Chefs could be the missing ingredient to circular food systems

June 22, 2020 by  
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Chefs could be the missing ingredient to circular food systems Lauren Phipps Mon, 06/22/2020 – 01:00 It’s often said that the way to a person’s heart is through the stomach. The same principle could apply to fixing the broken food system.  Food loss and waste, the carbon-intensive production and distribution of food, hunger and food deserts: These are just a few inefficient and unequal outcomes of today’s global food system. The principles of a circular economy offer a helpful framework to envision a more resilient and regenerative alternative — and chefs might be the missing ingredient to successfully realizing a new model.  “When you talk about biodiversity and conservation, there is no value,” said prominent Brazilian chef Alex Atala, who runs the world-renowned restaurant D.O.M. in São Paulo. “When you taste biodiversity, there’s a new meaning and new value.”  Atala was one of four chefs tuning in from around the world who spoke about cultivating a circular economy for food during the Ellen MacArthur Foundation’s Big Food Workshop last week. According to these culinary leaders, we have to start with the food itself: the ingredients; the preparation; and the flavor.  Biodiversity, conservation and a shift towards regenerative agriculture is just one piece of a holistic vision for a better food system. The Ellen MacArthur Foundation breaks down circular food systems into three, bite-sized pieces in the report ” Cities and Circular Economy for Food “: Food production that improves rather than degrades the environment; ingredients kept at their highest value and cycled through the biological system; and people that have access to healthy and nutritious food.  It’s not enough to ask people to put something on the plate because it’s the right thing to do. We want people to enjoy it. The report’s analysis suggests that a successful shift not only would benefit the climate and communities, it also would generate $2.7 trillion in annual benefits by 2050. And chefs will play a vital role in driving this transformation.  Chef Kim Wejendorp knows a thing or two about food waste — or in his case, the inventive use of every ounce of an ingredient. Head of R&D at Amass Restaurant in Copenhagen, known for its fine dining and zero-waste kitchen, Wejendorp believes “it’s a matter of deriving flavor from otherwise byproducts or what would be considered waste in commercial kitchens. It’s not enough to ask people to put something on the plate because it’s the right thing to do. We want people to enjoy it. We want people to come back to these ingredients as things with their own intrinsic value.”  Wejendorp recognizes the impact of each ingredient, and the responsibility of the chef — in commercial and home kitchens — to actively avoid waste where possible. “Anybody looking down at a cutting board that’s about to sweep whatever they’ve got leftover in the bin, stop and ask yourself, ‘Have you done enough with what you have there to pay respect to the amount of work and effort and resources it took to get those ingredients in front of you in the first place?’” South African chef and writer Mokgadi Itsweng champions indigenous foods in future food systems. “We’re suffering from malnutrition … social diseases like diabetes, all these things that our great-grandparents never suffered from. The reason being, they ate a lot of the indigenous ingredients.” An unintended impact of urbanization in South Africa is shifting relationships with food. “When people move to cities, indigenous food knowledge is destroyed,” Itsweng said. Itsweng described the indigenous foods that she grew up eating such as sorghum, millet and amaranth. “I’m bringing them back into people’s kitchens. … With climate change, COVID and food insecurity, we need those nutrient-dense foods back on our plates.”  To revive indigenous food systems and cultures, Itsweng has one simple piece of advice: “Speak to your grandmother.” The foods and cooking methods used for generations can inform today’s efforts to improve the food system, and elders are an unparalleled resource to help communities relearn how to eat sustainably.  A well-known figure in the U.S. farm-to-table movement, Dan Barber has long advocated to support local farms and farmers. Author of “The Third Plate” and chef and co-owner of restaurants Blue Hill and Blue Hill at Stone Barns, Barber reflected on the shifting trajectory of food culture in the United States. “When I opened Blue Hill in very progressive New York City, I had to have foie gras, caviar, lobster — I had to have those ingredients on my menu. Fast-forward 20 years, those ingredients on my menu make me look old and outdated and anachronistic.” The plates have shifted. I love the Toni Cade Bambara quote, “The role of the artist is to make the revolution irresistible.” When it comes to the art of flavor and sustenance, this responsibility is no different. The role of the chef is to make a regenerative, circular food system tempting and delicious. To drive systems change through the allure of a perfectly prepared carrot rather than the threat of a stick.  “We as chefs are the strongest voice in the food chain in this moment,” Atala concluded. “We have a power, a power to transform a forgotten, an unknown, an undervalued ingredient into a sexy ingredient. Let’s use this power. Let’s feed people with love and maybe food can be a way to express it.” Pull Quote It’s not enough to ask people to put something on the plate because it’s the right thing to do. We want people to enjoy it. Topics Circular Economy Food Systems Food Waste Featured Column In the Loop Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off

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Chefs could be the missing ingredient to circular food systems

FOMO: Why I’m not going to Paris for COP21

November 17, 2015 by  
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Here’s why EMC’s Kathrin Winkler won’t be at the biggest U.N. climate event of the decade, despite the dreaded Fear of Missing Out.

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FOMO: Why I’m not going to Paris for COP21

Robots, fuel cells and a $1 billion bet: Inside Toyota’s Silicon Valley strategy

November 17, 2015 by  
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Artificial intelligence, shared transportation and micro-sized electric vehicles are at the heart of the Japanese automaker’s new push into auto technology.

