MVRDV proposes a glowing “Times Square Taiwan” with interactive media facades “In a location with such a dynamic and creative existing community, it’s obvious that the community should have a say in this development,” said Jacob van Rijs, principal and cofounder of MVRDV. “KoolKiel is not only inspired by them, but it also allows them to tailor the proposal to their wishes — we’re presenting them with not just a design, but also a question: ‘how “Kool” do you want it?’” + MVRDV Images via MVRDV

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MVRDV proposes a glowing Times Square Taiwan with interactive media facades

January 11, 2019 by  
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Prolific Dutch architecture firm MVRDV has unveiled a bold proposal to transform Taipei’s Main Station into a “Times Square for Taiwan.” Designed as part of a consortium led by Nan Hai Development, the Taipei Twin Towers aim to reactivate the area with two high-rises clad in interactive media facades. The mixed-use project would offer new retail, office space, two cinemas and two hotels, in addition to the unification and redevelopment of the existing plazas. Located on the east side of the city, Taipei Main Station is currently ensnared in an aging concrete jungle and offers an arrival sequence — the transportation hub includes access to inter- and intra-city buses, metro and the airport railway — that MVRDV principal and co-founder Winy Maas has described as an “anti-climax.” To revitalize the area as a tourist and shopping destination, the architects have proposed stacking a mix of small and large blocks together into “vertical village” skyscrapers. The smaller blocks, located near the bottom, would house different retail outlets while the larger blocks above would contain the offices, cinemas and two hotels. The blocks will be strategically stacked to not only create public atriums  but to also allow for natural ventilation. Landscaped terraces will be located on the top of the retail blocks and connected via escalators and elevated walkways. Some blocks would also be covered with interactive media displays that can be programmed to show major cultural spectacles, sporting events or advertising for the retail tenants. Related: Shimmering bamboo-shaped skyscraper to rise in Taipei “The Taipei Twin Towers will turn this area into the downtown that Taipei deserves, with its vibrant mixture of activities matched only by the vibrant collection of facade treatments on the stacked neighborhood above,” Winy Maas explained. “We break down the required program into pleasant small blocks that echo the surrounding urban quarters, thus fitting the density fit into its surroundings. People can climb over the blocks to the top — a true vertical village . And the space in between allows for social gatherings and natural ventilation.” + MVRDV Images via MVRDV

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MVRDV proposes a glowing Times Square Taiwan with interactive media facades

MVRDV completes massive, mountain-like vertical village for 5,000 residents in India

December 10, 2018 by  
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A mountain-like residential development has risen in Pune  — India’s eighth largest city and one of the fastest-growing cities in the country — and brought with it 1,068 apartments to house approximately 5,000 people in a single building. Completed as MVRDV’s first project in India, the Future Towers bucks the local standard for cookie-cutter freestanding buildings in favor of a singular mountainous structure with peaks and valleys. The mixture of unit types is meant to encourage interaction among the diverse residents who come from different backgrounds and income levels while keeping housing prices competitively low. Created as part of Amanora Park Town on the outskirts of Pune, Future Towers consists of apartments that range from 45 square meters to 450 square meters. Despite its striking mountain-like appearance, the design of the enormous building was mainly informed by research into Indian housing standards and cultural expectations. For instance, the building floor plans incorporate the principles of Vastu Shastra, a traditional system of architecture that has been likened to Feng Shui. The natural ventilation system that helps extract air from kitchens and aids in natural cooling found in typical housing developments has also been used in Future Towers. “In Asia, cities are growing so fast, and uniform repetitive residential towers are the norm,” said Jacob van Rijs, principal and co-founder of MVRDV. “With our design, we are making an effort to offer more variety and bring people from more different backgrounds together. In the original master plan, 16 separate towers were planned, all of which would have more or less the same type of apartments. The MVRDV team thoroughly researched modern Indian housing and came up with a system to create a mix of different types of apartment inside one building. This project will attract residents with a variety of incomes, something that will benefit the diversity of Amanora Park Town. Thanks to the client’s willingness to try something new, the efficiency needed for mass housing has been achieved without cutting back on residents’ comfort.” Related: Striking Heritage School with stone walls and curved roofs mimics the rolling green hills of India Since construction costs are low in India, but elevators are comparatively expensive, Future Towers comprises just four circulation cores around which the nine wings — each ranging from 17 to 30 stories — are clustered. Large social spaces, known as ‘scoops,’ are scattered throughout the building and are designed for different activities or purposes, such as mini golf or child care. Each one is brightly painted to create a sense of a “neighborhood identity” in different parts of the building. Outdoor courtyards accessed via four-story-tall triangular gates provide additional gathering space. + MVRDV Photography by © Ossip van Duivenbode via MVRDV

