Gorgeous, energy-efficient retreat rests among Utah’s mountains

November 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Danish interior designer Mette Axboe spent months searching for the perfect U.S. location for a family retreat, but the hunt came to an abrupt end once she set sights on an expansive lot of 10 pristine acres overlooking Utah’s picturesque Park City. The mountain range in the background inspired the stunning design, which was conceived as a “looking box” to enjoy the scenery from any point in the home. Axboe worked with architect Chris Price and his firm Park City Design + Build to develop the idyllic retreat for long getaways. Although the family was open to ideas about the overall design, they knew that the focus had to be on the surrounding landscape. “We wanted something that would fit our lifestyle and family, and cater to frequent (and long-staying) guests from overseas,” Axboe said. “We asked Chris to ‘architect it up’ — keeping our layout in mind, and ensuring a good fit with both the site and surrounding area. It was very important for us to design a house that fit the landscape and not the other way around.” Related: A historic farmhouse is transformed into a modern home with a green roof Accordingly, the rolling fields and mountain range in the distance became the focal point of the home’s design. The  low-lying horizontal volume  is tucked into the landscape to help blend the structure into its surroundings. To create a “looking box,” the team included sizable windows and multiple outdoor decks to provide stunning views from virtually any angle. To further blend the home into its environment, the architects and designer went with a muted color palette using a combination of natural cedar and board-formed concrete. These materials continue through the interior, where enormous sliding glass doors and windows provide a seamless connection between the indoor and outdoor spaces. An expansive deck with large comfy sofas, a dining table and fire pit is the perfect spot for soaking up the amazing scenery. In addition to bringing nature to the forefront of the design, the residents were also focused on creating an energy-efficient home . As such, the architects employed various Passive Haus standards . Triple-pane windows were installed to allow the home to have access to ample natural light and stunning views without massive heat loss. Radiant heat flooring also provides even temperature control during the freezing Utah winters. As for the interior living areas , Axboe used her native Danish roots to create a modern, Scandinavian-inspired design. The home’s all-white walls and light oak flooring open up the space, providing a welcoming atmosphere throughout. According to Axboe, “This is a family home, not a cold art museum.” + Park City Design + Build Via Dwell Photography by Renan Ozturk via Park City Design + Build

Go here to read the rest: 
Gorgeous, energy-efficient retreat rests among Utah’s mountains

Natural stone and an expansive green roof blend the stunning Gozu House into the Andes Mountains

August 30, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Natural stone and an expansive green roof blend the stunning Gozu House into the Andes Mountains

When it comes to creating a serene living space, Medellín-based firm Opus Studio put nature first in their design for the gorgeous Gozu House. Located in the small Colombian province of Antioquia, which sits in the Andes mountains, the home blends into its stunning natural environment with help from its natural stone cladding and expansive green roofs . Sitting at an altitude of 7,200 feet, the 5,000-square-foot family home sits nested into a lush, green valley within the Andes Mountain range. The structure is comprised of three main modules, topped with two undulating green roofs meeting at the center module. The home’s jagged silhouette is designed to mimic the the mountains in the background. Related: A striking timber home with a green roof disappears into a Mexican forest The Gozu House has a subtle presence thanks to its low, elongated volume, which, along with the natural pine wood and stone cladding , virtually camouflages the structure into its natural environment. The entrance of the home sits between the two “wings” of the design. Once inside, the entryway extends into a winding corridor that wraps around the interior, leading to the central living area and the exterior. Large glass panels and sliding doors provide a seamless connection with the outdoor space throughout the home’s layout. At the heart of the design is an open-air courtyard with a swimming pool surrounded by a large wooden deck –  a fun entertainment area for socializing. To create a home that was energy-efficient, the architects relied on a number of passive strategies. For instance, the main living space is oriented to the east to take advantage of the day’s sunlight while the bedrooms face the West to provide shade and privacy. Although the dual green roofs certainly play a part in connecting the home to its surroundings, they also provide an insulative thermal inertia for the living space, reducing the home’s energy needs. + Opus Studio Photography and video by Isaac Ramírez Marín via Opus Studio

Continued here: 
Natural stone and an expansive green roof blend the stunning Gozu House into the Andes Mountains

Historic Chinese granary is transformed into a chic mountain resort

August 27, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Historic Chinese granary is transformed into a chic mountain resort

