Space10 is taking on fast food with bug-based burgers and meatballs

March 15, 2018 by  
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Space10 is re-inventing our favorite fast food dishes in a delicious and sustainable way. We’ve all heard that meat is awful for the environment, but that doesn’t make the cravings for a juicy burger easier to ignore. And what’s a backyard barbecue without the hot dogs? Thanks to Space10’s Bug Burger, not-Dog, Microgreen Ice Cream and Neatball, you won’t have to give up your fast food favorites while still staying virtuous. Space10 is all about figuring out ways to make the future a better place to be. They’ve tackled everything from furniture to urban gardening , and now they’re perfecting sustainable, healthy eating. To illustrate their innovations, the IKEA-based group has created a menu that will get your mouth watering. The Dogless Hotdog is a twist on the classic made out of a spirulina bun topped with dried and glazed baby carrots, beet ketchup, cucumber and herb salad. Thanks to the micro-algae bun, it packs more protein than a real hotdog. The Bug Burger is made out of beetroot, parsnip, potatoes and mealworm with a locally, hydroponically-grown salad mix topping. We tasted a version of the burger, and trust us, you’ll never miss a beef burger again. Related: IKEA’s SPACE10 lab is bringing a pop-up vertical farm to London Space10 has also taken on the iconic IKEA meatball with the Neatball. One version is made out of mealworms, and another out of root veggies. If all this talk about bugs has you (ahem) bugging out, it’s worth noting that bugs are a sustainable source of protein, but they don’t have to taste like insects. In Space10’s in-house chef’s capable hands, you would never even know that you are munching on mealworm, and that’s their goal. Space10 wants us to move away from carbon-heavy meals without giving up the flavor or convenience of a fast food meal. To round it all out, Spac10 created the LOKAL salad, which is made out of microgreens grown hydroponically in the Space10 basement. And these aren’t your basic microgreens – the salad options include red frill mustard, lemon balm and borage; pea sprouts, pink stem radish and thyme; and red-veined sorrel, broccoli and tarragon. Don’t worry, they didn’t forget dessert. Their microgreen ice cream is made out of fennel, coriander, basil or mint with a low-sugar base sweetened with apple juice, apples and lemon juice. Sadly, you can’t get these treats anywhere but Space10 right now, but next time you wish you had a burger, imagine the possibilities. + Space10

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Space10 is taking on fast food with bug-based burgers and meatballs

The melting Arctic is already changing the ocean’s circulation

March 15, 2018 by  
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In the far North Atlantic , scientists have uncovered new evidence that an unusual infusion of freshwater into the ocean may already be affecting the ocean’s circulation. Mostly likely sourced from melting glaciers in Greenland or Arctic sea ice, the freshwater remains on the surface of the ocean for longer than denser saltwater. This could affect the ocean’s natural process known as convection, in which northbound surface water becomes denser and colder, thus sinking then traveling south at great depths. “Until now, models have predicted something for the future … but it was something that seemed very distant,” study lead author Marilena Oltmanns told the Washington Post . “But now we saw with these observations that there is actually freshwater and that it is already affecting convection, and it delays convection quite a lot in some years.” The research team gathered data on Irminger Sea to the southeast of Greenland , where they used ocean moorings to take measurements regarding the circulation of ocean water at key convection sites. While the study does not make any specific predictions regarding how convection may be affected, or how quickly it may change, the conclusion that freshwater from melting glaciers or sea ice may be already affecting convection is noteworthy. In 2010, 40 percent of melted freshwater remained on the surface through winter and into the next year. The staying power of the melted freshwater may suggest a positive feedback loop that could drive further mixing. Related: Pre-industrial carbon found in Canadian Arctic waters “It is possible that there is a threshold, that if there is a lot of freshwater that stays at the surface, and mixes with the new freshwater from the new summer, it suddenly doubles, or increases a lot, and the next winter , it’s a lot more difficult to break through,” said Oltmanns. It is already established that Atlantic circulation has been weaker than average since 2008, with scientists crediting climate change , cyclical patterns, or both. While the changes to convection may occur over time, the latest study indicates that change may occur more rapidly than expected. “There might be a threshold that is crossed, and it’s harder to get back to where we were before,” said Oltmanns. “It’s possible.” Via The Washington Post Images via Depositphotos (1)

