100% recyclable materials make up these low-impact monastery huts in Italy

June 16, 2017 by  
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Edoardo Milesi & Archos designed a series of minimalist monastery guesthouses that reflect the monastics’ ascetic lifestyle in the Siloe community. Located in the province of Grosseto in central Italy, these huts are built entirely of recyclable materials and are elevated off the ground to ensure low impact on the beautiful rural landscape. The Monastery Complex of Siloe comprises five guesthouse units set outside monastery grounds against a hilly backdrop crisscrossed with trails. Each guesthouse was carefully sited on the landscape to minimize site disturbance . The buildings are elevated on stilts to mitigate uneven terrain. Only recyclable materials were used in construction, including timber used for the roofs, lofts, and walls, to the ventilated covering made of zinc and titanium. External cladding, floors, doors, and window trim are built of naturally oxidized larch. Related: Plastic waste pop-up pavilion rethinks recycling in the Netherlands Approximately 33 square meters in size, each guesthouse comprises a bedroom; bathroom; open-plan living room with a dining area and kitchenette; a north-facing balcony; and a south-facing loggia . The windows are located on the north and west sides to create diffused lighting indoors, while the south side is mostly closed off and equipped with eaves to protect against solar heat gain. + Edoardo Milesi & Archos Via domus Images by Aurelio Candido

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100% recyclable materials make up these low-impact monastery huts in Italy

Award-winning Boulder Cabin minimizes energy use and material waste

February 24, 2017 by  
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Boulder’s reputation as an environmental leader is upheld in this eco-friendly home overlooking views of the metropolitan Denver valley. Jackson-based firm Dynia Architects completed Boulder Cabin, a contemporary home with an emphasis on sustainability. Clad in weathering steel and lined with timber, the modern cabin sits lightly on the land to minimize site impact. Winner of a 2011 AIA Wyoming Merit Award, the 2,500-square-foot Boulder Cabin is modern and minimalist to match the “disciplined lifestyle of the owners.” The site-specific design is optimized for solar and panoramic views. To the east, clerestory windows let in early morning light, while the west facade is punctuated with nearly full-height windows to frame the best views of the iconic Flatiron peaks. The roof extends over the west wall to protect against solar heat gain and glare. The home opens up on the south side to a shaded outdoor terrace. Related: Affordable Boulder is a tiny mobile home that’s big on contemporary style To minimize site impact , the Boulder cabin was built with a size well below the allowable area. Any landscape that was disturbed during excavation and construction was quickly revegetated. The limited materials palette of timber, concrete, and weathered steel cladding minimize material waste and help the home blend in with its surroundings. + Dynia Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Ron Johnson

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Award-winning Boulder Cabin minimizes energy use and material waste

Beautiful lakeside cabin puts a fresh spin on the traditional Finnish log cabin

August 12, 2016 by  
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Nestled within a high latitude pine forest, Cabin K blends into its surroundings with a timber facade. Following the example of traditional Finnish cabins, the architects built the gabled Cabin K using pine logs and treated the exterior with iron oxide to accelerate the natural graying of the wood. Vertical strips of pine clad the exterior to protect the logs from the elements. A small pine deck is set above a rocky ledge to overlook views of the lake and extend the cabin’s interior into the landscape. Related: Green-roofed cabin is a stunning cantilevered retreat accessible only by boat Despite the cabin’s traditional outward appearance, the interior is surprisingly spacious and light-filled. Large windows on the north and south sides pull natural light into the building to illuminate a double-height living room and a treehouse-like loft. Untreated pine logs are used for the walls, floors, and bare roof rafters. “The design combines old ways with new technologies,” write the architects. “The gable roof form and log walls are common in Finnish cabins, while the details, volume, and quality of light are unexpected.” + Studio Kamppari Via Dezeen Images via Studio Kamppari

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Beautiful lakeside cabin puts a fresh spin on the traditional Finnish log cabin

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