A cluster of historic, rural Chinese buildings has been saved from the ravages of time by Shanghai-based architecture and interior design studio Ares Partners . The architects transformed six granary structures into the new MIYA | LOSTVILLA Huchen Barn Resort, an elegant and modern hotel tucked in the mountains of Ningbo’s Huchen township. Surrounded by stunning views, the sensitively restored architecture is complemented by modern furnishings and new buildings, covering a total site area of 5,430 square meters. Set between Tiantai Mountain and Siming Mountain, the old granary station was built in 1956. Five of the seven existing buildings were mainly built with stone masonry ; the lower part of the white-painted exterior featured rock stone, and the upper part was constructed with brick. The original buildings were fitted with very small windows located on the upper part of the facade. The remaining two buildings featured timber construction. The team’s goal was to preserve the architectural integrity as much as possible yet make the interiors more comfortable and inviting for human habitation. To that end, the architects stripped the white paint from the facade to reveal the beautiful stone masonry underneath and added large windows to let in more natural light and breathtaking views of the mountains. The structures were reinforced, and the utility pipes and conduits were hidden. Interior walls were inserted to create 21 guest suites. The architects also added a new building to house the reception and meeting facilities, and one of the former buildings from the 1970s was replaced with a new-build as well. Related: Schmidt Hammer Lassen wins bid to design new Ningbo Library in China “We believe the project is well accomplished to transform between two extreme opposite function spaces,” said the architects, who completed the project in 2017. “The architecture form of the new building is modern and abstract. The contemporary architecture language is yet to be respectful to the existing buildings around as well as to nature. Architecture, people and nature are in harmony.” + Ares Partners Images by Su Shengliang

View original post here:
Historic Chinese granary is transformed into a chic mountain resort

SAOTA’s Benguela Cove design takes rooms with a view seriously

July 27, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on SAOTA’s Benguela Cove design takes rooms with a view seriously

When you announce you’ve moved into a home on a cove, the first image that comes to mind is a house with glorious views. And on that front, this house from SAOTA Architecture and Design with interiors by ARRCC does not disappoint. Located within the Benguela Cove Lagoon Wine Estate in South Africa , this modern home affords spectacular vistas from nearly every room on all levels – even from the bathtub. Perched just above the seashore of Benguela Cove Wine Estate in the Overberg region of the Western Cape , the sprawling home looks out over the Botrivier Lagoon and Overberg Mountains. Every material, inside and out, pays homage to natural resources , accented with subdued materials including steel and corrugated aluminum. The cerulean skies and azure water of the cove make the timber exterior and aluminum roof pop against the deep green landscape. The bedroom wing on the first floor sits atop the home’s living areas; each room has a panoramic view of the cove and adjoining greenery. The bathtub in the master bathroom has a window with a clear view of the mountains and cove. The landing below overlooks a courtyard before you step inside the living quarters. Related: One in four of world’s largest cities under water stress Huge blocks of granite flank the kitchen island and contrast with the brilliantly polished countertop, making it the focal point of the room. The light wood cabinets soften the kitchen, which overlooks the flowing design of the lounge and dining areas. The sweeping views go on, as does the theme of wood slats on the ceiling and granite floors. Relaxation is the theme of the living room. A colossal concrete hearth wall surrounds the fireplace and oversized picture window, and finely crafted pre-weathered steel cloaks the flues. Al fresco dining and socializing take place in an outdoor dining and kitchen area with an inviting and spacious sun deck. A staircase with glass railing and a CNC-cut timber screen background adds yet another tactile touch to the décor. + ARRCC + SAOTA Architecture and Design Photography by Adam Letch

View original post here: 
SAOTA’s Benguela Cove design takes rooms with a view seriously

Take a break in this nautically inspired tiny pod on a Scottish island

July 24, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Take a break in this nautically inspired tiny pod on a Scottish island

Airbnb’s roster of unique lodgings has just added a new star to its lineup: this tiny pod retreat located on a remote Scottish island. Designed by Roderick James Architects , the submarine-inspired, aluminum-clad Airship 002 is located on four acres of expansive greenery on the the Isle of Mull and comes equipped with all the amenities needed to disconnect from life’s hustle and bustle. The Airship 002, which rents for $168 a night , stands out in the idyllic landscape thanks to its elongated form capped with two all-glass domes on either side. Clad in  shiny aluminum , the building has a nautical theme – immediately noticeable thanks to multiple portholes in the walls. Inside the tiny pod, wood paneling creates a warm interior enhanced by an abundance of natural light. Related: Escape to this dreamy Airbnb eco retreat in a pristine Yucatan reserve Although the Airship is a compact structure, the contemporary interior design creates a warm and relaxing atmosphere. The kitchen is an open space with all of the amenities needed to create a home-cooked meal. To open up space throughout the tiny structure, space-saving techniques, such as a fold-out table, keep the living area uncluttered. Located just past the kitchen area, the bedroom features a comfy four-poster queen bed. A pair of portholes over the bed allows guests to enjoy a bit of stargazing as they drift off to sleep. At the heart of the interior are the two domed glass walls  on either side of the pod. A serene seating area with a wood-burning stove looks out over the mountains and sea to the west. On the opposite side, a large writing desk faces the beautiful Sound of Mull. A wooden deck with outdoor seating on the side of the pod offers additional views of the incredible surroundings. + Roderick James Architects + Airship 002 Via Uncrate Photography by Nigel Rigden

