400-year-old baroque restaurant Three Roses receives a sensitive facelift

July 19, 2021 by  
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This monastery-turned- restaurant has given architectural planners 400 years of layers to reveal — and celebrate. The gradual unveiling is being handled by ADR architectural studio with a mission to respect the original architecture in the process. Known as the Broumov Monastery, the building originated in the era of baroque architecture. Rather than demolishing the masterpiece in favor of modernization, the design team is painstakingly refurbishing one section at a time. This is in conjunction with a variety of other projects the studio has tackled in the complex, including the Café Dietzenhofer, revitalization of the R?žový dv?r (The Rose Yard), a new visitor center and the U T?í r?ží (Three Roses) restaurant in the south wing. Related: Eco-friendly spiritual living at Holy Wisdom Monastery Over the centuries, the monastery has seen many uses and suffered a period of neglect and disrepair. The current investor asked the team to renovate the space while staying true to the original footprint, which didn’t exactly match modern needs. The resulting Three Roses Restaurant is a nod to the original pub that served food and drink in the location for the first few hundred years before the decay began, so history was on their side. Still, designers had to reverse inadequate previous attempts at improvements and overcome other obstacles. Working with preservationists, the studio worked meticulously to salvage items with historical relevance and replicate the authentic appeal of the baroque era. Separate yet connected vaults, a kitchen, an event room and indoor and outdoor dining areas are discovered through corridors accented by distinctive archways and terrazzo tile floors made from a local producer. Along the way, every surface that could be salvaged or resurfaced has remained inside the building, including old flooring that became a bar top and layers of paint that were left as-is to reveal the history of the space.  Inside the kitchen, the original tile stove, stone moldings and a number of tiny little windows and doors found in unexpected positions have benefitted from refurbishing, too. Original casement windows and paneled doors were preserved in the spirit of authenticity as well as inspiration for modern conversation. All salvageable, historically relevant items have been refurbished or replicated, and the restaurant is filled with rustic wood tables and wall paneling for a traditional pub vibe. + ADR Studio Photography by BoysPlayNice via ADR Studio

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400-year-old baroque restaurant Three Roses receives a sensitive facelift

This backyard cottage in Seattle is only 800 square feet

July 16, 2021 by  
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Everyone has their idea for the perfect home. For this couple, it’s a comfortable crash pad with natural eleme nts that provides them a simple yet functional space for downtime in between outdoor adventures. Located in the Central Area neighborhood in Seattle , Washington, this 800-square-foot home is a backyard cottage with a lot to offer. Not only does it feature enviable sleek lines and built-in storage, but the entire design intermingles indoors with outdoors to match the clients’ active lifestyle. Designed by Seattle-based firm Fivedot in collaboration with contractor Hanson Construction and Equlibria Engineering, this urban oasis is L-shaped to take advantage of a central courtyard, which is accessible from both the main living area and the bedroom. Related: Orchard House honors the past while building a brighter future The home is a single-story to accommodate needs as the couple ages, but also so they can enjoy high ceilings. Exposed wood beams draw the eye to the ceiling and provide a spacious feel for the small place.Expansive windows and a wall-to-wall retractable door flood the interior with natural light. The door opens to the courtyard , blurring the line between inside and out. Once outside, the courtyard features a sitting area, fire pit, a separate dining area and plenty of room for guests or additional seating. The garage provides additional storage for outdoor gear and a workshop space. On the exterior wall, designers included a mini climbing wall, which also serves as roof access, as a nod to the couple’s passion for the sport. Entering from the alley, a landscaped courtyard welcomes guests with plants and a wooden walkway. The front door, otherwise completely hidden against the dark Yakisugi (burnt Japanese cypress) siding, entices with a colorful welcome mat and striking accent colors around the frame. For the nature-loving couple, the space features natural materials such as Oregon white oak casework and milestone walls for the shower. The project reflects the values of a simple life and provides the added benefit of low maintenance requirements. + Fivedot Photography by Mark Woods

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This backyard cottage in Seattle is only 800 square feet

Moon wobble could lead to massive flooding

July 16, 2021 by  
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Considering retiring on the coast one day? Better rethink your plans. A new NASA study explains that a cute-sounding phenomenon called a “ moon wobble” could lead to devastating coastal floods in the next decade. “In the mid-2030s, every U.S. coast will experience rapidly increasing high-tide floods, when a lunar cycle will amplify rising sea levels caused by climate change ,” the report warned. Related: Severe coastal floods could affect 287 million people by 2100 But don’t expect to look up and catch a glimpse of a jumpy moon. The wobble refers to an 18.6-year cycle that sharp-eyed astronomers first noted in 1728. During the cycle, the moon wobbles a little in one direction, then the other. One way means lower tides, the other, higher. As you can imagine, higher tides coupled with rising seas will mean some very wet and ruined  coastal  cities that could put humans at risk. “We’re going to have sort of a double-whammy,” William Sweet,  National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration  (NOAA) oceanographer and one of the study’s authors, told The Washington Post. “It means that coastal communities — unless they adapt and fortify — are likely to expect even greater flooding than they might otherwise.” In 2019 alone, NOAA tracked 600  floods  caused by high tides on the Gulf and East Coasts. Once the moon wobbles, this number could shoot up. NASA said some clusters of floods could last over a month. Not only could we have flooding, but also public health disasters like stinking cesspools. The moon is now amping up for the flood-prone half of its cycle. And if the human race survives for another 18.6-year cycle, the next one will be worse, thanks to rising  oceans . In the 2030s, Hawaii and Guam will be in trouble, along with just about every piece of U.S. coastline, except perhaps Alaska. For the study,  researchers  examined 89 coastal locations in U.S. states and territories. They studied astronomical cycles and predicted the likelihood of how the moon will affect tides and flooding up to the year 2080. NASA’s  Sea Level Portal  helps citizens better understand what might be in store. Via HuffPost , AlJazeera Lead image via Pixabay

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Moon wobble could lead to massive flooding

Europe’s largest Carmel currently under construction will be green too

August 8, 2011 by  
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Ritu Mathur: Liverpool Monastery The largest Carmel currently under construction in Europe Liverpool has always had some kind of association with the Roman Catholic faith and now this association is taking a giant leap forward as a new monastery is being constructed in Allerton, Liverpool. This monastery will be the biggest Carmelite monastery in the entire Europe. 30 Carmelite Sisters will be leaving their present home in West Derby because two big schools are coming up adjacent to the monastery, disturbing the peace and solitude required by Nuns for leading their virtuous lives. The £3 million project will also include a lot of eco friendly and sustainable initiatives. A total of 1500 trees and plants will be planted in the new monastery. The idea is to make the architecture self sufficient and at the same time protect the local habitat. Besides, provisions have been made for wildflower meadow, ground source heating, solar panels and rainwater harvesting to make the monastery energy efficient. Before this move of Carmelite monastery to leave their 104 years old home in West Derby, the nuns of Our Lady of Consolation have also shifted their base to Yorkshire after the opening of Stanbrook Abbey in 2009 where many sustainable initiatives were involved. A Liverpool based construction company, Nobles Construction, is working on the project on a plot of 36,000 sq m. This 60 week long project is expected to come to an end by the summers of 2012. The three storey building has been designed by the architect duo of Austin Smith and Lord. The building will have a chapel, a cloister and work areas. It will also feature a day-night care facility for elder nuns. Via: Theconstructionindex

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