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MVRDV completes massive, mountain-like vertical village for 5,000 residents in India

MVRDV redesign of Europes largest urban shopping center breaks ground in France

March 14, 2018 by  
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Construction has kicked off on Lyon Part-Dieu, MVRDV’s competition-winning design for Europe’s largest downtown shopping center that promises much more than retail therapy. Conceived as an antidote to the existing mall’s car-centered design, the new shopping center will emphasize the public realm with a human scale and pedestrian friendly experience. The mall will be integrated into the urban fabric and bring in greenery with landscaped areas from the ground floor to the public green roof. Founded in 1975 in the 3rd arrondissement of Lyon , the 166,000-square-meter Lyon Part-Dieu shopping center is now undergoing a contemporary makeover. “Lyon Part-Dieu, we draw this facade with big pixels which we hope will give a more human scale not just to the mall, but the whole site,” says Winy Maas, MVRDV co-founder. “In 2020, Lyon Part-Dieu will be both a place for everyday life and shopping, but also culture and relaxation in a reinvented setting.’’ The most eye-catching element of the redesign is the “ pixelated ” facade where the facade subtly transitions from concrete to glass to open the interior up to the outdoors. The concrete facade will also be covered in “depolluting coating” to improve outdoor air quality . Related: MVRDV unveils solar-powered Milestone building that looks like a crystal rock While retail will reign king at Lyon Part-Dieu, the new mall also offers plenty for the non-shopper including restaurants, cinema, and public parks. Big outdoor stairwells and escalators provide access to the public green roof and park. The project is slated for completion in 2020 and the buildings will remain open during construction. + MVRDV Images via MVRDV

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MVRDV redesign of Europes largest urban shopping center breaks ground in France

Tree-topped bridge to double as public space for a historic Chinese town

February 8, 2018 by  
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MVRDV has won a competition for Dawn Bridge, a new multi-use bridge near Shanghai that will give locals and visitors the chance to experience a historic Chinese water town in a whole new way. Located near the famous water town Zhujiajiao, this new 80-meter-long landmark will be topped with trees and amphitheater-like seating that overlooks views of the water and riverside architecture. To blend the modern bridge into its surroundings, the architects drew a contextual palette of colors and materials referencing the local vernacular. Located between the 16th century Fangsheng Bridge and the Qingpu Road Bridge, the 24-meter-wide Dawn Bridge will mark a new era of development in the riverfront area. MVRDV’s winning design proposes a bridge that doubles as public space by turning part of the deck into amphitheater -like seating optimized for gatherings, meetings, and beautiful views of Zhujiajiao. The bridge also provides sufficient clearance to the approximately 80-meter-wide active riverbed that’s used for activities year-round. “The vertical alignment of Dawn Bridge defines a sense of lightness and elegance, and our aim was to provide a graceful low curve above the river that also blends with the landscape”, says Wenchian Shi, Partner at MVRDV. “Beyond blending, we wanted to create a bridge that invites public life over and around it and that is accessible to all people whether on foot or on wheels.” Related: World’s first 3D-printed bridge opens in the Netherlands The bridge’s pedestrian deck and landings will be painted in the same reddish hue as the wood found in the nearby houses, while the gray roofs and white walls of the local residences are echoed in the bridge’s white structural frame and gray asphalt. Proposed plantings and trees on the bridge mimic the greenery of the riverbanks . Completion is anticipated for 2019. + MVRDV Images via MVRDV

