Former concrete factory is reborn as a unique music-inspired high school in Denmark

February 26, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Former concrete factory is reborn as a unique music-inspired high school in Denmark

Dutch architecture firm MVRDV and Denmark-based COBE Architects have just finished construction on the Roskilde Festival Folk High School, an unconventional school built inside a former concrete factory in Roskilde’s Musicon creative district just outside Copenhagen. Created to further the “lifelong learning” values of the world-famous Roskilde Music Festival that takes place every year in the small town, the high school follows an immersive and “non-formal adult education” championed by the Danish system of folk high schools and is the first purpose-built school of its kind in Denmark in 50 years. The Roskilde Festival Folk High School marks the final phase of the 11,000-square-meter ROCKmagneten masterplan, also designed by MVRDV and COBE, and includes the school — set inside a former concrete factory — two new modular blocks of student housing, a building for staff housing and a series of adaptable shipping container-based structures that will host an ever-changing group of innovative startups, many related to the music and youth culture. To complement Musicon’s creative character, the buildings are fitted with playful geometric shapes and vibrant colors along with different materials inspired by the music festival. “Our design, just like the school itself, was inspired by the spirit of the Roskilde Festival . It is all about music, art, activism — but most of all, freedom,” says Jacob van Rijs, principal and co-founder of MVRDV. “The Roskilde festival combines ‘having a good time’ with innovation in an informal way, giving a special vibe that we wanted to capture in the design of the interior of the school.” Related: COBE Architects to transform Copenhagen’s Paper Island into a bustling cultural hub For the school, the architects used a “box-within-a-box” concept to divide the factory’s large industrial space into smaller usable spaces. The colorful modules can be used for a variety of programming including a 150-seat auditorium  — named the Orange Stage after the main stage of the Festival — a music studio, a workshop, and classrooms for dance, art and architecture. The recently completed school and housing joins the rock museum Ragnarock, completed in 2016, that’s wrapped in a striking facade of gold-colored aluminum in an expression of youth culture. + MVRDV + COBE Architects Images by Rasmus Hjortshøj – COAST and Ossip van Duivenbode

More here:
Former concrete factory is reborn as a unique music-inspired high school in Denmark

Flat-pack treehouse offers "extreme wilderness" glamping with a light footprint

February 8, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Flat-pack treehouse offers "extreme wilderness" glamping with a light footprint

British company Tree Tents International has unveiled its most innovative and adaptable glamping structure yet. Meet the Fuselage, a flat-pack treehouse that can be set up almost anywhere, even on the most challenging terrain. Dubbed by the firm as an “extreme wilderness cabin,” the cylindrical dwelling takes inspiration from modern aerospace design for its durable and lightweight structure. Designed with a triple-layer insulated skin, low-voltage radiant heating and a micro wood stove, the solar-powered Fuselage has been precision-engineered for thermal comfort in a wide variety of climate conditions, including the wintry environment of Northern Sweden, where one of Tree Tents’ first Fuselages was installed just a few hundred miles below the Arctic Circle. “I designed the Fuselage to access some pretty extreme environments — allowing people to stay in these amazing locations with a structure that is both lightweight in construction but as tough as old boots,” Fuselage designer Jason Thawley said in a press release. To minimize the environmental impact of the Fuselage, the structures are flat-pack and modular so that no heavy machinery is required onsite for installation. Built from sustainably sourced wood and recycled aluminum , the units can be suspended from trees or mounted on stilted feet without need for large foundations. The firm even uses the waste from the manufacturing process to make camping accessories, such as stools and rucksacks, as part of its commitment to sustainable design. Related: Pinecone-shaped treehouse provides stunning 360-degree views of dense Redwood forest Assembled from a kit, the Fuselage features a fully insulated wood-and-aluminum structural frame with an aluminum outer shell. The interior, which measures 3 by 5 meters, includes quality marine ply hardwood flooring and birch liner as well as a lockable entrance door and double-glazed windows . Each bespoke unit also comes with furnishings and can be upgraded with different custom offerings. The base price for Fuselage starts at £26,000 (about $33,672 USD), not including valued-added tax or installation costs. + Fuselage

