Flexible greenery-covered prefab pops up in just 3 months in Vietnam

December 14, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Brick and concrete dominate Vietnam’s built landscape, but Module K is helping to usher in a new contemporary building type that’s prefabricated, flexible, and transportable. The Vietnamese design studio recently completed Serene House HCMC, a modular steel structure in Ho Chi Minh City that only took three months to realize from concept to completion. Located in the hipster district Thao Dien, this modern building mixes modernist style with Indochine influences. Nestled between classic and French-inspired villas, the three-story Serene House HCMC is a mixed-use building with built-in flexibility to cater to the changing needs of the tenants. “We chose a prefabricated steel structure solution, quite uncommon in Vietnam where the traditional construction is bricks and concrete,” said Jade Nguyê?n Kim Ngo?c, design director of Module K. “It’s cost effective, easy to erect and disassemble, extremely flexible and very light and airy. We can easily break it up when our ten-year lease ends and move it to a new location for another serene house of our own. It also helps preserve the initial capital investment.” Related: Giant bamboo planters protect a Ho Chi Minh City home from the sun and rain Described as a “three-dimensional puzzle,” the interior features both double-height ceilings and lower mezzanines and currently houses a coffee shop, furniture showroom, apartments, and office space, as well as a rooftop terrace. Glazing wraps around the operable facade to let in plenty of natural light and blur the line between inside and out. Tropical plants punctuate the interior and grow around the building from the climbing plants that drape down from the roof and window planters to the ground-floor garden. Locally produced LAVA -designed furnishings and lighting are featured in the rooms. + Module K Images by Hiroyuki Oki

See more here:
Flexible greenery-covered prefab pops up in just 3 months in Vietnam

Zaha Hadid Architects futuristic KAPSARC named Saudi Arabias smartest building

October 26, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Zaha Hadid Architects futuristic KAPSARC named Saudi Arabias smartest building

Despite its name, the King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Centre (KAPSARC) is big on renewable energy, as evidenced by its LEED Platinum certification—the first of Zaha Hadid Architects’ projects to receive the title. Located in the Riyadh Plateau, KAPSARC is a non-profit dedicated to studying energy and their environmental impacts. The crystalline and futuristic campus recently opened to the public for Saudi Design Week 2017; the Honeywell Smart Building Awards program named the project Saudi Arabia’s ‘smartest’ building after its many eco-conscious features. Made up of white hexagonal prismatic honeycomb structures, KAPSARC uses its partially modular system to optimize solar orientation, increase connectivity, and maximize daylighting . The building massing and facade optimization helped the structure achieve a 45% reduction in energy performance (compared to the ASHRAE baseline standards), while the solar array that tops a south-facing roof provides renewable energy with a capacity of 5,000MWh per year. “A research centre is by its very nature a forward-looking institution and KAPSARC’s architecture also looks to the future with a formal composition that can be expanded or adapted without compromising the centre’s visual character,” wrote the architects. Related: Zaha Hadid Architects unveils designs for wave-inspired Melbourne apartment tower The 70,000-square-meter campus comprises five buildings: the Energy Knowledge Centre; the Energy Computer Centre; a Conference Centre with exhibition hall and 300-seat auditorium; a Research Library with archives for 100,000 volumes; and the Musalla, an inspirational place for prayer within the campus. Each building differs in size and is flexible enough to adapt to different uses or changes in requirements. The facade features a strong protective shell to shield the interior from the harsh climate. All KAPSARC’s potable water is recycled and reused onsite while all of its irrigation water is used from non-potable sources. Forty percent of the campus’ construction materials were locally sourced and thirty percent of the materials are made with recycled content. + Zaha Hadid Architects Images by Hufton + Crow

See more here:
Zaha Hadid Architects futuristic KAPSARC named Saudi Arabias smartest building

Natural light floods this solar-powered business school in Frankfurt

October 26, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Natural light floods this solar-powered business school in Frankfurt

According to the World Green Building Council , students score higher on tests and learn up to 26% faster when placed in rooms lit by natural light. Danish practice Henning Larsen Architects took this report to heart when they designed the Frankfurt School of Finance & Management, a light-filled academic building that officially opens today. Powered by solar and wind energy, this sustainability-minded business school takes cues from its urban surroundings while setting “new standards for transparent and open learning in the world of business and finance.” Transparency, community, and visibility are key to the design of the 32,790-square-meter Frankfurt School of Finance & Management . To open the school up the urban setting, the architects centered the development around the Street of Knowledge, a long public atrium that echoes The Zeil, one of Frankfurt’s oldest commercial streets. A wide variety of glass-fronted rooms branch off on either side of the Street of Knowledge in two north-south facing volumes that reinforce the atrium’s likeness to a real city street. Above the third floor terrace, these two parallel buildings turn into five offset towers of flexible 400-square-meter office units. Designed to the DGNB Platinum standard, the school reduces demands of primary energy by 60 percent as compared to the German energy saving ordinance (EnEV) standards. Computer simulations and calculations led the architects to optimize the building shape and facade, constructed with a mix of opaque and transparent elements, early on in the design process to minimize energy needs, solar radiation, noise pollution, and wind. Rooftop photovoltaics and a wind turbine supplement energy needs, while rainwater retention systems slow the effects of intense rainfall. The skylight and careful building orientation maximize access to natural light . Related: Frankfurt named the most sustainable city on the planet “As architects we know that light is one of the most important factors for learning,” said Partner and Design Principal at Henning Larsen, Louis Becker. “It helps improving our focus and performance. My hope and ambition is that the varied daylight-filled spaces we have created for Frankfurt School of Finance & Management will contribute to the important task of educating students that will excel within their field and give something back to the city of Frankfurt.” + Henning Larsen Images by Henning Larsen/Karsten Thormaehlen