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Robots, fuel cells and a $1 billion bet: Inside Toyota’s Silicon Valley strategy

Kanye West introduces clothing and shoe line with Adidas at Fashion Week

February 18, 2015 by  
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“The world can be saved through design,” Kanye West  said to Harvard students in 2013. Now, West is now partnering with Adidas to produce Yeezy; a collection of clothing and footwear that he describes as “solutions-based.” Unveiled in New York to celebrate the beginning of Fashion Week , the line is designed to make getting dressed less stressful altogether. Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Read the rest of Kanye West introduces clothing and shoe line with Adidas at Fashion Week Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Adidas , adidas shoes kanye , basic clothing , Kanye , Kanye West , kanye west adidas , kanye west fashion week , kanye west harvard , minimal materials , simple clothing , Yeezy , Yeezy Adidas , yeezy adidas clothing , yeezy adidas shoes , yeezy boots , Yeezy clothing , yeezy design , yeezy shirt

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Kanye West introduces clothing and shoe line with Adidas at Fashion Week

Foster + Partners debuts Apple store in China to usher in the Chinese New Year

February 18, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Foster + Partners debuts Apple store in China to usher in the Chinese New Year Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: apple store in china , china apple store design , chinese new year , Foster + Partners , Foster and Partners , retail stores in china

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Foster + Partners debuts Apple store in China to usher in the Chinese New Year

California just broke ground on the United States’ first high-speed rail!

January 6, 2015 by  
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California just broke ground in Fresno on the nation’s  first high-speed rail system , ushering in a new era of efficient, eco-friendly transportation. The railway will enable riders to travel faster than a Ferrari once it’s completed: at 220 miles an hour, a passenger will be able to travel from northern to southern California in just three hours. By 2029, the system will run from San Francisco to Los Angeles, and after that, the system will continue to Sacramento and San Diego, adding 24 stops to the rail. Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Read the rest of California just broke ground on the United States’ first high-speed rail! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: american high speed rail , California , california high speed rail , california high speed rail authority , california high speed railway authority , california high speed train , Diana Gomez , eco-travel , high speed rail , high-speed rail authority , high-speed rail California , highspeed rail , Kathy Omachi , rail , railway systems , upgraded railway systems

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California just broke ground on the United States’ first high-speed rail!

Toyota gives away more than 5,600 hydrogen fuel-cell patents, for free

January 6, 2015 by  
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Taking a page out of Tesla’s book , Toyota has announced that more than 5,600 of its fuel-cell-related patents are available for use—for free. Toyota hopes that its announcement at the 2015 Consumer Electronics Show will spur development and introduction of innovative fuel cell technologies around the world. Read the rest of Toyota gives away more than 5,600 hydrogen fuel-cell patents, for free Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 2015 CES , 2016 Mirai , ces , consumer electronics show , fuel cell , fuel cell vehicle , green car , green transportation , hydrogen , hydrogen fuel cell vehicle , patents , Toyota , Toyota Mirai

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Toyota gives away more than 5,600 hydrogen fuel-cell patents, for free

Autonomous Audi A7 Concept drives itself from the Silicon Valley to Las Vegas

January 6, 2015 by  
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Audi wants to showcase its autonomous driving technology at the upcoming  International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas in an effort to demonstrate the technology’s capabilities. To back up their tech, Audi recently let a team of journalists sit behind the wheel of an autonomous A7 concept that drove by itself from the Silicon Valley to Las Vegas—a total distance of more than 550 miles. Read the rest of Autonomous Audi A7 Concept drives itself from the Silicon Valley to Las Vegas Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 2015 Consumer Electronics show , AUDI , Audi A7 , Audi A7 autonomous concept , Audi A7 Concept , autonomous car , ces , consumer electronics show , green car , green transportation , self-driving car

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Autonomous Audi A7 Concept drives itself from the Silicon Valley to Las Vegas

The Tree House by Matt Fajkus Architecture is a light-filled family home in Texas

January 5, 2015 by  
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Matt Fajkus Architecture has created a bright, daylit home in Austin, Texas, and is centered around a huge oak tree on the property. Clad in stucco, the upper level is a floating white box that acts as a “treehouse” for the children’s rooms, while the main floor master suite opens out into an enclosed courtyard, which can be used for social gatherings as well as personal use. An enormous, 2-storey window wall allows natural daylight to pour into the home; its light-colored interiors help to diffuse the light throughout, giving the sense that it’s much larger than it appears. The oak tree that is so integral to the home is easily seen from many angles, and the dappled light created by its leaves create interesting effects, both inside and out. + Tree House by Matt Fajkus Architecture Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: dappled light , Daylighting , Matt Fajkus Architecture , MF Architecture , oak , oak tree , oak tree house , texas , texas tree house , tree house , treehouse

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The Tree House by Matt Fajkus Architecture is a light-filled family home in Texas

INTERVIEW: Bamboo builder, and Ibuku Founder Elora Hardy on Creating Incredible Green Buildings with Bamboo

December 31, 2014 by  
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We’ve showcased numerous bamboo designs over the years, from furniture to entire buildings, but when it comes to combining green building and renewable materials, Ibuku’s incredible bent-bamboo buildings take the cake. The Bali-based bamboo building team already has luxury villas, houses, schools and infrastructure buildings in their portfolio, and is renowned for their dedication to using traditional Indonesian building techniques . We spoke with the firm’s founder and CEO, designer Elora Hardy, about vernacular architecture traditions, her involvement with designing bamboo buildings , and the reasons behind her vocational change from high-end fashion to sustainable architecture Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Missing Attachment Read the rest of INTERVIEW: Bamboo builder, and Ibuku Founder Elora Hardy on Creating Incredible Green Buildings with Bamboo Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , Bali , Bali architecture , Bali bamboo , Balinese , Balinese bamboo , bamboo , bamboo architecture , bamboo building , bamboo design , bamboo green school , bamboo villas , Elora , Elora Hardy , green school , Hardy Green School , Ibuku bamboo , Ibuku interview , renewable building material , renewable material , sustainable bamboo , sustainable building material

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INTERVIEW: Bamboo builder, and Ibuku Founder Elora Hardy on Creating Incredible Green Buildings with Bamboo

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