Student discovers a way to destroy superbug bacteria without antibiotics

September 28, 2016 by  
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A 25-year-old student has discovered a way to destroy antibiotic-resistant bacteria without pummeling them with more antibiotics . Shu Lam successfully destroyed superbugs in lab tests using a star-shaped polymer that literally rips the cells to shreds. This breakthrough could signal a complete overhaul in how the medical community approaches these deadly bacteria . Currently, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ( MRSA ), kill 700,000 people per year. Scientists are worried that number could skyrocket to 10 million by the year 2050 , so they’re searching for ways to successful intervene before more damage is done. University of Melbourne student Shu Lam believes she may have found a solution. Related: ‘Nightmare’ bacteria found in the U.S. resists all known antibiotics Her study , published in Nature Microbiology , details the mechanism of SNAPPs, or structurally nanoengineered antimicrobial peptide polymers . SNAPPs work by directly targeting, attacking, and destabilizing the cell membranes of superbugs. They are large enough that they do not affect healthy cells, which are affected by conventional approaches that “poison” the bacteria. So far, Lam has successfully tested SNAPPs on six different strains of superbugs in a laboratory setting, and one in live mice. In each experiment, the nasty bacteria were all killed and did not develop resistance to the polymers in future generations. The development is still in its early phases, yet Lam and her team believe they are onto something big. Via Science Alert Images via Wikipedia , Flickr

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Student discovers a way to destroy superbug bacteria without antibiotics

Mesmerizing Abyss Horizon table recreates the oceans dramatic depths

September 28, 2016 by  
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Unlike Duffy London’s previous iterations, the Abyss Horizon is circular rather than rectangular. This table, in addition to being a striking conversation starter, is made to order and handcrafted by local artisans and in-house craftsmen. The layers of cut glass create the illusion of a bottomless sinkhole in the center of a table. The light-colored wood that surfaces at the top mimic islands and landforms with sandy white beaches and aquamarine waters. Related: Amazing Abyss Table Layers Glass and Wood to Mimic the Depths of the Ocean Blue The Abyss Horizon Table is limited to 25 editions and can be made and delivered within 12 to 14 weeks. Price is available upon request. “‘I was looking into sheets of thick glass at my glass manufacturer’s factory, and noticed how the material darkened as they added more layers – the same way the sea does as it deepens,” said Christopher Duffy about his inspiration behind the Abyss tables. “I wanted to use this effect to replicate a real piece of the earth’s sea bed. Like a mythical power had lifted a perfect rectangle straight from the earth’s crust to use as his personal ornament.” The Abyss Horizon is available to view through the Sarah Myerscough Gallery . + Duffy London Images via Duffy London

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Mesmerizing Abyss Horizon table recreates the oceans dramatic depths

This 1,000 year-old Anglo-Saxon potion can cure the terrifying MRSA superbug

April 1, 2015 by  
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Researchers at the University of Nottingham  have made an astonishing discovery that a 10th century Anglo-Saxon potion for curing styes  can also cure the brutal hospital superbug MRSA . While the ingredient list reads like a witch’s brew—cropleek, garlic, wine and oxgall—the resulting self-sterilizing concoction has performed surprisingly well in tests to treat MRSA, an antibiotic-resistant staph bacteria that is the scourge of hospitals. Read the rest of This 1,000 year-old Anglo-Saxon potion can cure the terrifying MRSA superbug Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: ancient medicine , antibiotic-resistent , bald’s leechbook , cures for MRSA , dr christina lee , how to fight MRSA , medieval medicine , the leechbook , unviersity of nottingham , viking studies

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This 1,000 year-old Anglo-Saxon potion can cure the terrifying MRSA superbug

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