A micro home in one of Quebecs regional parks offers a unique way to enjoy the outdoors

April 9, 2019 by  
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La Pointe is located within Canada’s Poisson Blanc Regional Park, and it’s a nature-loving minimalist’s dream come true. The micro home gets its name from the distinctive triangular geometry that comes to a cathedral-style point in the roof. The designers at Atelier L’abri wanted to honor the A-frame style that was made popular in North America in the 1950s while still providing the essential functions needed in a forest cabin. La Pointe offers off-the-grid living that isn’t completely isolated from civilization. The micro home is located off of a nature trail about 10 minutes by foot from the park’s reception pavilion. Despite the minimal square footage, there is room for up to four occupants inside thanks to the first-floor table’s ability to convert into an extra bed. Related: Disconnect in these A-frame tiny cabins in the Catskills The structure was built on-site and features a kitchenette, an outdoor porch area and a lofted bedroom accessible by ladder. The bed is suspended mezzanine-style using steel rods, and it calmly overlooks the rest of the home. The entire space, including the sleeping area, takes full advantage of the natural light that streams in during the day. The connecting covered terrace is the perfect spot to enjoy the space when the weather is hot, and the wood-burning stove keeps the house warm in the cold Canadian winters. The whole structure is raised off the ground to prevent weather-related damage from both the snow and the nearby reservoir. The exterior, made from natural cedar boards, creates a woodsy look that blends in beautifully to the surrounding forest landscape. The roof is made from steel, a recycle-friendly option for a building material. The interior uses the same cedar, which — combined with the dark, steel-colored appliances inside — creates an organic and raw look. Occupants can enjoy the forest views from the large bay window that centers the home from the first floor. + Atelier L’abri Photography by Jack Jérôme via Atelier L’abri

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A micro home in one of Quebecs regional parks offers a unique way to enjoy the outdoors

9 sustainable living tips to take from our grandparents

January 7, 2019 by  
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Our grandparents and great-grandparents lived in a simpler time, and we aren’t just talking about technology . During the Great Depression, many rural areas didn’t have running water or electricity, and things like proper refrigeration, freezers and air conditioning were a luxury. What’s more, big-box chains and massive supermarkets didn’t exist, and you didn’t have the option of throwing a pre-packaged meal into a microwave or hitting a drive-thru for lunch. Many modern conveniences are great, and in many ways, living in 2019 is much more enjoyable than 1935. But there are a lot of things we can learn from older generations to help live a more sustainable life. Here are some things our grandparents and great-grandparents did to live a simpler life that was a lot more eco-friendly. Make meals from scratch For the first time in American history, people are eating at restaurants more than they are cooking at home . In 2016, sales in restaurants passed grocery sales, meaning that people are spending more on eating out than eating in. Cooking from scratch is starting to become a skill that fewer and fewer of us know how to do, and that is resulting in people not knowing where their food comes from or how it was prepared. Related: 10 tasty and easy vegan dinner ideas Not only is cooking a survival skill that everyone should have, but preparing food at home makes you more self-sufficient, and it leads to a healthier diet. Plus, it saves your family a ton of cash, and it is much more environmentally friendly. You will use less packaging when you buy fresh ingredients, and when you skip the restaurant, you can reduce your food waste . If it breaks, fix it We admit that things are made differently than they used to be. With the strategy of planned obsolescence , products aren’t designed to last as long and can break rather easily. From fashion to cars to appliances to electronics, things break, go out of style and become obsolete faster than ever. This can lead to spending money on the newest gadgets and trends, even though we could easily fix what is broken or alter what we have to fit our needs. Our grandparents knew how to mend their clothes and fix broken items, or at least knew where to go to get things fixed. Instead of tossing things out the moment they aren’t perfect, take the time to fix or mend them. Bring your lunch Remember when having a sweet lunchbox was an important part of your life? I loved my old-school metal Strawberry Shortcake lunchbox when I was in first grade, and I didn’t even realize that I was eco-friendly while being stylish. Instead of hitting a vending machine or drive-thru for lunch, avoid the single-use plastic packaging and pack your own sandwich and sides at home, or brown-bag last night’s leftovers. For our grandparents, eating out was a special occasion, not something you do every day. Plant a garden Now this is one popular trend that is rooted in the past. Buying local or growing food in your own garden was a staple of life for our grandparents and great-grandparents. Growing veggies and herbs is something you can easily do, no matter if you live in a rural or urban area, and it is friendly to the environment and your wallet. Related: How to grow a lush garden in your tiny kitchen windowsill Shop smart Those who lived through the Great Depression knew what it meant to be smart with their purchases. If they couldn’t afford it, they didn’t buy it, and they never bought more than they needed. Buying in bulk and using up everything that you buy is a much more sustainable way to live. Buy less and use it all. Go to the store with a specific plan, and reduce those impulse buys. Downsize Less stuff means less worry, and that is what minimalism is all about. That doesn’t mean you have to get rid of every modern convenience, but saying no to some things will help reduce your waste and make life tidier. Huge homes, closets full of clothes you don’t wear and cupboards full of food you won’t eat were foreign concepts to our grandparents. Those things would just give you more things to pay for, service and clean. You don’t have to downsize absolutely every aspect of your life, but simply getting rid of excess clutter can make a big difference in your quality of life and environmental impact. Use a clothesline One of the easiest ways to reduce your carbon footprint is to give your dryer a rest and hang up your clothes to dry. This option will keep your clothes from shrinking, and your sheets, blankets, shirts and tees will smell clean and fresh. Start sewing During the Great Depression, nearly every household had at least one person that knew how to full-out sew . But now, it’s hard to find people that even know how to sew a button. Get the most out of your clothes and shoes by learning how to patch a hole, replace a zipper or fix a hem. We aren’t saying you have to make all of your own clothes, but knowing how to fix basic problems can lead to more a sustainable lifestyle with less waste. Related: How to sew buttons onto pants and shirts Rethink disposables Ziploc bags didn’t show up until the 1960s, so our grandparents and great-grandparents would store things in jars. After they were done using them, they would wash and reuse. Instead of using single-use plastics to store food or pack your lunch, use containers that you can use over and over again to help reduce waste. Images via Oldmermaid ,  Bruno Glätsch , Maxmann , Priscilla Du Preez , Maria Michelle , Monika P , Monicore and Shutterstock

