Jet black lakeside home in the Netherlands designed to embrace the surrounding nature

January 18, 2019 by  
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Located just south of Amsterdam, the Vinkeveense Plassen is known for its incredible lakes and surrounding nature. When one family approached Dutch firm, i29 Interior Architects and Chris Collaris to build a home in the idyllic area, the designers created a beautiful 592-square-foot home strategically designed to embrace the incredible natural surroundings. Situated on a elongated island plot next to the lake, the home was designed with an inside-out strategy to make the most out of the limited square footage. The compact building lot enabled the architects to create a plan that would both reduce the project’s footprint and make the home more energy efficient. Working within those parameters, the designers chose a layout that includes four modules that house the living room,  kitchen/dining room, three bedrooms and one bathroom. A central, open-air patio connects the separate living spaces and creates a strong link with the exterior. Related: Curvaceous geothermal-powered home “floats” on a French lake The orientation of the home was at the forefront of the design. Being so close to the water, the architects wanted to make the most of the views and the natural sunlight . By dividing the home into four modules, the home was able to take advantage of the panoramic views and natural sunlight, reducing the home’s energy use in the process. The exterior of the home is clad in jet black timber panels , blending the home into the heavily forested lot. Large windows were embedded into the wooden facade to enhance the design’s minimalist feel. The landscaping around the home includes a lot of large trees that provide natural shade, and a lovely open air deck provides space for entertaining or dining al fresco. In contrast to its all-black exterior, the interior of the home is bright and airy. Large sliding glass doors and various windows allow natural light to flood the living spaces. Each volume has a distinct height and dimension, so the interior spaces are clearly defined. All white walls with light wooden hue accents and minimal Scandanavian-inspired furnishings give the space a fresh, modern aesthetic . + i29 Interior Architects + Chris Collaris Architects Via Archdaily Photography by Ewout Huibers  

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Jet black lakeside home in the Netherlands designed to embrace the surrounding nature

This amazing ‘Swiss Army’ tiny house has furniture folded inside its walls

January 24, 2018 by  
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Making tiny spaces livable is a complex process, but innovative space-saving features can yield amazing results. Italian architect Leonardo Di Chiara converted a 96-square-foot structure on wheels into the aVoid House – a small-space wonder with collapsible furniture that folds into its walls when not in use. The aVoid House is a collaboration between the architect and Tinyhouse University. With just 96 square feet, the tiny space houses all the basics of a home, but it’s geared to those wanting to reduce their clutter. All of the home’s furnishings are concealed behind the walls when not in use. The home’s bed, dining table, chairs, kitchenette, storage, a ladder to access the roof deck can all be put away to open up more room when needed. Related: Tiny 86-Square-Foot Flat in Paris Transforms Like a Swiss Army Knife “The tiny house is like a short instruction manual to reductionism,” said Di Chiara. “By itself, it teaches and pushes you to deprive yourself of unnecessary things, to consume less water and less energy, to put back your clothes in their place and to wash the dishes immediately after eating. The void, which is obtained by closing again all the wall-mounted furniture, is the refuge of my creativity.” Di Chiara believes that this new style of compact, transportable homes can help cities deal with urban housing issues . Although the entrance is a transparent doorway, the aVOID tiny home doesn’t have any side windows. This is because it is essentially a row home designed to be placed alongside other houses. The architect believes that small, minimalist homes can offer a strategic housing option for urban areas – and he also envisions “migratory neighborhoods” where people can live in different houses. + Leonardo Di Chiara Images via Leonardo Di Chiara

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This amazing ‘Swiss Army’ tiny house has furniture folded inside its walls

London to combat plastic waste with network of bottle refill points and fountains