Original post:
Natural light floods this solar-powered business school in Frankfurt

Set up camp anywhere with Latvia’s luxurious Camping Box

May 30, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Set up camp anywhere with Latvia’s luxurious Camping Box

Camping just got a lot more glamorous with the Camping Box , a modular eco-friendly box that’s super easy to set up. InBoxLifestyle designed the creative tent or camper alternative, and their 97-square-foot box can house four people comfortably. The Latvia -based company says their Camping Box allows campers to escape into nature while feeling like they’re staying at a fancy hotel . The Camping Box is about what it sounds like: a box you can set up just about anywhere and sleep or cook inside while camping. But these innovative dwellings are designed to be a step up from your standard camper or tent; according to the company, they provide “high class hotel benefits in the middle of nowhere.” Related: Sublime tiny cabins in British Columbia that can be installed within hours The modular boxes are easy to maintain and move. They’re made of fiberglass , and are rain and snow resistant. They can also be popped up without project approval. They don’t take up a lot of space, so could be tucked into a corner of a backyard or forest. InBoxLifestyle says their Camping Boxes will last for years, and are nature friendly. The design of the company’s boxes is energy efficient thanks to what they describe as the latest generation ventilation and heating system. The boxes can be connected to the grid or water and sewage systems. But InBoxLifestyle does say on their website that boxes in remote locations can have an individual solution for water and sewage. InBoxLifestyle offers multiple floor plans for their Camping Box, including ones for two or four people, ones with kitchens, bathrooms, or showers, and even a sauna and Jacuzzi box. Prices for the four-person option start at $13,416.60. The company works with clients to design the interior according to what amenities a person wants inside their Camping Box. The Camping Box isn’t the only modular box setup InBoxLifestyle offers. They offer a Gym Box, Kitchen Box, and Office Box, to name a few. Check out more on their website . + InBoxLifestyle Images via InBoxLifestyle ( 1 , 2 ) and screenshots

Read more: 
Set up camp anywhere with Latvia’s luxurious Camping Box

Beautiful cabin pops up in ten days with minimal landscape disturbance

February 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Beautiful cabin pops up in ten days with minimal landscape disturbance

BIO Architects recently completed a modern modular cabin, proving yet again how beautiful homes can be affordable with the help of prefabrication . Commissioned by a young couple that desired a cost-effective home on the lake, the prefabricated cabin is the latest iteration in the Russian firm’s line of modular Dubldom homes. The dwelling, located at Pirogovo Lake in the suburbs of Moscow, was installed in roughly ten days with minimal site impact. The lakeside cabin, named DublDom 2.110, is the client’s second Dubldom commission following BIO Architects’ completion of a compact 40-square-meter Dubldom house in 2015. Since none of the firm’s standard prefabricated models were suitable for the site, the architects created a custom design that still retained the Dubldom’s iconic gabled shape and full-height glazing . To keep costs at a minimum, the new 185-square-meter build was constructed with natural and affordable materials that help blend the home into the forested environment. “Most of the individual decisions are based on a simple technology and inexpensive materials, so we managed to follow one of the basic principles of DublDom company—quality of architecture at an affordable pricing,” wrote BIO Architects. “The front facade with the maximum number of glazing was dictated by location of the house on the site. All the technical and utility rooms are located along the rear facade, and the children’s room, office, main entrance and the living room with fireplace look at the site with a wonderful view on the water.” Related: Affordable DublDom prefab home pops up in just one week The modules were prefabricated in Kazan and were delivered with the interior trim, utilities, furniture, and electrical equipment pre-installed. Installation on-site took roughly ten days to complete. + BIO Architects

Go here to see the original:
Beautiful cabin pops up in ten days with minimal landscape disturbance

Penda unveils temporary nature-filled village for the Beijing Horticultural Expo

January 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Penda unveils temporary nature-filled village for the Beijing Horticultural Expo