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9 sustainable living tips to take from our grandparents

An updated Scandinavian summer cottage weaves Japanese influences throughout

July 18, 2018 by  
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There are few better places to spend a Scandinavian summer than in a breezy cottage by the water. One stellar example is the Summer House completed by Swedish architecture firm Kod Arkitekter in the northern Stockholm archipelago. Located on an island and surrounded by the forest and sea, this home makes the most of its idyllic surroundings with a design that maximizes indoor-outdoor living and combines Scandinavian cottage traditions with Japanese minimalism. Built of timber to reference the surrounding forest, the Summer House comprises a renovated old cottage and a new addition. The clients asked Kod Arkitekter to save and update the cottage — a 65-square-meter structure — and seamlessly integrate it into the extension , a long volume that stretches perpendicular to the existing building. To connect the two buildings, the architects clad both volumes in vertical stained strips of lumber and also topped the house with a dark roofing material. The roof extends over the outdoor patio so that it can be enjoyed rain or shine. Related: Timber-clad waterfront house in Norway epitomizes modern Scandinavian design “With its elongated shape, window setting and the location of the rooms and the patios , the design maximizes the outlook on the water and the unspoiled nature,” explained Kod Arkitekter of the 210-square-meter cottage. “In addition to the Scandinavian traditions, the house draws inspiration from Japan , in an interpretation where simplicity, wood and the relationship with the surrounding nature are at the heart of the architecture.” To mitigate the sloping site, the west end of the T-shaped house is partially elevated on steel posts. The private rooms can be found in the home’s north and south wings. The common areas are located in the west wing, which faces views of the water. Framed by large windows, the communal spaces connect to the outdoors for an indoor-outdoor living experience. + Kod Arkitekter Images via Måns Berg

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An updated Scandinavian summer cottage weaves Japanese influences throughout

Old Greyhound bus converted into gorgeous tiny house on wheels

June 18, 2018 by  
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For most people traveling on a Greyhound bus, the journey usually involves squeezing into cracked polyurethane seating for uncomfortably long periods of time. But that’s not the case for Jessie Lipskin , who transformed an old 1966 Greyhound bus into a shockingly sophisticated and spacious tiny home on wheels . Now, in this new space, the name Greyhound has become synonymous with tiny home living in comfort and style. Lipskin revealed to Apartment Therapy that years of living in New York City inspired her to commit to the tiny home lifestyle . Little by little, she began to get rid of superfluous possessions, until everything she owned could fit in a suitcase. Related: Traveling family renovates old school bus as both solar-powered home and hostel The next step was finding her perfect tiny home, which turned out to be a 1966 GMC Commuter Greyhound bus she found on eBay. According to Lipskin, she chose the bus because “The Greyhound’s classic body style and great condition made the perfect fit for a beautiful tiny home conversion.” After gutting the interior, she installed beautiful new hardwood flooring throughout the space. The interior of the bus was painted all white, which opens up the tiny house tremendously. Additionally, the bus’s original windows were left in place to flood the interior with natural light. LED lighting with dimmers was installed throughout the interior to provide a serene ambiance. Lipskin mapped out a new floor plan for the tiny home that includes a large living area and a full-sized bath, as well as two sleeping areas that comfortably sleep up to four people. Additionally, three large closets were installed – a rarity in such a compact space. The tiny home’s kitchen is equipped with ample wooden counter space, as well as an oven and stove top. An energy-efficient washing machine and dryer also fit into the kitchen, along with an instant hot-water heater and propane tank. There is ample storage to keep the space clutter-free. It took Lipskin three years to create her custom tiny home on wheels , and the result is incredible. However, she has since decided to put the bus up for sale in order to travel internationally. The tiny house is currently listed on Craigslist for $149,000 . + Bus Tiny Home Via Apartment Therapy Photos via Jessie Lipskin

