An updated Scandinavian summer cottage weaves Japanese influences throughout

July 18, 2018 by  
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There are few better places to spend a Scandinavian summer than in a breezy cottage by the water. One stellar example is the Summer House completed by Swedish architecture firm Kod Arkitekter in the northern Stockholm archipelago. Located on an island and surrounded by the forest and sea, this home makes the most of its idyllic surroundings with a design that maximizes indoor-outdoor living and combines Scandinavian cottage traditions with Japanese minimalism. Built of timber to reference the surrounding forest, the Summer House comprises a renovated old cottage and a new addition. The clients asked Kod Arkitekter to save and update the cottage — a 65-square-meter structure — and seamlessly integrate it into the extension , a long volume that stretches perpendicular to the existing building. To connect the two buildings, the architects clad both volumes in vertical stained strips of lumber and also topped the house with a dark roofing material. The roof extends over the outdoor patio so that it can be enjoyed rain or shine. Related: Timber-clad waterfront house in Norway epitomizes modern Scandinavian design “With its elongated shape, window setting and the location of the rooms and the patios , the design maximizes the outlook on the water and the unspoiled nature,” explained Kod Arkitekter of the 210-square-meter cottage. “In addition to the Scandinavian traditions, the house draws inspiration from Japan , in an interpretation where simplicity, wood and the relationship with the surrounding nature are at the heart of the architecture.” To mitigate the sloping site, the west end of the T-shaped house is partially elevated on steel posts. The private rooms can be found in the home’s north and south wings. The common areas are located in the west wing, which faces views of the water. Framed by large windows, the communal spaces connect to the outdoors for an indoor-outdoor living experience. + Kod Arkitekter Images via Måns Berg

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An updated Scandinavian summer cottage weaves Japanese influences throughout

A former ski lift station takes on new life as a bold mountain lodge

July 12, 2018 by  
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A small mountain lodge has replaced an old ski lift station on the Krkonoše mountains in the Czech Republic. Czech studio ADR designed the ?erná Voda, named after a nearby stream, to serve as a place of respite for short-term guests of a nearby lodge’s owner. The isolated retreat stands in a meadow apart from the Horní Malá Úpa village, among tall trees and lush shrubbery that shroud the cabin in serenity. Stepping inside the ?erná Voda, guests will find a bright, minimalist design. Light timber, which covers the walls, floors and ceilings, creates an open, airy feel. The kitchen space offers a sharp contrast with blackened wood cabinetry. The simple interior draws focus to the large windows and their picturesque views of the mountains , including Sn?žka, the highest mountain peak in the country. One window opens to the outdoors and allows a breath of fresh air into the cabin. Upstairs, a sleeping loft outfitted with protective netting offers a quiet space for visitors to rest. As natural light filters into the ground floor at daybreak, the loft benefits from the pitched ceiling and retains some darkness for guests who prefer to sleep in. During cooler months, a small wood-burning stove keeps the cabin toasty and inviting after a long day of exploring the outdoors. The mountain lodge blends into its forested surroundings in the summer with its dark metal and blackened wood cladding. When the landscape becomes blanketed in snow, the gabled cabin stands out boldly in its environment. On the west end of the home, a deck extends the living areas to the outdoors. The ?erná Voda mountain lodge has been nominated for a 2018 Czech Architecture Award , which promotes projects that embrace the public and the environment by both new and seasoned architects. + ADR Images via Jakub Skokan and Martin T?ma / BoysPlayNice

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A former ski lift station takes on new life as a bold mountain lodge

Century-old Japanese townhouse reborn as Blue Bottle Coffees first Kyoto location