January 24, 2018 by  
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London is taking a swing at plastic waste with moves that offer alternatives to plastic water bottles . Instead of buying another container that could end up in a landfill or the ocean , people in the city could use a drinking fountain or refill reusable bottles under a new scheme. The Guardian reports London aims to install 20 new drinking fountains and launch a bottle refill initiative. The Guardian said mayor Sadiq Khan hopes to tackle the plastic problem with a three-year, £750,000 (around $1,048,395) initiative slated to go before the budget committee of the London Assembly later this week. The drinking fountains and refill effort are part of the initiative, as is a move to stop offering plastic utensils, cups, and bottles at City Hall. Related: The world’s population buys one million plastic bottles every single minute The 20 drinking fountains will be put in place beginning this summer; locations haven’t yet been confirmed but deputy mayor for the environment Shirely Rodrigues told The Guardian that potential sites include bustling shopping areas like Oxford Street or Transport for London’s tube stations. More drinking fountains are also under consideration. The Guardian recently published an investigation revealing disparities in the provision of fountains in the city’s boroughs – some areas, like Barnet and Sutton, reportedly don’t have any at all. Under the bottle refill initiative, set to commence in five areas (yet to be announced) in February and March, businesses would make tap water available to the public. They will be able to locate places providing free tap water via window signs or an app. If the effort is successful, it could launch in the rest of London this summer. One movement working with the mayor is the Zoological Society of London-led #OneLess campaign . They will be supplying fountains and will scrutinize whether or not the moves do reduce the amount of plastic that ends up in the environment. According to #OneLess, “Londoners are among the highest users of bottled water in the UK. The average London adult buys 3.37 plastic water bottles every week – that’s 175 every year per person, and over a billion per year on a city level. Sadly, many of these end up in the River Thames and flow out to the ocean.” Via The Guardian Images via Depositphotos ( 1 , 2 )

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London to combat plastic waste with network of bottle refill points and fountains

Bro Ole Scheeren completes art museum near Beijings Forbidden City

January 24, 2018 by  
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Büro Ole Scheeren recently completed Guardian Art Center, a contemporary art museum heralded as the “world’s first ever custom-built auction house.” Located close to Beijing’s historic Forbidden City, this hybrid cultural institution offers mixed-use programming from galleries and conservation facilities to a hotel, restaurants, events spaces, and even integrated public transport infrastructure. Designed to respect Beijing’s traditional urban fabric, Guardian Art Center comprises a series of nested gray basalt stone volumes at its base that echo the scale and materiality of the nearby hutong courtyard houses. The stone volumes are perforated with a varying circular pattern that lets in natural light and glows at night. A “floating glass ring” rests atop the stone base and is clad in a brick-patterned glass facade. “The Guardian Art Center is a lot more than just a museum ,” says Ole Scheeren, principal of Büro Ole Scheeren. “It’s not a hermetic institution, but rather an acknowledgement of the hybrid state of contemporary culture. It is a Chinese puzzle of interlocking cultural spaces and public functions that fuse art and culture with events and lifestyle.” Scheeren adds that the materials share symbolic value with the brick referring to the common people and adjacent hutongs, while the glass references the contemporary city. Related: Ole Scheeren unveils designs for a stunning “sky forest” in Vietnam The building occupies prime location at the intersection of Wangfujing, Beijing’s most famous shopping street, and Wusi Davie, and also sits opposite the National Art Museum of China. Given the site’s historical significance as the place where China’s New Cultural Movement originated, the designs for Guardian Art Center took two decades before passing approval by the Beijing planning bureau and preservation commission. In addition to its ties to both modern and historic design, the large structure can adapt to multiple uses thanks to moveable partitions and ceiling systems that allow for different interior configurations. + Büro Ole Scheeren Images by Buro OS and Iwan Baan

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Bro Ole Scheeren completes art museum near Beijings Forbidden City

30-foot camper transformed into a nomadic haven with a surprisingly swanky interior

July 6, 2017 by  
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The “ Wander in the West ” crew, a five-person team that is currently traveling through the American West, turned this 30-foot camper van into a swanky home on wheels. Although the exterior was kept in its almost-original state, the interior was transformed into a sophisticated nomadic haven, perfect for experiencing life on the open road. The Winnhaven will be a comfy place to call home as the adventurous crew travel 8,700 miles through the American West. Designed to be a comfortable ride for the team, the space was strategically converted into a home on wheels thanks to collaboration from some incredibly swanky home decor and DIY brands. Related: Italian woman restores old van to travel the world with her rescue dog To revamp the living space into a cozy communal area, the team focused on creating a bright, cabin-like interior. Various seating options are available for socializing or working. Most of the walls are painted a stark white to open up the space, but there are quite a few warm touches such as the hardwood flooring and sliding bedroom door, which was covered in peel-and-stick wooden wall panels. The kitchen, although compact, was equipped with sufficient counter space and a beautiful copper sink from Sinkology , who also provided the copper basin in the tiny bathroom . The camper has a number of beds that are covered in colorful textiles influenced by the American West. Additional touches such as hanging plants and soft blankets make the Winnhaven an ideal place for team’s ongoing, on-the-road adventure. + Wander in the West + Everywhere Goods

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30-foot camper transformed into a nomadic haven with a surprisingly swanky interior

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