Go here to see the original:
Flat-pack treehouse offers "extreme wilderness" glamping with a light footprint

Competition-winning Bamboo Stadium is a sustainable solution to Lagos former landfill

January 30, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Competition-winning Bamboo Stadium is a sustainable solution to Lagos former landfill

In Lagos , Nigeria, one of the world’s fastest growing cities, a visionary design has been proposed to rethink waste and provide much-needed urban green space atop the metropolis’ former Olusosun Landfill. The proposal, titled Bamboo Stadium, is the winner of ‘ Waste: Multipurpose Stadium ’, the latest open ideas architecture competition launched by architectural research initiative arch out loud. The sustainable design explores transforming the brownfield into a bamboo forest that would provide the raw material for building a future stadium and community gathering space on-site. According to arch out loud, Lagos had, until recently, managed waste by relocating it to the 100-acre Olusosun landfill opened in 1992. However, due to the metropolis’ rapid population growth, the once-remote landfill has now become edged in by urban development and was shut down earlier this year and rezoned for redevelopment as a public park by the local government. The WASTE Competition sought to explore new redevelopment ideas and how stadium typology could serve the surrounding community. Iulia Doroban?u and Lucas Monnereau of ENSA Paris Belleville submitted the competition-winning Bamboo Stadium design, which proposes turning the landfill into a community meeting space fitted with multipurpose and adaptable modular structures that can cater to housing and public facilities such as a marketplace, school, cinema, sport courts, shops, restaurants, and workshops. The stadium would therefore not only serve as a platform for local and international football matches, but could also be used year-round by the community for other purposes. Related: Nine African cities commit to reaching zero carbon by 2050 “We propose an evolutive system — from a bamboo forest and stadium to a checker-board infinite pattern, composed of built blocks and yards, alternating between them,” the designers explained. “Bamboo grown on the whole site will become the dominant building material: transformed in standardized arches that will bear the platforms and roof-structures, between yards and bridges. Patterned units make the construction process extremely efficient and cost-effective. The building act becomes possible in-situ, offering the flexibility to change form, add or retain pieces on short notice. Looking forward, a local grow and support of the direct participation of dwellers in the design work can raise awareness and repel the soil, reduce carbon emissions or heat in the process.” + Waste: Multipurpose Stadium Competition Images by Iulia Doroban?u and Lucas Monnereau via arch out loud

View post: 
Competition-winning Bamboo Stadium is a sustainable solution to Lagos former landfill

Massive shipping container shopping center to pop up in Warsaw

January 3, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Massive shipping container shopping center to pop up in Warsaw

Nearly 300  shipping containers may soon be given a new lease on life as a massive pop-up shopping center in downtown Warsaw, Poland. Designed by local architecture practice Szcz and commissioned by investor Nowa Epoka Handlu, the cargotecture proposal would transform a 2.6-acre site into one of the world’s largest shipping container retail complexes. Named Implant, the three-story modular building would house approximately 80 tenants and host mixed programming from retail and restaurants to social and cultural space. Proposed for an empty lot adjacent to Warsaw’s ?elazna Street and Chmielna Street, Implant aims to revitalize a once-thriving area that was gutted during World War II and has since struggled to return to its former brilliance. In addition to urban revitalization, the project will inject much-needed greenery into the area with open courtyards and vertical green walls. Modeled after existing shipping container pop-up malls such as London’s BoxPark and Bangkok’s ArtBox, Implant will include a usable floor area of 5,318 square meters and will be split in three main zones: food and beverage, retail, and social and cultural event space. A total of 273 shipping containers will be used: 221 40-foot-long containers and 52 20-foot-long containers. The bars and restaurants will be located on the ground floor of the three-story building while studios, shops and other services will be placed on the upper floors. Related: Boxpark, London’s first pop-up shipping container mall, opens in Shoreditch “Vertical division of functions represents the synergy between culinary consumption taking place on the ground floor, either inside or outside the bars, while more qualified functions attract people who have special interest in visiting furniture designers, craftsmen and artists located on the first floor,” the architecture firm said. “The lot is enclosed from the southern side with a lower building containing a multifunctional space for concerts, exhibitions and other events and a pop-up children’s museum accessible from the courtyard. The mix of bars, studios providing obligatory workshops for different age groups and large functions (children’s museums and multifunctional indoor space) will create a mix of users that will come to the complex due to varied motivations.” + Szcz Images via Szcz