June 6, 2018 by  
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Japanese architecture firm Schemata Architects has unveiled Blue Bottle Coffee’s first outpost in Kyoto  – and it’s housed in a century-old building. Following the aesthetic of the previous Schemata-designed Blue Bottle cafes in Tokyo, the newest location features a minimalist and modern design that takes inspiration from the surrounding urban fabric. The two-story structure was carefully overhauled to allow for new functionality while preserving and exposing historic elements. Completed in March this year, the Blue Bottle Coffee Kyoto Cafe is located near the base of Kyoto’s forested Higashiyama mountains and along the approach to Nanzen-ji Temple, a Zen Buddhist temple and one of the historic city’s top tourist attractions. The cafe was built inside a traditional Japanese townhouse (known as ‘machiya’) consisting of two separate buildings. Schemata Architects renovated the buildings into a ‘Merchandise building’ and a ‘Cafe building’ with a total floor area of nearly 3,500 square feet. As was typical of traditional Japanese architecture at the turn of the 20th century, the original floors of the machiya were raised nearly 20 inches off the ground. To create a seamless appearance and to accommodate patrons with special mobility needs, the Blue Bottle Cafe’s architects demolished the raised wooden floors and made them level with the ground. The new floors feature terrazzo containing the same type of pebbles used outside. The same terrazzo material was also used in the counters and benches. Related: Tokyo capsule hotel gets a Finnish-inspired refresh and sauna “The floor inside the counter is also level with the customer area to maintain the same eye level between customers and staff following the same concept as the other shops, while integrating Japanese and American cultures at the same time,” said the architects. “The continuous white floor is stripped of all unnecessary things and the structure is stripped of existing finishes to expose the original roof structure and clay walls, and one can see traces of its 100-year old history throughout the large, medium and small spaces in the structure originally composed of two separate buildings.” The second floor has been converted into an open-plan office with glass frontage. + Schemata Architects Images by Takumi Ota

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Century-old Japanese townhouse reborn as Blue Bottle Coffees first Kyoto location

This bold ship-inspired tiny house has a surprising minimalist interior

May 11, 2018 by  
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Designed by Brian and Joni Buzarde, the Land Ark RV is a tiny home on wheels that’s geared toward adventurers who prefer to travel in style. Not only does the RV’s design include a contemporary and sophisticated all-black corrugated metal exterior, but the interior boasts a well-lit living space, complete with all of the comforts of home. The sleek silhouette of the beautiful RV is inspired by the symmetrical front elevation often found in ship design. The sloped roof appears steeper from different angles, creating a sense of movement even when the tiny home is stationary. Related: Timber cabin on wheels lets you hit the open road in luxurious comfort In contrast to the sleek, all-black exterior, the interior is a light-filled oasis of strategic design. Clad in natural pinewood panels, the living space is large and airy. The kitchen and living room are subtly integrated, sharing a long shelf that pulls double duty as a dining area or office desk. A large sleeping loft is accessible by ladder and lit by various windows. For extra space on the ground floor, an additional “flex room” can fit a queen size bed or serve as an office. The tiny home ‘s bathroom, which comes with a 30 x 60 inch tub and Kohler features, is compact but has a long pine ledge to create plenty of shelf space. There are also several linen and storage nooks to help deter clutter. + Land Ark RV Via Dwell Photography by Jeremy Gudac via Land Ark RV

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This bold ship-inspired tiny house has a surprising minimalist interior

France could ban stores from tossing out unsold clothing

May 11, 2018 by  
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Earlier this year a viral Facebook photo of a clothing store in France destroying apparel sparked outrage — and Paris-based group Emmaus got involved. The organization working to end homelessness started tackling the clothing dilemma, and a recent Circular Economy Roadmap from the government proposes a solution: banning stores from chucking unsold clothes . (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = ‘https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v3.0’; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’)); Exposition de la poubelle de Celio, rue du Gros Horloge à Rouen. (Artiste inconnu).Celio jette ses vêtements … Posted by Nathalie Beauval on  Saturday, February 3, 2018 France’s Circular Economy Roadmap calls for applying the main principles of the food waste battle to the clothing industry by 2019; a 2016 law requires grocery stores to donate food instead of throwing it away. The government said in the roadmap they aim to ensure unsold textiles “are neither discarded nor eliminated.” So France could prohibit stores from trashing clothing that isn’t sold. Clothing stores might have to donate unsold wares instead. Related: This Swedish power plant is burning H&M clothes instead of fossil fuels Emmaus deputy director general Valérie Fayard told local research company Novethic while the details aren’t clear yet, as this is a roadmap presentation, it’s still good news. She said, “The deadline of 2019 will allow the government to launch an inventory of the situation, calculate the number of tonnages discarded, the processes put in place by brands, and difficulties.” Prime Minister Édouard Philippe said by 2019, roadmap measures could be translated into legislation, according to Fashion Network . Europe ditches four million tons of clothing every year, according to Fashion Network. Meanwhile, five million tons are placed on the market. France is one of Europe’s biggest fashion markets — but they throw away 700,000 tons of clothing per year and only recycle 160,000 tons. Green Matters said France was “the first country to pass a law” preventing supermarkets and grocery stores from tossing out food nearing expiration. + Circular Economy Roadmap Via Novethic , Green Matters , My Modern Met , and Fashion Network Images via Alp Allen Altiner on Unsplash and Cam Morin on Unsplash