Architecture studio Penda’s love of modular, timber architecture will make waves at Beijing’s International Horticultural Expo 2019 in the form of a stunning, village-like exhibition space. Commissioned by property developer Vanke , the 30,000-square-meter complex is remarkably different from the typical expo pavilion, which is usually designed as a single large building where visitors must queue to enter and are guided from place to place. Instead, Penda created a sprawling exhibition space, called Thousand Yards, that’s filled with plants and winding paths to encourage individual exploration and discovery. Selected as the winning design in Vanke’s invited competition, Thousand Yards features a series of color-coded timber modular units massed in organic, asymmetrical patterns around a central plaza. “The pavilion was designed as a network of small scale units,” said Precht. “It was a core feature to avoid a large, iconic structure that covers a majority of the land. Rather, we wanted to create a village-like typology that can be explored by the visitors.” The modular units will be prefabricated using cross-laminated timber and constructed using an eight-by-eight-meter configuration inspired by an ancient Chinese measuring system called Li. Related: Penda’s Low-Impact Modular Bamboo Hotel Reconnects Visitors with Nature Greenery will be woven throughout the site on multiple levels, from the ground floor to the rooftops. Visitors will also be given a packet of seeds when they enter and asked to plant them on the roofs. Winding pathways, hidden views, and the unpredictable placement of architecture offers visitors the chance to make discoveries of their surroundings, from unexpected playgrounds and vegetable gardens to a teahouse and food court. + Penda Via Dezeen

Continued here: 
Penda unveils temporary nature-filled village for the Beijing Horticultural Expo

Affordable and compact Dinky Dub camper offers a modular twist to the vintage VW look

November 2, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Affordable and compact Dinky Dub camper offers a modular twist to the vintage VW look

Weighing in at just 1,000 pounds, the Dinky Dub does come with some sacrifices when compared with its full-sized sibling. The smaller VW Type 2 tow-along loses a pair of windows, 3 feet in length, and the pop-top roof, which means the interior height is maxed out at 4.3 feet. In return for these tradeoffs, the Dinky Dub starts at just $12,800—a fraction of the cost of the larger models. Related: Airstream’s new Basecamp is a tiny house you can tow practically anywhere The Dinky Dub is centered on a convertible dinette set flanked by benches that transform into a two-person bed. A modular kitchenette is tucked into the rear hatch and can be customized to include a sink and portable stove. Since the Dinky Dub was created with a modular design, buyers are free to customize their trailer from the inclusion of solar panels to additional appliances. Dub Box is finalizing design details and plans to launch the Dinky Dub, which is available for reservations, in 2017. + Dinky Dub Via New Atlas Images via Dub Box

Here is the original post:
Affordable and compact Dinky Dub camper offers a modular twist to the vintage VW look

Prefab Casa Algarrobo mimics the rhythm of surrounding trees in Chile

July 13, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Prefab Casa Algarrobo mimics the rhythm of surrounding trees in Chile

The volume of Algarrobo House is divided into areas housing different programs: private, semi-private and public. Its modular structure makes it easy to differentiate between open and intimate spaces, occupied areas, circulation, and terraces. Providing views of the forest on each side, the house becomes a perfect place for enjoying the Chilean natural landscapes . Related: Minimalist timber CML House in Chile features a unique pinwheel layout Moments of privacy are distributed throughout the interior, including in the living room, circulation routes and bedrooms. Prefab structure allowed the architects to play with the concept of rhythm and introduce subtle elements that break up the order to form distinct environments. + Garcia de la Huerta and Gleixner architects

Go here to see the original: 
Prefab Casa Algarrobo mimics the rhythm of surrounding trees in Chile

Modroof: low-budget cardboard roofing that doesn’t leak during monsoon season

June 7, 2016 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Modroof: low-budget cardboard roofing that doesn’t leak during monsoon season

In areas where poverty is rampant, sometimes a roof over one’s head simply isn’t enough. Corrugated metal roofs are costly, can be dangerous, and are insufferably hot during summer months. That’s where Modroof by Re-Materials comes in; it’s an affordable modular paneling system made from fortified, recycled cardboard pulp that keeps residents drier, safer, and leaves them with leftover money in their pockets. Villages in India are starting to look a bit different thanks to stark blue rooftops made from recycled agricultural and packaging waste. Modroof panels are incredibly durable, able to withstand water and fire, and last much longer than other roofing materials. Typically homes are roofed with concrete or corrugated metal, which can create problems from unbearably uncomfortable heat, leaking during monsoon season, and even health issues. Related: Google’s Project Sunroof spreads to potentially reach 43 million rooftops The modular design allows for easy transport and installation, as well as replacement of individual panels. Residents need not worry about high costs, either, as affordable payment plans are made available so low-income families can improve their homes without having to wait. Re-Materials is also looking to equip the panels with solar cells so families can power their homes cheaply and sustainably. + Re-Materials Via  Fast Company Images via Re-Materials

Read more here:
Modroof: low-budget cardboard roofing that doesn’t leak during monsoon season

The Earth’s magnetic field is weakening ten times faster than expected

June 7, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on The Earth’s magnetic field is weakening ten times faster than expected

New satellite data from the European Space Agency has revealed some puzzling findings : the Earth’s magnetic field appears to be weakening much faster than previous research would suggest. These measurements show that on the whole, the planet’s geomagnetic field is weakening about ten times faster than expected, at a rate of about 5% every decade. However, it’s also important to note that in some regions it’s actually strengthened, particularly over Asia.

Originally posted here:
The Earth’s magnetic field is weakening ten times faster than expected

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1107 access attempts in the last 7 days.