Here is the original: 
Massive shipping container shopping center to pop up in Warsaw

Glass building in China is filled with soaring timber pillars in the shape of trees

December 19, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Glass building in China is filled with soaring timber pillars in the shape of trees

Beijing-based firm  LUO Studio has unveiled a beautiful, all-glass headquarters for an eco-farm operator in China’s Henan province. The transparent Longfu Life Experience Center features a spectacular interior comprised of multiple soaring timber “trees” that can be easily reconfigured or dismantled entirely. The modular design not only reflects the current company’s commitment to providing clients with greener lifestyles, but it offers future tenants an adaptable building structure with infinite possibilities. According to the architects, the inspiration of the design stemmed from wanting to develop a structure that could offer optimal flexibility for years to come. By using  modular design , the building’s three main volumes can be reconfigured depending on the desired use. The timber “clustered columns,” which were inspired by the shape of trees, can be arranged as singular structures or combined “just like Lego bricks.” Related: Long Lodge is an elegant and sustainable mass timber retreat proposal in the woods “The clustered column was divided into five segments,” the architects explained. “The bottom part of each clustered column is in the shape of a regular polygon. These extend upward from the bottom and form a square outside edge.” Further adding flexibility to the design, the expansive 17,000-square-foot interior is arranged in an open-plan layout that relies primarily on  natural light . The two stories include a multi-functional space on the ground floor that can be used for large events or sectioned off for smaller gatherings. The first floor is a mezzanine gallery protected by series of glass balustrades. On the upper level, the timber structures have table spaces that wrap around their width to provide space for work or play. + LUO Studio Via Dezeen Photography by Jin Weiqi via LUO Studio

View original here: 
Glass building in China is filled with soaring timber pillars in the shape of trees

Solar-powered cabin is designed for ultimate flexibility and mobility

December 11, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered cabin is designed for ultimate flexibility and mobility

Buenos Aires-based firm  IR Arquitectura  has created a brilliant modular cabin designed to offer not only exceptional flexibility, but also stellar energy efficiency. The cabin is made up of five distinct prefab modules that can be configured in various shapes. Equipped with a solar heating water system, a solar kitchen, a trombe wall and solar lamps, the sustainable cabin can operate completely off-grid in virtually any location. The cabin is built out of prefabricated modules that are manufactured off site and transported to the desired location. The cabin can be configured in a variety of shapes. Various sections of transparent cladding in the roof and on the walls allow natural light into the interior. Additionally, the cabin’s wide swinging doors provide a strong connection between the cabin and its surroundings. Related: This series of modular wood cabins form a rustic retreat in the Catskills The modules are each clad in a thermal and waterproof coating to add a strong resilience to the design , which can be installed in nearly any environment. For example, after recently serving as a central building in an outdoor summer camp in Hungary, the cabin’s modules were dismantled and loaded onto a truck to be used in its next location. According to the architects, the cabin was inspired by the need to provide inhabitants with the basic functions of storing, dressing, cooking, heating and resting. Clad in natural wood paneling and framework, the interior space is light and airy, with a notable minimalist appearance. Behind the simple design is an intricate, sustainable profile. The modules are installed with multiple clean energy features such as a solar heating water system , a solar kitchen, a trombe wall and Moser solar lamps . + IR Arquitectura Via Archdaily Photography by Bujnovsky Tamás via IR Arquitectura