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Old Greyhound bus converted into gorgeous tiny house on wheels

INTERVIEW: Queen of tiny living Felice Cohen on her new guidebook for small spaces

August 30, 2016 by  
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Our story on New Yorker Felice Cohen’s incredibly micro 90-square-foot apartment went viral when we first published it back in 2012, and now the author, organizer and speaker is sharing her tiny living experiences in a new book entitled 90 Lessons for Living Large in 90 Square Feet (…or more) . Felice was kind enough to share some of her tiny living tips with us recently on our NYC site — click through to see what she has to say about making the most of a minuscule abode.

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INTERVIEW: Queen of tiny living Felice Cohen on her new guidebook for small spaces

The Prefab MUJI House is a Daylit Minimalist Dream Home in Tokyo

December 30, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of The Prefab MUJI House is a Daylit Minimalist Dream Home in Tokyo Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architectural Daylighting , daylight , Daylighting , daylit interiors , Japan , Japanese , japanese architecture , Japanse MUJI house , Minimalism , minimalist , minimalistic interiors , Muji , MUJI furnishing , MUJI house , MUJI house Tokyo , Muji Japan , natural light , naturally lit , open plan design , prefab home , sunlight , three-storey home , Tokyo , wooden facade

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The Prefab MUJI House is a Daylit Minimalist Dream Home in Tokyo

Artificial snow is set to fall on Dubai’s World Islands

December 30, 2014 by  
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Snow is a distant dream in a place like Dubai, where the wintertime temperature doesn’t typically drop below 57 degrees Fahrenheit. Real estate developer the Kleindienst Group wants to make it snow and rain on Dubai’s man-made The World Islands archipelago , effectively creating an outdoor climate-controlled environment. They’ve already begun bringing this dream to life with a test snowman, built from snow made from special machines. Read the rest of Artificial snow is set to fall on Dubai’s World Islands Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: archipelago , artificial winter , Austria , climate control , dubai , islands , Josef Kleindienst , Kleindienst Group , man-made islands , man-made snow , renewable energy , snow , snowman , The Heart of Europe , The World , tourism , water issues

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Artificial snow is set to fall on Dubai’s World Islands

House H: Y Beams, Hanging Floors and Irregular Cutouts Transform a Tiny Japanese Home

January 30, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of House H: Y Beams, Hanging Floors and Irregular Cutouts Transform a Tiny Japanese Home Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Chiba Prefecture , Daylighting , eco design , green design , green renovation , hanging floors , Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects , House H , Japan , Japanese minimalism , Matsudo City , Minimalism , sustainable design , sustainable renovation , Tokyo , Urban design , Y beams

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House H: Y Beams, Hanging Floors and Irregular Cutouts Transform a Tiny Japanese Home

Less is More: Suzanne Rae’s Minimalist Looks Draw a Crowd at New York Fashion Week

September 16, 2012 by  
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Designer Suzanne Rae’s simple, strong collection looks bold and uncomplicated on the surface, but there’s a second-tier to the monochromes, neutrals and color block. Rae’s 2013 collection was inspired by the work of photographer Francesca Woodman . Woodman, who spent much of her career studying the multifaceted role of women, makes for a complex homage in Rae’s latest collection. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: color clock , ecouterre , female photographer , Francesca Woodman , historical inspiration to fashion , Minimalism , neutrals , new york fashion week , silk sheath , Suzanne Rae , women’s duality role , women’s studies , women’s wear

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Less is More: Suzanne Rae’s Minimalist Looks Draw a Crowd at New York Fashion Week

Curvaceous Light Stage House in Hiroshima Makes the Most of an Awkward Lot

February 27, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Curvaceous Light Stage House in Hiroshima Makes the Most of an Awkward Lot Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Daylighting , eco design , Future Studio , green design , Hiroshima , Japan , Minimalism , passive design , sustainable design , The Light Stage House

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Curvaceous Light Stage House in Hiroshima Makes the Most of an Awkward Lot

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