11 inspiring designs we loved at Milan Design Week 2018

April 26, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on 11 inspiring designs we loved at Milan Design Week 2018

Designers awed and inspired attendees at this year’s Milan Design Week with fresh takes on contemporary design. From unexpected uses for wood and recycled materials to advanced lighting technology , we spotted countless incredible projects throughout the event — read on for 11 of our favorite designs from Milan Design Week 2018. Sila lamp by Zsuzsanna Horvath Helsinki-based Hungarian architect Zsuzsanna Horvath developed the Sila lamp – an elegant lamp that emerges from a two-dimensional plane of laser-cut birch plywood. The lamp’s structure is made with thin, delicate slivers of plywood connected by a flexible OLED panel. With its soft light and delicate shape, this lamp is a perfect addition for quiet and cozy interiors. Bread chair by Mika Tsutai This Bread Chair by Japanese designer Mika Tsutai is definitely an object of good taste… and good humor. Inspired by the unpredictable shape of bread, Tsutai kneaded dough — real dough, made from flour — shaped it into a chair, and baked it. The baked piece was scanned, and a digital model was created. The designer used this model to carve the same shape from wood. The unique shape reflects the random swelling of bread after baking. Macaron seat by Kalo Kalo created the Macaron Seat by using locally-recycled bits of rubber. Each seat is crafted by pressing a mold onto a wooden frame. This seat catches the eye using juxtapositions: smooth wooden legs contrast with a textured seat and a shining brass element along the edges of the dark rubber. Halo lamp by Mandalaki Designed by the Milan-based Mandalaki office, the Halo lamp is a bold combination of art and technology. Unlike most lamps, Halo does not provide neutral white illumination. Instead, it dyes space with vivid, unexpected colors. The vivid colors are produced by analog optical decomposition instead of an RGB LED. Mandalaki developed a dichroic filter to divide the pure luminous flux, or the measure of perceived light, into a vast spectrum of colors. Sundial clock by YOY You don’t need sunlight to use this Sundial wall clock by Tokyo-based design studio YOY. Although at first sight it seems to be a real sundial, it is only an illusion. Part of the “Fictionality” collection, this clock has a regular bar as the minute hand and a “shadow” as the hour hand, which is imprinted on the clock’s face. Surprisingly, the entire clock rotates to show the correct time. Plug It by Studio Oberhauser Instead of discarding thousands of small wood scraps from the industrial production of furniture, Studio Oberhauser created Plug It to exemplify the beauty of recycling. The studio suggests that stacking the comb-shaped wood chips to craft pieces of furniture can be a fun and functional game for everyone. Sea of Plastic by EcoBirdy EcoBirdy’s main goal is to reduce the sea of plastic . To do this, the company crafted children’s furniture entirely from recycled plastic. Plus, each item can be easily recycled again. The Antwerp-based designers have also involved children in this socially- and environmentally-responsible act by designing a storybook and a school program that teaches children about sustainable living. D.01 bench by Davide Montanaro Wood appears to be a stiff and rigid material, but it can be made to bend with just the right touch. Dukta is a unique incision process that can make wood into a flexible, manageable material. Davide Montanaro used this process to design the plywood D.01 bench and ensured the piece had character with its smooth shape and distinct pattern. S-Lab clock by 4R 4R made the S-Lab clock using recycled plastic. The entire production process, from collection to melting and molding was completed in-house. The designers were able to control the color, pattern and texture of the clock. With this project, the team hopes to continue working and exploring with plastic in their designs. Woodencap by Rootpecker Rootpecker has made design history by creating the first wooden cap in the world. The hat is handmade in Germany and features a smooth, flexible wood surface and intricate stitching. The company aims to source only eco-friendly materials for their unique products. Paper and Light by Denis Guidone and Tomoko Fuse Designer Denis Guidone and origami artist Tomoko Fuse created Paper and Light to blend classic and contemporary techniques. This project includes a series of lamps made from folded washi, a traditional Japanese paper. The folded light installments illuminate the area and create playful shadows. + Milan Design Week Images via Maria Novozhilova for Inhabitat

Original post: 
11 inspiring designs we loved at Milan Design Week 2018

This spiraling sculpture can absorb the emissions of 90,000 cars

April 25, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This spiraling sculpture can absorb the emissions of 90,000 cars