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The melting Arctic is already changing the ocean’s circulation

Meet the Monocabin, a tiny home rental mere steps from the Aegean Sea

March 15, 2018 by  
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Milan-based Mandalaki Design Studio has created the gorgeous all-white Monocabin – a prototype for micro-living rentals located on the Greek island of Rhodes. At just over 270 square feet, this micro-home is made out of modular concrete panels and inspired by the island’s traditional architecture – which is simple, clean and cozy. This miniature piece of Greek holiday heaven, which is just steps away from the Aegean Sea, can currently be rented on Airbnb . The Monocabin’s modular concrete panels give the structure a traditional yet modern feel. The interior space, with a “hidden” bedroom and compact kitchen and living area, is simple but elegant. The walls, as well as most of the furnishings, are completely white, exuding an ethereal character. Related: Cool micro studio in Budapest makes the most out of 344 square feet Large and small windows located in every room provide plenty of natural light, reducing the need for artificial lighting. Additionally, Mandalaki’s own solar-powered lights are featured within the project. Outside, the cabin offers a beautiful open-air terrace that pulls double duty as a lounge area where guests can dine al fresco, under trees that provide plenty of shade. The courtyard is open and uncluttered, again paying homage to the simplicity that defines the island’s architecture. According to the architects, the cabins were inspired by idea that the island’s laid-back, minimalist lifestyle could be transported to other parts of the world via architecture. “The dream was to build a livable and modular design object we could place anywhere in the world sharing our design philosophy,” says George Kolliopoulos, co-founder and designer at Mandalaki. “And the story had to begin in Rhodes, my home island.” + Mandalaki Design Studio Via The Spaces Photographs via Mandalaki Design Studio

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Meet the Monocabin, a tiny home rental mere steps from the Aegean Sea

The farmers growing food across frigid northern latitudes

December 22, 2017 by  
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Although frost has arrived in most subtropical regions of the Northern Hemisphere, farmers still carry on even in the most extreme cold climates with the help of innovative technology and thoughtful design. Polar Permaculture Solutions of Norway  and the Inuvik Community Greenhouse of Canada are outstanding examples of defiant, determined agriculture in the Arctic. With features such as hydroponic systems, insulated greenhouses, and compost-warmed geodesic domes, these farms are far from frozen despite their high latitude locations. Benjamin Vidmar, founder of Polar Permaculture Solutions , was inspired to make a change through observations of his home, Longyearbyen on Spitsbergen, the Svalbard archipelago’s largest island. “This whole island is about extraction: whales, coal, animals, fish, gas, oil,” Vidmar told Mic . “Everything here is based on taking things from the Earth . I feel like I have to do something for this town.” Vidmar, a chef, began researching methods for growing food in harsh, frigid climates and started growing microgreens for home and restaurant use in an insulated geodesic dome. Since then, Polar Permaculture Solutions has opened its doors for tours and classes for those interested in the challenge. Vidmar hopes to acquire a biodigester, which would create heat and fertilizer from food waste and quail droppings. Related: New Antarctic farm will grow produce despite temperatures of -100 d Across the Atlantic, then again across the most northern regions of North America, communities in Canada’s Northwest Territories are also implementing innovative systems to grow food despite the short season. In the small town of Inuvik, the Inuvik Community Greenhouse , which was converted from an old hockey rink, is now a cherished community space for all ages. The Greenhouse has 250 members, 149 community garden beds, and 24 smaller beds that grow a wide variety of vegetables, fruits, and flowers. During the growing season, which lasts from May to September in the greenhouse, community members donate 100 pounds of food to the local food bank. The Greenhouse also offers a compost collection service for town residents, which reduces local food waste, helps to build greenhouse soil, and financially supports the greenhouse’s growth. Via Mic Images via Polar Permaculture Solutions and Inuvik Greenhouse