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Tree-topped bridge to double as public space for a historic Chinese town

HASSELL and MVRDV tackle climate change in the Bay Area

January 31, 2018 by  
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A HASSELL -led design team that includes MVRDV has unveiled their preliminary proposed design strategy for tackling climate change in the San Francisco Bay Area as part of the yearlong Resilient by Design research challenge. The design team collected research by collaborating with local residents, design firms, experts, and public officials. Their findings identify existing areas of weakness in South San Francisco and potential design solutions for San Mateo County; the team will further develop the proposed strategy that will be presented in May. Modeled after the successful Rebuild by Design challenge, Resilient by Design asked designers around the world to develop community-based solutions that would protect the San Francisco Bay Area from sea level rise , severe storms, flooding, and earthquakes. Ten winning design teams were selected to embark on the yearlong research and design challenge, among them the HASSELL-led team that includes MVRDV, Deltares, Goudappel, Lotus Water, Civic Edge, Idyllist, Hatch, and Page & Turnbull. “ Climate change is real, by the end of the century there will be a sea level rise of 2 meters. Bay Area communities respond to this challenge in a multi-disciplinary approach to upgrade their general resilience,” said Nathalie de Vries, MVRDV co-founder. “We developed a flexible toolbox for San Mateo which helps the local community by revitalising public spaces that collect and connect people and water.” Related: Resilient infrastructure proposal aims to protect San Francisco Bay from rising sea levels Their recently released renderings and diagrams offer proposals for reconnecting San Francisco communities to the waterfront and for protecting the land from climate challenges. The team drew on historic precedent, such as responses to the devastating 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and observations of the recent Northern California wildfires. “The team now has the opportunity to apply its ‘collect and connect’ toolkit to proposed sites in South San Francisco,” wrote the design team, referring to the way streets and creeks are rethought of as connectors from a water management standpoint, while adaptive open spaces serve as collectors for everyday gathering, big events, and disaster assembly. “At Colma Creek, HASSELL has imagined a new Shoreline Park. Meanwhile, Grand Avenue will become a vital community hub with a drop-in storefront people can visit during the design phase. The team’s design process will draw heavily on local voices and insights to ensure that design solutions – which will be presented in May – reflect the community’s needs. In addition to the drop-in centre, city residents will be able to access a digital platform to learn about adapting for resilience and get involved in decision making.” + HASSELL + MVRDV Images via MVRDV

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HASSELL and MVRDV tackle climate change in the Bay Area

MVRDV unveils solar-powered Milestone building that looks like a crystal rock

January 31, 2018 by  
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MVRDV just unveiled designs for a new mixed-use building in Esslingen, Germany that looks as if it were unearthed from a crystal mine. Dubbed The Milestone, the 6,500-square-meter tower “will literally be a milestone,” say the architects, due to the structure’s crystalline facade that and eye-catching design that symbolizes the city’s future ambition. The building also incorporates sustainable building elements, such as photovoltaic panels and fritted glass to reduce solar gain, and is expected to become partly self-sufficient in the future. Located in Stuttgart in the south of Germany , Esslingen boasts a robust historic core as well as a number of recent regeneration projects in the area of “Neue Weststadt” around the main railway station. The Milestone was commissioned to draw attention to the town and its ambitious projects in the center of the newly developed district that will accommodate a university, housing, and retail. “MVRDV’s ambition is to generate a building that shows the city of Esslingen and at the same time, opens up to its surrounding and its users,” write the architects. “To the people who pass by on the train, and to those that look at the city from the hills ‘Here We Are.’ It shows its pride, its history and its future.” Related: China’s new futuristic library is unlike any we’ve seen before The Milestone’s part-mirrored, part-transparent facade will feature an interactive surface that communicates the area’s topography and history. Each square “pixel” panel on the facade is embedded with technology and integrated QR codes to show stories of the city and users will be able to learn more through an accompanying smartphone app. The large gap in the pixelated facade, called the “Essingler Room,” is for public use and made up of stairs, terraces and platforms that provide views of vineyards and surrounding hills. Public amenities will include a restaurant cafe and meeting areas, while the upper levels are occupied by modern office spaces. Construction is slated to begin in 2020. + MVRDV Images via MVRDV