Kengo Kuma just unveiled a spiraling, air-purifying sculpture that can absorb the emissions produced by 90,000 cars in a year. Kuma’s “Breath/ng” is made from a cutting-edge fabric with a nano-molecule activated core that separates and absorbs toxic molecules. Developed by Anemotech , this pollution-neutralizing material uses the natural flow of air to purify the surrounding environment. Created from 120 hand-folded origami “ Breath ” panels (each 1.2 meters by 1.2 meters), Kuma’s spiraling work is about six meters tall. The installation’s 175 square meters of fabric are enough to absorb the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from around 90,000 cars per year. The spiral is suspended from a single carbon fiber rod and fixed in place by 46 unique 3D-printed joints, which were made with a HP Multi Jet Fusion printer . Related: A giant, air-purifying “cloud” just popped up in the middle of Milan The entire “Breath/ng” structure was developed using advanced Dassault Systèmes software and tools. In fact, the French company — a leader in the 3D design world — invited and inspired Kuma to explore the theme, “Design in the Age of Experience.” Along with Kuma’s spiral, Dassault Systèmes presented other ecological works by Daan Roosegaarde and Wesley Goatley e Superflux at Milan Design Week 2018. The powerful aesthetics of Kuma’s air purifying installation offer a great zero-energy solution for contaminated cities. The installation boldly transforms the nearly-invisible problem of air pollution into a visible, tangible experience. + Kengo Kuma + Milan Design Week Images via Maria Novozhilova for Inhabitat

Continued here:
This spiraling sculpture can absorb the emissions of 90,000 cars

A giant, air-purifying "cloud" just popped up in the middle of Milan

April 18, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A giant, air-purifying "cloud" just popped up in the middle of Milan

If you’re tired of breathing less-than-clean city air , Milan has a temporary respite for you. “Transitions,” a giant, cloud-like pod, has landed in the heart of the Brera Design District for Milan Design Week 2018 . As envisioned by Takehiro Ikeda, the enormous “water-drop pavilion” uses Panasonic ‘s cutting edge air-purifying technology to provide all those who enter with clean, cool air. Most cloud-like design installations create mist using gases, which aren’t exactly good for the visitors’ health. The Panasonic pavilion, however, employs only natural water to build an intangible and immersive experience: a walk through atmospheric, ultra-fine mist created with the company’s groundbreaking technology. Panasonic’s “Nanoe x” technology collects moisture from the air and uses high voltage to create nano-sized particles of water. Highly reactive components called OH radicals — which are generated in huge numbers and inhibit viruses and bacteria — remove odors and allergens and prevent mold. The pavilion utilizes compressed air to turn water into a “silky fine mist.” Unlike a conventional two-fluid nozzle model, this technology creates a fine mist using low-pressure air and eliminates the need for large compressors, making it an attractive option for city cooling technology. Takehiro Ikeda said the “Transition” installation is a preview of the latest air purification research, which will be used during the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo to guarantee a pleasant, cool atmosphere during the hot Japanese summer. Related: Kengo Kuma wins bid for Tokyo’s Olympic stadium, Zaha Hadid speaks out The project is also energy-efficient. Instead of using large amounts of natural resources to power the air conditioning system, the pavilion – which measures about 20 meters in diameter – needs only a few liters of water for each functioning cycle. With this installation, Panasonic is celebrating its 100-year anniversary and transitioning towards a new creative philosophy: designing products, services and experiences that go beyond physical products to address emotional and environmental well-being. + Milan Design Week 2018 Images via Maria Novozhilova for Inhabitat

Read the original here:
A giant, air-purifying "cloud" just popped up in the middle of Milan

This carved wood bench hides an unexpected surprise

April 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This carved wood bench hides an unexpected surprise

This simple-looking bench hides a two-fold surprise. A closer look reveals that the ‘tufted’ bench is actually carved out of solid wood – and when you sit down it’s bouncy and soft! Valentijn Rieb and Andrea Schimmer perfectly replicated the iconic form of a Chesterfield bench while marrying the look of wood with the comfot of a springy seat. Chester-Block-Hocker updates the classic Chesterfield bench with carved beach wood blocks. The soft, bouncy element comes from the inner support structure of the bench. Thanks to springs located under each diamond-shaped chunk of wood, this bench serves as a cushy seat. The legs of the bench are upholstered with leather to make the transformation complete. Related: Max Lamb’s “Exercises in Seating” is a primitive investigation of materials at Milan Design Week This design is the result of modern technology meeting manual labor and traditional craftsmanship. To realize Chester-Block-Hocker, the blocks were CNC milled and shaped by hand. Made with the utmost precision and a great attention to the detail, this bench offers a soft touch and a surprising material experience that will intrigue you each time you take a seat. The Chester-Block-Hocker won the Baars & Bloemhoff “Master of Materials” prize and is on show at the Masterly Dutch exhibition at Palazzo Turati in the 5VIE design district at Milan Design Week 2017 . + Milan Design Week images by Maria Novozhilova for Inhabitat

The rest is here: 
This carved wood bench hides an unexpected surprise

Honda steps up with new green car strategy

April 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Honda steps up with new green car strategy