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France could ban stores from tossing out unsold clothing

MUJIs $26k prefab huts are finally available for sale

November 7, 2017 by  
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The wait is over— MUJI’s microhomes are now officially on sale to the public. Ever since MUJI debuted their line of tiny prefabricated homes in 2015, fans of the minimalist design brand have eagerly awaited the chance to get their hands on one of their tiny prefabricated homes, called MUJI Huts , starting at a little over $26,000 USD. Per MUJI’s famous minimalist aesthetic, the MUJI Huts are elegant and understated. Timber surfaces and a light-tone color palette creates a cozy and welcoming character. The first MUJI Hut to hit the market is a compact 9-square-meter cabin clad in blackened timber and lined in domestic fir wood. Sliding glass doors let in ample natural light and open up to a small covered patio. The simplicity of the design makes it easy for the microhome to adapt to variety of environments and uses. Related: MUJI to sell eagerly awaited $27k minimalist tiny homes this fall Base pricing for the MUJI Hut starts at 3 million yen (approximately $26,340 USD), tax and construction costs included. Insulation and electrical outlets are optional add-ons. Unfortunately, MUJI Hut is presently only available for sale in Japan—lucky residents can order a microhome from MUJI’s global flagship store at Yurakucho —but fans of the microhome are always welcome to test drive a MUJI Hut at the MUJI Camp in Tsumagoi , about an hour out of Tokyo via bullet train. + MUJI Hut Via SoraNews24

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MUJIs $26k prefab huts are finally available for sale

How a Minimalist Lifestyle Can Add to Your Green Efforts

October 16, 2017 by  
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You may have seen the term “minimalism” being thrown around … The post How a Minimalist Lifestyle Can Add to Your Green Efforts appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Dark unused garage is transformed into a cozy light-filled studio in San Francisco

July 31, 2017 by  
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The garage is the last place most people want to cozy up in, but that’s not so for the lucky owners of this beautiful garage-turned-studio space in San Francisco. Local architect Beverly Choe transformed an old, unused garage into the Clifford Studio, a dreamy, light-filled work studio and reading nook. Filled with suffused light and lined with timber, this adaptive reuse project is the perfect cozy hideout brought to life with minimalist decor with splashes of greenery and warm textures. The architect reimagined the garage, formerly a carriage house, as a “box for suffused light” painted shades of blue on the outside. A long skylight spans most of the building and natural light is filtered through the exposed beams that help minimize glare. Large glazed openings at the front and back of the studio let in more natural light and frame views of the outdoor sunken courtyard and garden. Board-formed concrete planters along the western and eastern sides of the courtyard relate to the timber-lined interior, creating a natural outdoor extension of the studio. The courtyard’s sunken profile also helps make the building appear taller. Related: Small and windowless garage in Lisbon transformed into an elegant modern loft Completed over the course of a year-and-a-half, the converted garage makes the most of a small space with the solid oak casework that forms walls of shelves, furnishings, and hidden storage. A blue-tiled bathroom is hidden off on the side of the oak paneling. The minimalist interior is open and airy and allows for flexibility of use, from a reading room to artist’s work studio. The architect treated natural light as a crucial material in the design process. + Beverly Choe Via Dwell Images by Mariko Reed

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Dark unused garage is transformed into a cozy light-filled studio in San Francisco

Super skinny Horinouchi House might be the most efficient use of space ever

August 1, 2016 by  
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Triangular-shaped structures are not uncommon in Japan since space on the island is very limited. Although they look tiny and restricted on the outside, these homes are often incredibly spacious, and the double story Horinouchi house is no exception. The open plan lower level is reserved for private rooms and the kitchen, while the upper level is used communally. With windows flanking each end of the home and skylights cut out of the angled roof, every inch of the minimalist abode is penetrated with daylight. Space is becoming one of the world’s most coveted commodities, but if we all lived with a little more Japanese efficiency, there would be more to go around! + Mizuishi Architect Atelier all images © hiroshi tanigawa

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Super skinny Horinouchi House might be the most efficient use of space ever

The Slice by Saunders Architecture is a tiny cabin that’s built around three existing plum trees

May 25, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of The Slice by Saunders Architecture is a tiny cabin that’s built around three existing plum trees Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: backyard studio , Canadian architect , deck , guest house , minimalist , monochrome , norway , saunders architecture , Scandinavian design , The Slice , tiny cabin , tiny home , Todd Saunders , triangle , triangular building

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The Slice by Saunders Architecture is a tiny cabin that’s built around three existing plum trees

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