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MVRDV unveils solar-powered Milestone building that looks like a crystal rock

German slang wraps around MVRDV-designed building for Munich

November 23, 2017 by  
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German architecture takes a playful turn in WERK12, a mixed-use building designed by MVRDV that’s just broke ground in Munich . Located in a post-industrial site in the emerging Werksviertel neighborhood, WERK12 draws inspiration from its industrial heritage and modern graffiti culture. To set the mood for the stylish spaces within, MVRDV teamed up with artists Engelmann and Engl to wrap the building in 5-meter-tall German slang lettering that light up at night. Located near Munich’s East Station, the 9,600-square-meter WERK12 was commissioned by OTEC GmbH & Co. KG as part of a 40-hectare urban regeneration masterplan that will create approximately 1,200 new homes and up to 7,000 new jobs. The mixed-use building will comprise loft-style offices, restaurants, sports facilities, a skyline swimming pool, and restaurants for nightlife and gastronomy. The façade’s use of giant German words, found in various youth and subculture groups, as public signage is a nod to the graffiti culture and extensive use of signage found around the area. “WERK12 is totally unique and entirely new for Munich and is a strong contrast to the historic centre just ten minutes away”, says Jacob van Rijs, MVRDV co-founder. “It is a flexible and completely user adaptable building with spaces that can transform over time with bold and expressive texts on the façade are visible from a distance. This transparent building becomes a new focal point on the new Plaza that will form the heart of the Werksviertel.” Related: China’s new futuristic library is unlike any we’ve seen before The five-floor building will be optimized for natural daylight and feature tall ceilings and airy, open spaces flexible enough for multiple uses. The high ceilings, all over 5 meter in height, allows for split levels to break up the space and add visual interest. MVRDV pushed the elevator shaft and fire escape stairs to the outside of the building to create the deep and flexible interiors, while turning the outdoor stairways into a focal point punctuated by 3.25-meter-wide terraces . WERK12 is slated for completion in February 2019. + MVRDV

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German slang wraps around MVRDV-designed building for Munich

Recycled bedsprings transformed into an art pavilion at Dubai Design Week

November 23, 2017 by  
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Old copper bedsprings have been transformed into a surprisingly chic exhibition space at this year’s Dubai Design Week. Fahed + Architects designed Pavilion Abwab (“doors” in Arabic) to house a curated selection of 47 designs by design talent from the Middle East, North Africa, and South Asia (MENASA). The cloud of mesh metal made of locally sourced materials takes inspiration from nature and showcases the firm’s commitment to environmentally friendly practices. The temporary Abwab pavilion consolidates all the designs into a single space, unlike Dubai Design Week’s former practice of commissioning independent pavilions for six MENASA countries. Designers from 15 different MENASA countries were represented this year at the exhibition that was split into eight categories: interpretation, mimicry, intersection, geometry, tactility, artisanal, nostalgia, and re-use . Related: Beautiful timber pavilion unfolds like origami Fahed + Architects sourced the used bedsprings from local waste management company bee’ah . A series of interconnected posts supported the cloud of mesh. “Set against a large mass of buildings within the d3 corridors, the structure’s silhouette will be reminiscent of impetuous ocean waves, coral clusters in a reef and clouds in the sky, referencing the practice’s environmental commitment,” reads a statement on Dubai Design Week . “The pavilion will distill daylight to create patterns on the exhibited works and on the ground.” + Fahed + Architects Via Dezeen Images by Photo Solutions

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Recycled bedsprings transformed into an art pavilion at Dubai Design Week

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