Honda’s green car strategy has taken criticism over the past few years for its inability to keep up with the venerable Toyota Prius . Well, the automaker is stepping up with their introduction of the new Clarity Electric and Clarity Plug-in hybrid recently – at the New York Auto Show. The new Clarity Electric and Clarity Plug-in hybrid will be sold alongside the Clarity Fuel Cell , which is already on sale. With all three models, Honda hopes to be able to sell at least 75,000 Clarity vehicles in the first four model years. The Clarity will also help Honda reach its goal of having two-thirds of its vehicles electrified by 2030. Related: 2017 Honda Clarity fuel cell vehicle is ready for the mainstream The Honda Clarity Plug-in Hybrid will have a 42-mile electric driving range, which is still shy of the Chevy Volt, but longer than the Toyota Prius Prime . Once the battery is depleted, the Clarity Plug-in Hybrid uses a 1.5-liter Atkinson cycle 4-cylinder engine to give it an overall driving range rating of over 330 miles. The Clarity Plug-in hybrid’s electric motor generates 181-horsepower electric motor with 232 lb.-ft. of torque and is mated to a 17-kilowatt hour (kWh) battery. It will only take 2.5 hours to fully recharge it using a 240 volt outlet. The Clarity Plug-in Hybrid will have EPA fuel economy rating of 105 MPGe. The Honda Clarity Electric is powered by a 161-horsepower electric motor with 221 lb.-ft. of torque that is mated to a 25.5-kWh battery pack. The Clarity Electric will only have a driving range of around 80 miles, but it can by fully charged in just over three hours at 240 volts or up to 80 percent in just 30 minutes using a DC fast charger . The Clarity Electric will have a 111 combined MPGe rating. The Clarity Electric’s driving range is a bit disappointing, since we now have other electric cars with a much longer driving range. Still, Honda expects the Clarity Plug-in hybrid to be the sales volume leader out of the three Clarity models. Images @Honda + Honda

See the original post: 
Honda steps up with new green car strategy

These 3D-printed off-grid tiny houses can withstand hurricanes and earthquakes

April 13, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on These 3D-printed off-grid tiny houses can withstand hurricanes and earthquakes

These 3D-printed off-grid homes manufactured by Ukrainian startup PassivDom are not only 100% self-sufficient – they can also withstand hurricanes and earthquakes. The “gadget houses” are completely powered by the sun , and they’re available as fully furnished modules that can be controlled by a smartphone. PassivDom ‘s homes use solar power to satisfy all the needs of their occupants – including climate control (heating and cooling) and air quality. Each house features state-of-the-art engineering including an air recuperation system, a heat pump for heating and cooling with a remote-controlled thermostat hub, a HEPA system, a photovoltaic off-grid system powered by LiFePO2 batteries, a gray water filtration system with heat recovery , heat energy storage, and a boiler and water tank. Related: 7 charming off-grid homes for a rent-free life The homes’ impressive performance makes them versatile enough to suit any climate and topography. An industrial 3D-printing robot creates each house layer-by-layer using printing materials like carbon fiber , fiberglass , and polyurethane – all of which are easy to recycle. Because the structures don’t have foundations, they are easy to transport and assemble in any configuration. + PassivDom

See the original post here: 
These 3D-printed off-grid tiny houses can withstand hurricanes and earthquakes

5 surprising products made from hemp

April 6, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on 5 surprising products made from hemp

Hemp is a sustainable supermaterial with a wide range of applications that go far beyond hacky sacks and beaded bracelets. An experimental project called Fabric-Action explores exciting new uses for hemp – including modular gardens, skateboards, swings, and even air purifiers . Each design emphasizes the intrinsic qualities of this natural, sustainable and fast-growing material while showing how hemp can fit the latest production techniques such as 3D-printing, CNC technology and laser-cutting. Click on for five intriguing hemp products from the Fabric-Action show at Milan Design Week 2017. Agri-Hemp , designed by Michele Armellini and Marco Grimandi , is a modular indoor gardening system. Agri-hemp pots of different sizes are realized in thermo-formable woven hemp, a new material inspired by traditional hemp fabric. The system is completed by vertical wooden legs designed to support the hemp pots. Delta-9 by Gabriele Basei is a skateboard made out of waterproof hemp that is decorated with textile inserts typical of Umbria’s style. Kinesis by Ekaterina Shchetina e Libero Rutilo is a swing made out of three different types of hemp. Suspended on traditional hemp ropes, the swing features a seat made out of Canapalithos, a pressed hemp panel, and knobs made of 3D-printed hemp plastic. Carlotta Antonietti, Laura Tardella and Marzia Tolomei ‘s Paidia is a suspended cradle that utilizes several of hemp’s key attributes. Hemp is antibacterial, resistant to moisture, heat-insulating and light, so it’s the perfect material for this baby product, which is made out of hemp felt and lined with hemp fabric. Once your newborn grows up, Paidia can be easily transformed into a soft basket for toy storage. Soft by Enrico Azzimonti is an air purification system entirely made of hemp-derived materials. The project integrates the use of digital technologies such as 3D-printing to create tubular textile hemp filters that purify indoor spaces. These designs were presented at Milan Design Week 2017 and can be seen at Fuorisalone 2017 in Universita Statale di Milano. + Milan Design Week images by Maria Novozhilova for Inhabitat