Excerpt from: 
Take a break in this nautically inspired tiny pod on a Scottish island

A former ski lift station takes on new life as a bold mountain lodge

July 12, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A former ski lift station takes on new life as a bold mountain lodge

A small mountain lodge has replaced an old ski lift station on the Krkonoše mountains in the Czech Republic. Czech studio ADR designed the ?erná Voda, named after a nearby stream, to serve as a place of respite for short-term guests of a nearby lodge’s owner. The isolated retreat stands in a meadow apart from the Horní Malá Úpa village, among tall trees and lush shrubbery that shroud the cabin in serenity. Stepping inside the ?erná Voda, guests will find a bright, minimalist design. Light timber, which covers the walls, floors and ceilings, creates an open, airy feel. The kitchen space offers a sharp contrast with blackened wood cabinetry. The simple interior draws focus to the large windows and their picturesque views of the mountains , including Sn?žka, the highest mountain peak in the country. One window opens to the outdoors and allows a breath of fresh air into the cabin. Upstairs, a sleeping loft outfitted with protective netting offers a quiet space for visitors to rest. As natural light filters into the ground floor at daybreak, the loft benefits from the pitched ceiling and retains some darkness for guests who prefer to sleep in. During cooler months, a small wood-burning stove keeps the cabin toasty and inviting after a long day of exploring the outdoors. The mountain lodge blends into its forested surroundings in the summer with its dark metal and blackened wood cladding. When the landscape becomes blanketed in snow, the gabled cabin stands out boldly in its environment. On the west end of the home, a deck extends the living areas to the outdoors. The ?erná Voda mountain lodge has been nominated for a 2018 Czech Architecture Award , which promotes projects that embrace the public and the environment by both new and seasoned architects. + ADR Images via Jakub Skokan and Martin T?ma / BoysPlayNice

Read more from the original source: 
A former ski lift station takes on new life as a bold mountain lodge

Scientists uncover giant canyons under the ice in Antarctica

May 29, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Scientists uncover giant canyons under the ice in Antarctica

Researchers have discovered three large canyons frozen beneath the ice of Antarctica , each of which is hundreds of kilometers in length. The canyons, which move through tall mountains that lie beneath the snowy surface of the southernmost continent, were discovered through radar and may serve a key function in Antarctic ice flow. “These troughs channelize ice from the center of the continent, taking it toward the coast,” study co-author Kate Winter told the BBC . “Therefore, if climate conditions change in Antarctica, we might expect the ice in these troughs to flow a lot faster toward the sea. That makes them really important, and we simply didn’t know they existed before now.” The three canyons are the Patuxent Trough, the Offset Rift Basin and the Foundation Trough, the largest of the three, which is more than 350 kilometers long and 35 kilometers wide. The bottom of the Foundation Trough is buried beneath two kilometers of ice. All three canyons are located beneath and across the high ice ridge known as the ice divide that runs from the South Pole toward West Australia. This divide is similar to other continental divides, such as those found in North America , in which water, or ice, flows toward different bodies of water based on which side of the divide it falls. Related: Scientists dash to explore Antarctic ecosystem hidden by ice for 120,000 years These newly-discovered canyons have altered scientists’ understanding of Antarctica’s future in a warming climate . “People had called this area a bottleneck,” study co-author Tom Jordan said . “The thought was that if the West Antarctic Ice Sheet were to collapse, then ice could flood out from the east. But the mountains we’ve found effectively put a plug in that bottleneck.” The data, much of which was unobtainable through satellite imagery, was gathered using radar and sensors attached to planes that surveyed the continent from above. “Remarkably, the South Pole region is one of the least understood frontiers in the whole of Antarctica,” researcher Fausto Ferraccioli said. “Our new aerogeophysical data will … enable new research into the geological processes that created the mountains and basins before the Antarctic ice sheet itself was born.” + PolarGAP Project Via BBC Images via Depositphotos (1, 2)

See the original post here: 
Scientists uncover giant canyons under the ice in Antarctica

Escape the everyday in this Geodesic Dome House in Palm Springs

May 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Escape the everyday in this Geodesic Dome House in Palm Springs