Excerpt from:
Solar-powered cabin is designed for ultimate flexibility and mobility

LOT-EK upcycles 140 shipping containers into an apartment complex in South Africa

November 27, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on LOT-EK upcycles 140 shipping containers into an apartment complex in South Africa

A massive, modular residential building has risen in Johannesburg , South Africa with aims of revitalizing Maboneng Precinct, an area that’s recently undergone a dramatic transformation from a site of urban decay to a thriving enclave for creatives. Having extensive experience in cargotecture, New York- and Naples-based architectural design studio LOT-EK was tapped to design the mixed-use building, which was completed last year. Dubbed Drivelines Studio, the building comprises a total of 140 shipping containers and includes affordable housing as well as ground-floor retail. Located on a triangular site atop an existing single-story structure that used to house a car repair shop, Drivelines Studio includes seven floors with the top six levels comprising residential units, all of which are open-plan studios ranging in size from 300 square feet to 600 square feet and equipped with outdoor terraces with views of greenery below. The ground floor consists of retail along Albertina Sisulu Road, additional residential units in the rear and a private courtyard for residents with gardens and a pool. “Embracing the triangular geometry of the site, the building is conceived as a billboard where two separate volumes of residential units are hinged at the narrow east end of the lot, framing the social space of the open interior courtyard ,”  the firm explained in a project statement. “As in a billboard, the building outer facades are straight and flush with the lot line while the facades in the inner courtyard are articulated by the staircases, the elevator tower and the bridges connecting all levels, and by the open circulation paths activated by the units spillover onto their outdoor space.” Related: Repurposed shipping containers inject funky and unexpected color to a historic home renovation The upcycled shipping containers retain their original color and corrugated siding to reference their industrial past and to allude to the city’s reputation as the largest inland port in the world. The containers were stacked and cut on site with large diagonal cutouts for windows that give the building its distinctive, zigzagging facade pattern. + LOT-EK Photography by Dave Southwood via LOT-EK

The rest is here: 
LOT-EK upcycles 140 shipping containers into an apartment complex in South Africa

BIGs dramatic hillside apartments officially open in Stockholm

November 9, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on BIGs dramatic hillside apartments officially open in Stockholm

Bjarke Ingels Group has announced the official opening of the long-awaited 79&Park, a residential development with a striking, stepped design. Located in Stockholm’s Gärdet district, the sculptural complex consists of 169 foliage-covered apartments constructed from prefabricated 3.6-meter by 3.6-meter modules that are arranged around an open courtyard. The cascading design was developed to optimize access to natural light as well as views toward the city and Gärdet’s parklands. Inaugurated on the same day as OMA’s Norra Tornen — another spectacular structure and the tallest new building in the city — 79&Park occupies a prominent location bordering the city park. To tie the building into the urban fabric and adjacent nature, Bjarke Ingels Group crafted the building in the image of a gently sloping hillside and clad the exterior in vertical strips of cedar. An abundance of greenery has been incorporated as well, from the modular rooftop terraces to the lush central courtyard. “79&Park is conceived as an inhabitable landscape of cascading residences that combine the splendors of a suburban home with the qualities of urban living: the homes have private outdoor gardens and penthouse views of the city and Gärdet,” said Bjarke Ingels, founding partner at BIG. “The communal intimacy of the central urban oasis offers peace and tranquility while also giving the residents a feeling of belonging in the larger community of 79&Park. Seen from a distance, 79&Park appears like a man-made hillside in the center of Stockholm .” Related: BIG completes low-income “Homes for All” project in Copenhagen In addition to the 169 apartment units — nearly all of them have a unique layout — the development also houses commercial spaces open to the public on the ground floor. Resident amenities include a doggy daycare and preschool. Like the exterior, the Scandinavian design-inspired interiors were dressed in a natural material palette including white oak floors and natural stone. Large windows blur the boundary between the indoors and out. + BIG Photography by Laurian Ghinitoiu via BIG

