Trail use by outdoor enthusiasts is driving out an elk herd in Colorado

August 27, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Trail use by outdoor enthusiasts is driving out an elk herd in Colorado

Home, home on the range? Not so much for an elk herd near Vail, Colorado. Unfortunately, the number of elk among this group has dropped off dramatically, and it could worsen if outdoor enthusiasts continue scaring them away. In February, researchers flew over unit 45 where the elk reside and counted just 53; at one time there were more than 1,000. The herd makes its home between 7,000 and 11,000 feet on hills and at the top of the Colorado Rockies. Related: Glenwood Springs, Colorado set to run on 100% renewable energy “Very few elk, not even many tracks,” the researchers noted . “Lots of backcountry skiing tracks.” Wildlife managers say growing numbers of hikers , mountain bikers, skiers, ATV and motorcyclists are among those causing the herd population to shrink. Visiting U.S. parks and wilderness areas for recreation has become a popular pastime; Yosemite , for instance, reports around 5 million people visit annually. Bill Alldredge, a retired wildlife professor at Colorado State University, believes the reason the elk and their calves have died off is because of the increase in outdoor recreational enthusiasts hitting the trails near unit 45. In Colorado , a hot-spot for outdoor fun and trail use, visitation to the elk area has more than doubled since 2009; reports say about 170,000 people visit per year. According to Bill Andree, a wildlife manager for Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s Vail district, unit 45 is busy 24-7, 365 days a year. Even night trail use in some sections has increased by 30 percent in the past 10 years. Andree began studying unit 45 in the 1980s because of the rise in ski resorts and trails systems. He researched how humans impacted the elk calves by sending hikers into the calves’ area. About 30 percent of the elk calves died when their mothers were disturbed, but when the outdoor enthusiasts stopped, the number of calves returned. Why calves die after being disturbed by human activity isn’t crystal clear, but some researchers say it could be because the mothers get scared by people and dogs passing. If mothers run too far for their babies to catch up, this may result in starvation and possible attacks by other animals . Signs have been posted to prevent explorers from disturbing elk habitats, but while a majority of nature-lovers obey, the fraction of people who cross those lines continue to cause stress to elk populations. Via The Guardian Images via Bob Denaro and Mark Byzewski

See the rest here:
Trail use by outdoor enthusiasts is driving out an elk herd in Colorado

5 Matriarchal Animal Species That Prove Fox News’ Erick Erickson Wrong About What Nature Intended

June 5, 2013 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on 5 Matriarchal Animal Species That Prove Fox News’ Erick Erickson Wrong About What Nature Intended

Recently Fox News’ Erik Erickson, editor-in-chief of RedState.com, complained about a Pew report that found  mothers as the primary or sole breadwinners in 40 percent of American households with kids . In true Fox News fashion, Erickson went off on a tangent, saying that anyone with a basic knowledge of biology knows that nature intends  males  to be the dominant gender—any other way would “very anti-science” he claimed. This statement offended many, and in response to Erickson, Inhabitat writer Beth Buczynski has come up with a counterargument that lets the laws of nature do the talking. Read on to learn about 5 matriarchal animal species. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Animals , apes , beehive , bees , Bonobos , breadwinners , elephants , Erick Erickson , killer whales , lions , matriarchal societies , matriarchy , Mothers , orcas        

Continued here:
5 Matriarchal Animal Species That Prove Fox News’ Erick Erickson Wrong About What Nature Intended

Scientists Find Children’s Cells Living In Mothers’ Brains

February 9, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Scientists Find Children’s Cells Living In Mothers’ Brains

The link between mother and child during pregnancy is perhaps the closest that two humans can ever be linked, but after childbirth they become two separate individuals — or do they? New research suggests that the connection between mother and child may be much stronger than previously thought. The study, which was published recently in  PLOS ONE , reveals that male cells have been found in the brains of women, sometimes decades after a woman had given birth. The findings could have broad implications, ranging from disease prevention to identifying immune disorders. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: blood-brain barrier , DNA , genetic biology , genetics , Mothers , neuroscience , parenting , pregnancy

Continued here:
Scientists Find Children’s Cells Living In Mothers’ Brains

Bad Behavior has blocked 2284 access attempts in the last 7 days.