A greenhouse is transformed into an experimental living space in Taiwan

September 26, 2018 by  
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Taipei-based design practice BIAS Architects recently completed “Greenhouse as a Home,” an experimental installation that reinterprets the living areas of a traditional house as five climatic zones. Created for the 2018 Taoyuan Green Expo, the project invited the public to experience the buildings with all five senses, from feeling the climatic differences to eating fresh vegetables hydroponically grown in the installation. Greenhouse as a Home consists of five independent yet interconnected steel grid structures with varying heights and climates ranging from 16 to 29 degrees Celsius (61 to 84 degrees Fahrenheit). Greenhouse as a Home was developed to promote a “culture of sustainability” with its interactive programmatic zones conducive to education. “Here, the human living space is intertwined with that of the plants and organized according to climatic zones, rather than traditional architectural areas,” the architects explained. “ Greenhouses building materials and structures are arranged to separate climatic areas, while the distribution of water and energy flows is technologically managed. The roof is covered with various combinations of agricultural gauzes and plastic films to control lighting and solar radiation.” The experimental project is divided into five structures: the Fern Living Room, Farm Dining, Photosynthesis Kitchen, Sun Garden and Theater of Mushroom. A defined walking path links the different volumes. The first zone visitors experience is the Fern Living Room, a shadowy and humid space dressed with potted ferns hung from the ceiling. The next room, Farm Dining, is slightly hotter and less humid and serves as the main activity zone organized around a large table. Related: 6 places where soil-less farming is revolutionizing how we grow food A vertical hydroponic farm is located in the Photosynthesis Kitchen, the middle zone where fresh vegetables are picked daily and cooked in the demonstration kitchen. The fourth zone, the Sun Garden, is the hottest and driest room of all and is used to desiccate vegetables. The fifth and final zone, the Theater of Mushroom, immerses visitors into a dark, highly humid environment with the coolest temperatures in the entire installation; the multisensory space is complemented by light and sound performances. + BIAS Architects Images by Rockburger

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A greenhouse is transformed into an experimental living space in Taiwan

Food-starved Syrians are switching meat for mushrooms

August 10, 2017 by  
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Mushrooms are not a common crop in Syria . With government blockades creating food shortages, however, Syrians in embattled rebel strongholds like Douma are increasingly turning to mushrooms as a substitute for meat. As years of drawn-out sieges place meat and other staples of Syrian cuisine beyond most people’s reach, The Adala Foundation, a local nonprofit, began brainstorming alternatives. “We turned to cultivating mushrooms because they’re a food that has high nutritional value, similar to meat, and can be grown inside houses and basements,” Abu Nabil, an engineer who is project director of the group, told AFP . Mushrooms have proven to be a good source of protein and mineral salts, according to Muayad Mohieddin, Adala’s director. In addition, mushroom farming requires neither copious space nor deep pockets. Related: These amazing zero-waste buildings were grown from mushrooms There was just one problem: “This type of cultivation was totally unknown in Ghouta before the war,” said Mohieddin. Growing bags of mushrooms in a climate-controlled room known as the incubator, Adala has managed to distribute 1,300 kilograms (2,866 pounds) of mushrooms a week to 500 people across Douma and other parts of Eastern Ghota at no cost. “The distribution is free for the poorest families, and for those suffering malnutrition or spinal cord injuries that need lots of nutrients,” Abu Nabil said. Many of the project’s recipients were unfamiliar with mushrooms and had never eaten them before. One psychosocial center organized a workshop to teach people how to cook with mushrooms. Others turned to the Internet for tips. “On the first day, I fried them up with some onions, and on the second day I cooked them in a yoghurt sauce,” said Abu Adnan al-Sidawi, who received mushrooms through Adala. “Mushrooms are delicious cooked and we liked them in the yogurt sauce.” Via AFP Photos by Harshal Hirve and Jade Wulfraat on Unsplash

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Food-starved Syrians are switching meat for mushrooms

These amazing zero-waste buildings were grown from mushrooms

June 27, 2017 by  
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Could the buildings of the future be grown instead of built? Brunel University student Aleksi Vesaluoma has found a way to grow living structures using mushroom mycelium . Vesaluoma worked with architecture firm Astudio to create these Grown Structures, which offer a waste-free , organic alternative to conventional construction materials When mycelium grows on organic materials such as straw, it binds the matter together like glue. Aleksi Vesaluoma and Astudio mixed oyster mushroom mycelium with cardboard and poured the material into tube-shaped cotton bandages. These tubular forms were then placed inside a ventilated greenhouse for four weeks to grow and strengthen. This process turns organic waste into nutrients for the growth of the mycelium – and it’s completely waste-free, since the structure is 100% biodegradable. Related: 3D-Printed Mycelium Chair Sprouts Living Mushrooms! Grown Structures have prompted several attempts at commercialization in the USA and the Netherlands. The fact that the fungi which grow on the structures can also be eaten makes the project perfect for pop-up restaurants . + Brunel University London + Astudio Via Dezeen

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These amazing zero-waste buildings were grown from mushrooms

Mushroom burial suit turns dead bodies into compost

August 14, 2016 by  
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Designer Jae Rhim Lee believes there’s a better way to be buried. Not in a coffin in your finest clothes, but rather with a mushroom burial suit that can turn your dead body into clean compost. Lee’s eco-friendly garment, called the Infinity Burial Suit , relies on two different kinds of mushrooms that break down the toxins in the body and helps speed up the natural decomposition process.