Inspired by 20th-century architect R. Buckminster Fuller , architect Pavlina Williams transformed a decrepit dome house in Palm Springs into a dreamy retreat that channels bohemian and mid-century modern vibes. Now available as a vacation rental on Boutique Homes , the Geodesic Dome House offers stunning desert views on a private five-acre lot. Keep reading for a peek inside. Pavlina  and her husband Carter worked on their passion project on weekends and completed the renovation in a year. The key to the redesign was opening up the interior to natural light; Pavlina ordered custom windows from Home Depot to create a band of glazing for panoramic views . For a more modern appearance, Pavlina and Carter ripped up the existing flooring to expose the structural slab, which they then polished. Related: Couple spent seven years handcrafting their dream geodesic home In contrast to its bohemian exterior, the interior is bright and airy with a mid-century modern aesthetic in homage to the movement’s impact on Palm Springs . When asked by Boutique Homes about her favorite part of the home, Pavlina replied, “The location and the views. It’s five acres — and you hardly see the neighbors. You’re in the middle of nowhere. I mean that in a good way. You have the windmills all around you, so it feels like this is the end of the road, like you are here on your own. I love the desert, I love the mountains. In my mind, it’s really all about what’s around it.” The three-bedroom, 2.5-bath home accommodates up to six guests with rates starting at $245 a night . + Geodesic Dome House Images via Boutique Homes

See the original post here:
Escape the everyday in this Geodesic Dome House in Palm Springs

Disconnect in these A-frame tiny cabins in the Catskills

May 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Disconnect in these A-frame tiny cabins in the Catskills

The Catskills area will soon welcome the Eastwind Hotel , a 1920s bunk house that has been converted into a gorgeous boutique hotel and accompanying tiny cabins. The space is geared toward outdoor enthusiasts looking to enjoy the lush Windham Mountain area. For those really looking to get back to nature, the hotel offers a series of tiny A-frame huts that provide guests with a solitary off-grid experience. The 14-by-14-foot Lushna Cabins are tucked into the landscape overlooking Windham Mountain — just a two hour drive north from New York City. With a simple aesthetic, the cabins are designed to return guests to nature. The huts are insulated to withstand the seasons, and each structure has a single window that offers  natural light and incredible views of the surroundings. Related: Couple builds tiny A-frame cabin in three weeks for only $700 The wooden cabins are equipped with a simple queen-sized bed with top-of-the-line linens, a wooden chest and plenty of wildlife journals to take while exploring the area. Visitors can also make use of the provided camping kits, complete with grilling equipment to use in the fire pits. The hotel’s goal is to meet the needs of all types of guests. For those who’d like a little bit more luxury, there are boutique suites that offer the best in amenities. Visitors will also be able to choose from various events and activities including outdoor movie screenings in summer, game nights in winter, concerts, classes and outdoor excursions. Eastwind Hotel & Bar is slated to open for business this June. + Eastwind Hotel & Bar Via Dwell Images via Eastwind Hotel & Bar

Continued here: 
Disconnect in these A-frame tiny cabins in the Catskills

BIG designs a high-end tiny house that goes off-grid

May 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on BIG designs a high-end tiny house that goes off-grid

Bjarke Ingels Group has revealed images for the firm’s first-ever tiny house—the A45—designed for the prefab-housing startup Klein . Inspired by the traditional A-frame cabin, the A45 takes on an angular form conducive to rain run-off and easy construction. The 180-square-foot timber cabin boasts a completely customizable interior design and can be built within four to six months in any location. Constructed in Upstate New York, the prototype for the A45 tiny house is clad in blackened pine with a triangular glazed end wall to immerse homeowners in nature even when they’re indoors. The triangular floor-to-ceiling window—made up of seven glass pieces—and the soaring 13-foot-tall ceiling help create a sense of spaciousness despite the structure’s small 180-square-foot size. The cabin is slightly elevated on four concrete piers in order to minimize site impact and to give homeowners the freedom to place the tiny home in areas without heavy machinery. “The resulting crystal-like shape gives A45 an ever-changing appearance,” said BIG in a statement about their modification of the traditional A-frame cabin. “Upon entering, the 180 [square-foot] interior space reflects a minimal Nordic abode prioritized for ‘hyggelig’ comfort and design.” The subtle natural material palette, from the exposed timber frame built of solid pine to the Douglas Fir floor planks and the space-grade insulating natural cork walls, further emphasizes the Scandinavian aesthetic. Cedar clads the compact bathroom, and the fixtures were sourced from VOLA. Related: This tiny timber cabin was built from construction waste for under $30K The A45 tiny house comprises 100% recyclable materials including the timber frame, wall modules, and subfloor. The home get all of its power from  solar panels, and the service equipment is hidden from view in the back. The cozy interior is furnished with a Morsøe wood-burning stove and handcrafted Nordic furniture including pieces by Carl Hansen and a bed fitted with Soren Rose Studio’s Kvadrat fabrics. Københavns Møbelsnedkeri designed the petite kitchen. + Bjarke Ingels Group + Klein Via AD Images via BIG

Go here to see the original: 
BIG designs a high-end tiny house that goes off-grid

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1899 access attempts in the last 7 days.