Go here to read the rest: 
5 surprising products made from hemp

Zaha Hadid Architects 3D prints an experimental structure with the help of robots

April 6, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Zaha Hadid Architects 3D prints an experimental structure with the help of robots

Robots are revolutionizing architecture and Zaha Hadid Architects is hopping on board to show what that technology can do for custom building design. The world-renowned architecture firm unveiled Thallus, a beautifully ornate experimental structure created with the help of robots for Milan Design Week’s White in the City. The sculpture was programmed and executed by the firm’s Computation Design (ZHA CoDe) research group. Located at Milan’s Brera Academy, Thallus joins a series of temporary installations all created for White in the City , a project that explores the color white as a symbol of health, sustainability, and serenity. Thallus is named after the Greek word for flora and features a tapered shape that opens up at the top like a flower or unfurled leaf. Six-axis robotic 3D printing technology was used to create the sculpture, made up of continuous and repeating loops. The nearly three-meter-tall Thallus was 3D printed from premium polylactide plastic . Related: MINI’s tiny innovative home for three purifies the air in Milan “The design explores differential growth methods through expansion and diffusion arising from a single continuous seed curve guided iteratively via simulation parameters while constrained to a reference surface,” writes the firm. “Density gradation and direction of growth have been defined by parameters such as proximity to boundaries, angled direction of rulings, as well as structural requirements.” Thallus is on display at the Pinacoteca di Brera from April 4 to April 9, 2017. + Zaha Hadid Architects Images by Luke Hayes

View original post here:
Zaha Hadid Architects 3D prints an experimental structure with the help of robots

Pavilion made from 300 pairs of blue jeans just popped up in Milan

April 5, 2017 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Pavilion made from 300 pairs of blue jeans just popped up in Milan

Here’s something we’ve never seen before: a structure made entirely of pants! Starchitects Diller Scofidio+ Renfro just unveiled a sprawling pavilion made from 300 pairs of blue jeans in Milan. The installation is called Linking Minds , and it re-interprets the idea of using ready-made modules (in this case pants) in architecture. The surreal jean canopy soars over the historic Palazzo Litta in Milan. While the individual pairs of pants represent the human scale of urban life, the meshed twisted structure points to a sense of community and the collective nature of architecture. Liz Diller engaged with the historical Palazzo Litta in 5VIE during Milan Design Week 2017 to reinterpret one of the most basic architectural elements: the roof. Formally, Diller’s suspended structure resembles the 3D-printed twisted mesh typically used for festivals. However, in this case the structure is realized with an unexpected, simple but iconic material: denim. Jeans are one of the most ubiquitous garments around the world, however they’re also very private and intimate items that we wear in direct contact with our skin. Related: 14 conversation-starting chairs that push the boundaries of design Jeans are also a curious object in terms of structure. Having two legs and one waist, it has an implicit structural logic that allows various combinations and spatial patterns. Connected waist-to-waist and cuff-to-cuff, and filled with air, the Linking Minds installation is a visually dynamic work of art and architecture that is one of the main landmarks of Milan Design Week 2017 . Diller Scofidio+ Renfro + Milan Design Week

More: 
Pavilion made from 300 pairs of blue jeans just popped up in Milan

Design duo Raw Edges brings interactive Herringbones installation to Milan 2016

April 13, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Design duo Raw Edges brings interactive Herringbones installation to Milan 2016

For Milan Design week 2016, London-based, Israeli-born designers Raw Edges collaborated with 5VIE Art + Design to create “Herringbones,” an unusual and eye-catching exploration of wood, colored dye, and herringbone motifs, all while putting visitors in the driver’s seat of design. Visitors were invited to dye pine planks by dipping them in buckets of colored dye, and then arrange them into beautiful patterns in a group design experience. Read the rest of Design duo Raw Edges brings interactive Herringbones installation to Milan 2016

Go here to see the original:
Design duo Raw Edges brings interactive Herringbones installation to Milan 2016

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 7310 access attempts in the last 7 days.