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The farmers growing food across frigid northern latitudes

Two protective layers keep this angular house in Chile cool in the summer

December 22, 2017 by  
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The angular Two Skins House, designed by architect Veronica Arcos , is enveloped in two insulating layers that help maintain stable temperatures indoors all year roound. Perched on high cliffs north of Santiago, Chile , the house features generous openings that offer views of the Pacific Ocean. The house has a simple rectangular plan and faceted walls that add drama to the space. Dark pine planks used as cladding add additional variation to the exterior surfaces. Pine and other wooden structural panels were used to bring a little warmth and nature into the interior. Related: Angular cedar-clad home in New Zealand is designed to go completely off-grid Thanks to the presence of two outer layers, occupants can benefit from stable temperatures throughout the year. The gap between the layers facilitates natural ventilation and keeps the house cool in the summer. Mineral wool insulates the inner structure, while a zinc coating protects it from humidity. An overhang on the northern side shelters a raised platform and steps that lead to the garden. This wall extends to enclose the east-facing terrace and provide more privacy for this space. Most functions are housed on the ground floor, while the mezzanine , which marks the spot where the sloping roof reaches its highest point, accommodates the master bedroom. Minimalist interior design dominates the living room, with pops of color providing visual accents. + Veronica Arcos Arquitectos Photos by Cristóbal Palma

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Two protective layers keep this angular house in Chile cool in the summer

Subterranean London farm to harvest first crop 100 feet below street level

July 1, 2015 by  
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London’s new underground farm is nearly open for business. We’ve reported on Growing Underground in the past, when the founders used crowdfunding to raise money for their equipment. This week, the city’s first subterranean farm is nearing completion of ‘phase one’ of production, putting the producers just a few weeks away from delivering the first harvest of pea shoots, radishes, and celery to commercial customers. Read the rest of Subterranean London farm to harvest first crop 100 feet below street level Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “clean energy” , environmentally friendly farming , growing underground , hydroponic farm , hydroponics , London , london underground farm , low-energy , microgreens , subterranean farm , Urban Farming

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Subterranean London farm to harvest first crop 100 feet below street level

Origami-Inspired Microgarden Gives City Dwellers an Easy Way to Grow Fresh, Organic Veggies at Home

May 13, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Origami-Inspired Microgarden Gives City Dwellers an Easy Way to Grow Fresh, Organic Veggies at Home Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: agar agar , agar agar gel , agar agar powder , grown your own vegetables , grown your own vegetables kit , IndieGoGo , infarm , local produce , Microgarden , microgarden kit , microgreens , mini green house , organic produce , organic veggies , origami greenhouse , tomorrow machine

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Origami-Inspired Microgarden Gives City Dwellers an Easy Way to Grow Fresh, Organic Veggies at Home

New Harvard Study Reveals Link Between Bee Colony Collapse Disorder and Neonicotinoid Pesticides

May 13, 2014 by  
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A new study by the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) confirms what has long been feared: insecticides, in particular those in the neonicotinoid class, are causing the wide-scale collapse of bee colonies . According to the UN , bees are responsible for pollinating 70 of the 100 crop species that account for 90% of the world’s food – so it’s a scientific imperative to find and eliminate the cause of declining bee populations around the globe. Read the rest of New Harvard Study Reveals Link Between Bee Colony Collapse Disorder and Neonicotinoid Pesticides Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: agriculture , Animals , bee dieof , bees , CCD , Chensheng Lu , colony collapse disorder , dead insects , food crops , food production , harvard school of public health , honeybees , insects , neonicotinoid , pesticides , pollination , pollinators

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New Harvard Study Reveals Link Between Bee Colony Collapse Disorder and Neonicotinoid Pesticides

How to Farm in Your Big City Apartment

March 21, 2012 by  
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Saying “I live in an urban environment” has long been an excuse to compromise healthy salad greens for convenience, but one New York City-based artist is out to change that. Jenna Spevack, artist and professor of creative media at City University…

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How to Farm in Your Big City Apartment

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