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Mushroom burial suit turns dead bodies into compost

HOW TO: Grow your own mushrooms from recycled cardboard and coffee grounds

November 3, 2015 by  
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Book lovers and coffee drinkers no doubt have an excess of cardboard and coffee grounds on their hands. But before you chuck them in the recycling bin, why not consider reusing those materials to grow mushrooms? It may sound strange at first, but nutrient-rich coffee grounds and corrugated cardboard are a match made in mushroom heaven. All you’ll need is a plastic container cleaned with rubbing alcohol and perforated with four to six quarter-inch holes; corrugated cardboard that’s been soaked in water for at least one to two days; quality mushroom spawn that can be found online; and spent coffee grounds, ideally from the day-of. Starting with the cardboard, layer the materials in the container like you would lasagna and cover each sprinkle of spawn with coffee grounds. Then, watch the magic happen! + A Piece of Rainbow The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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HOW TO: Grow your own mushrooms from recycled cardboard and coffee grounds

These Elegant Cascade Pendant Lights are Actually Made From Mushrooms

November 14, 2014 by  
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You might not believe it at first glance, but the elegant pendant lights you see above are not made in a factory – they’re grown from living mushrooms ! Inhabitat favorite Danielle Trofe has developed a process for creating organic, biodegradable designs from mushroom mycelium – and she recently launched a new Cascade pendant light fitted with brass hardware that looks beautiful when hung solo or strung up in groups. If you’d like to pick one up, head on down to the Made in Brooklyn Holiday Market on November 22-23 from 10am to 6pm! + Danielle Trofe The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: danielle trofe , danielle trofe design , green design , green lamp , green lighting , living furniture , Mush-Lume , mushlume lamp , mushroom , Mushroom Lamp , mushroom lights , mushroom mycelium lights , mushrooms , mycelium , sustainable design

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These Elegant Cascade Pendant Lights are Actually Made From Mushrooms

The Future of Plastic: A “Growing Lab Art” Exhibit that Uses Fungi as a Building and Binding Material

June 18, 2014 by  
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Artist Maurizio Montalti will be exhiting his Future of Plastic exhibit next month at the Fondazione PLART in Napoli, Italy. His exhibit embodies a vision of what plastics are going to look like in the future, and one of the main components he uses is fungi. He follows the evolution of “cultivated” objects by introducing fungal organisms (mushrooms!) to materials like fiberd or agricultural waste. The fungi evolves into an intricate network of mycelium filaments, creating a binding material that holds the building agents together, creating a completely new object. This process could be compared to slow 3D printing in which the speed of printing corresponds to the fungi’s natural growing speed. Where: Fondazione PLART, Via G. Martucci 48, 80121 Napoli (IT), www.fondazioneplart.it When:  Official opening on Thursday, July 10th, 2014, at 6 pm; Runs to 27 September, 2014. Tuesday to Friday 10 AM – 6 PM, Saturday 10 AM – 1 PM + The Future of Plastic + Fondazione PLART The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3D , 3d printed , 3D printing , Art , art exhibit , bowl , bowls , Fondazione plart , fungi , fungi plastic , fungus , future of plastic , future plastic , Maurizio Montalti , mushroom , mushroom plastic , mushroom plastics , mushrooms , Plart , plastic

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The Future of Plastic: A “Growing Lab Art” Exhibit that Uses Fungi as a Building and Binding Material

The Farmery is a Farm and Market in Four Recycled Shipping Containers in North Carolina

October 17, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of The Farmery is a Farm and Market in Four Recycled Shipping Containers in North Carolina Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , farmer’s market , green design , hydroponic growing systems , modular growing system , mushrooms , raleigh , Recycled Materials , shipping container , sustainable design , The Farmery , Urban Farming

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The Farmery is a Farm and Market in Four Recycled Shipping Containers in North Carolina

London’s Energy-Efficient Jodrell Laboratory Houses the World’s Largest Fungi Collection

November 4, 2011 by  
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Read the rest of London’s Energy-Efficient Jodrell Laboratory Houses the World’s Largest Fungi Collection Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architecture , Botanical , BREEAM excellent , brise soleil , cross-flow ventilation , Daylighting , energy efficient lighting , fungi , green interiors , green lighting , helix dna structure , kew gardens , London , mushrooms , natural light , skylight , timber , u-values , Wilkinson Eyre

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London’s Energy-Efficient Jodrell Laboratory Houses the World’s Largest Fungi Collection

Roasted Mushrooms with Miso-Ginger Butter

September 12, 2011 by  
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Photos by Sabrina Modelle of The Tomato Tart This recipe was created exclusively for Treehugger’s Green Wine Guide by The Tomato Tart . I first encountered roasted mushrooms with garlic, white wine, and butter. Of course, I fell in love with them instantly. This side, a variation of that dish, is perfect for when I feel like something rich and savory, yet quick to prepare. I decided to mix things up a bit with a miso-g… Read the full story on TreeHugger

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