See more here:
BIGs dramatic hillside apartments officially open in Stockholm

This eco-friendly prefab home was built in just 28 days

August 27, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This eco-friendly prefab home was built in just 28 days

São Paulo-based engineering and construction company SysHaus and Brazilian architecture firm Studio Arthur Casas have designed and installed the first-ever SysHaus, a modular family residence that features a wide array of eco-friendly features. Prefabricated from 100 percent  recyclable materials , the São Paulo house was constructed in just 28 days using proprietary technology that the designers say “doesn’t generate excess materials or utilize water.” The energy-saving elements of the house include a rainwater catchment and reuse system, solar roof tiles, a green roof and even a biodigester to turn organic waste into gas for the fireplace and kitchen. The chic and contemporary design of the SysHaus spans nearly 2,200 square feet. Since the single-family home was designed to embrace environmentally friendly principles both inside and out, the design and construction team enlisted the help of landscape designer Renata Tilli to direct the planting plans of the garden spaces. The lush landscape includes bamboo and grass, fast growing plants that require little maintenance and water. In contrast, Tilli also specified the inclusion of several olive trees, chosen for their slow-growing characteristics in a nod to the home’s longevity. Related: Beautiful cabin pops up in ten days with minimal landscape disturbance Architect Arthur Casas directed not only the architectural design of SysHaus, but also determined the interior furnishings and finishes of the prefab home. The cohesive design emphasizes a strong connection with nature thanks to its natural materials palette and large sliding doors that blur the boundary between the interior and exterior, which continues on to the outdoor landscaping and living spaces. The home features a sense of fluidity in the interior spaces, which feel interconnected. “Nature and design integration are key to this Brazilian Startup SysHaus’ and Studio Arthur Casas’ project,” the team said in a press release. “Using modular system manufacturing, project needs and specifications made its parts in a very efficient and functional mode.” + Studio Arthur Casas Images via Studio Arthur Casas

Read the original here:
This eco-friendly prefab home was built in just 28 days

Adorable prefab nursery in Greece mimics a tiny urban village

July 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Adorable prefab nursery in Greece mimics a tiny urban village

For design collective KLAB Architecture (Kinetic Lab of Architecture), one of the biggest challenges with public buildings in Greece is the lack of architect involvement in the construction process. To circumvent the problem, KLAB Architecture turned to prefabrication for its design of a public nursery in the Athens suburb of Glyfada. Drawing inspiration from a child’s archetypal drawing of a house, the modular gabled structures are clustered together to form the appearance of a tiny urban village. Organized around an open landscaped courtyard , the prefabricated nursery comprises a series of repeating modules of three differing sizes and shapes for visual interest. Each module was constructed in a factory and then transported via truck to the site for quick installation. The nursery follows a minimalist and modern aesthetic with its clean geometric lines and all-white exterior. Timber slatted pergolas provide shade and help mitigate solar gain; once they mature, planted shade trees will also help cool the buildings. Related: WeWork and BIG design innovative new school in NYC “We attempted to employ rather common materials and construction methods in order to create a more complicated structure with a small energy footprint,” KLAB Architecture said. “The exterior walls were constructed 10 centimeters thick, allowing us to maximize the available interior area, and were cladded, along with the roofs, with exterior wall insulation. Thus, by taking also into consideration the construction of wooden pergolas along the careful placement of the windows on the exterior walls, the building is sustainable providing comfort to the children.” Related: Lego-like kindergarten sparks creativity with a playful brick facade The energy-efficient nursery is also filled with natural light and warm natural materials to create a healthy and welcoming environment for the children. In contrast to the white exterior, the interior features bright and colorful wall treatments and furnishings that inject life into the various classrooms. All classrooms are open on three sides to engage the outdoors. + KLAB Architecture Via ArchDaily Images by Mariana Bisti

Read the original: 
Adorable prefab nursery in Greece mimics a tiny urban village

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 6041 access attempts in the last 7 days.