A pair of monochromatic cottages are tucked into the idyllic Canadian forestscape

May 13, 2019 by  
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An idyllic forestscape setting that lies deep within the Canadian wilderness has inspired Montreal-based firm Appareil Architecture to build a vacation home in the form of two jet-black, pitched-roofed cabins. The Grand-Pic Chalet is actually made up of two monochromatic cottages separated by a connecting wooden deck, which allows the beautiful family home to sit in serene harmony with the surrounding nature. When the homeowners tasked the Canadian firm to create a cabin that would be a welcoming space to host family and friends, the design team was immediately inspired by the building site. Surrounded by soaring evergreen trees and a rolling landscape, the designers were drawn to create a welcoming but sophisticated space that enjoys a strong connection between the home and the forest . Related: The Little House clad in black cedar is nestled among Washington’s evergreens The house is a total of 1,464 square feet separated into two cabins. The main cottage contains the living room and open kitchen area, while the smaller cabin is used as a guest house. In contrast to the black exteriors, the interiors are clad in light Russian plywood panels. The open layout is perfect for socializing, either with a large party or small family gathering. A series of tall, slender windows let optimal natural light into the interior living spaces as well as provide stunning views of the forestscape. Taking inspiration from Nordic traditions, the minimalist interior design is comprised of a neutral color palette and sparse contemporary furnishings. A simple wood-burning chimney sits in the corner to keep the living space warm and cozy. Meanwhile, the core of the design is the open kitchen, which features a large island with bar stool seating — the perfect space for catching up with friends and family. + APPAREIL Architecture Via Archdaily Photography by Félix Michaud via APPAREIL Architecture

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A pair of monochromatic cottages are tucked into the idyllic Canadian forestscape

MUJI to sell eagerly awaited $27k minimalist tiny homes this fall

April 25, 2017 by  
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If you’ve ever walked into a MUJI store and wished you could spend the night, here’s the next best thing. The minimalist Japanese home goods store just announced plans to sell a lovely line tiny homes later this year. The first model available for purchase will be a tiny timber cabin wrapped in “shou sugi ban” charred timber – and it’ll cost just $27,500. Muji’s tiny timber huts measure just under 100 square feet. Thanks to a clever layout, they offer tons of natural light and a simple interior ideal for a quiet weekend escape or a permanent home in the countryside. The cabins also come with an extended porch that creates a seamless connection between the exterior and interior. Related: MUJI unveils trio of tiny prefab homes that can pop up almost anywhere The good news is that beautiful cabins will hit the market for just ¥3,000,000 (approx. $27,500 USD) starting this fall. The price includes the costs of materials needed for construction as well as contractor fees. The bad news? The MUJI Huts will only be available for purchase in Japan for the time being. + MUJI

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MUJI to sell eagerly awaited $27k minimalist tiny homes this fall

Architect rebuilds his grandparents’ mountain cabin by repurposing its original materials

March 27, 2017 by  
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Architecture passed down from one generation to the next never goes out of style. Architect Jon Danielsen Aarhus is the fourth generation of his family to build a cabin on the jagged terrain that covers the Norweigan region of Ustaoset. Aarhus built the beautiful pine-clad cabin using traditional construction methods with repurposed materials from his grandparents’ cabin, which was originally built on the same site in the 1960s. Ustaoset is 3,500 feet above sea level, with a topography that is not at all construction friendly. Although the architect reused as much material as possible from his grandparents’ 50-year-old wooden cabin , al new construction materials had to be flown in by helicopter or snow scooter during the winter months. Related: Norwegian cabin weathers a harsh climate for breathtaking views The new cabin is built on the same location in order to reduce the new structure’s footprint as much as possible. The materials reused in the new design include the outside stairs and bench, which is made out of prior building’s old floorboards. Old stones taken from the original cabin’s foundation were repurposed as paving that leads up to the entrance. As for the remaining materials, the architect has plans to use them to build an outhouse in the future. To make the building site-specific, the design of the new cabin had to be resilient to the severe climate that includes strong winds and icy snow. Using the old cabin’s tried and true layout, the architect kept the original shape of the building by implementing traditional building methods, but added modern features such as solar protected glass panels. The large windows not only insulate the home and offer natural dayligh t on the interior, but provide jaw-dropping views of the Hallingskarvet mountain range, the Hardangerjøkulen glacier, and Lake Ustevann. As for the immediate landscape, Aarhus did the groundwork himself, forgoing heavy machinery for a shovel and wheelbarrow in order to protect the indigenous vegetation that grows in the high altitude. + Jon Danielsen Aarhus Photography by Knut Bry

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Architect rebuilds his grandparents’ mountain cabin by repurposing its original materials

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