Tropical greenery surrounds a sustainable, solar-powered home in Singapore

February 13, 2020 by  
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In Singapore, a lush veil of tropical plants has enveloped a sustainable home for a family of five. The house, aptly named “Fade to Green,” is the work of Singaporean design studio HYLA Architects , who was tapped to create a semi-detached home that was green in both design and spirit. In addition to its thriving tropical foliage, the house is equipped with a rainwater harvesting system and rooftop solar panels to reduce the building’s environmental footprint. Located on a long and narrow lot, the Fade to Green house makes the most of its rectangular footprint by building upward and leaving space for a generous L-shaped garden that wraps around the front and side of the home. In contrast to its more traditional neighbors, the contemporary house is wrapped in a timber screen made from strips of Kebony — a treated timber product from Norway — selected for its ability to develop a natural gray patina over time. The spacing of the slats in the timber screen vary in size to either provide privacy or enough sunlight for plants to thrive. Related: Stunning solar-powered home in Singapore melds with adjacent botanic gardens “Sited within the tropical heritage surrounding of the botanic gardens , the house was designed with the narrative of nature and its relationship with architecture,” the architects explained. “Building around the inhabitant’s experience, the house blurs spatial boundaries to orchestrate light and environment into daily life. Contrary to resisting the elements of nature, the house pursues this idea of when the building stops, nature takes over.” Dense tropical foliage surrounds the building and provides privacy and a cooling microclimate. Nature is continuously referenced throughout the home, from the ground floor where the open-plan living and dining area seamlessly connects to the garden through sliding glass doors to the predominant use of timber and stone in the minimalist materials palette. The bedrooms — three on the second floor and the master suite on the top floor — are also set back to provide space for a continuous layer of landscaping that grows along the wraparound garden terrace. + HYLA Architects Images via Derek Swalwell via HYLA Architects

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Tropical greenery surrounds a sustainable, solar-powered home in Singapore

Steven Holls new solar-powered concert hall plays up the dramatic contrast between new and old

July 16, 2019 by  
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New York-based Steven Holl Architects and Architecture Acts has won an international competition to design the new 1,300-seat concert hall in Ostrava, Czech Republic. Created as a “perfect acoustic instrument in its case,” the acoustics-driven design has a strikingly contemporary appearance with a rounded zinc-clad exterior that stands in dramatic contrast with the Ostrava Cultural Center, a modern classicism-style building that will be overlapped by the new concert hall. In addition to optimized acoustics, the shape of the new building is engineered to minimize energy demands and the hall will be entirely powered by rooftop solar panels. Slated to begin construction in 2022, the new building has a roughly teardrop-shaped form with the concert hall positioned at the rear to shield it from urban traffic noise. The new entrance on the promenade appears to float over the top of the existing Cultural center and connects to a new sky-lit lobby. The rounded facade is clad in zinc with a titanium oxide smog-eating coating and punctuated with triple-glazed windows to prevent heat gains. The roof is topped with solar panels, while stormwater will be collected from the roofs of the Cultural Center and the new building and then treated and collected in a garden pond to create a cooling microclimate. Related: Zaha Hadid Architects wins bid for Russia’s new Sverdlovsk Philharmonic Concert Hall “The smooth case of zinc holds an “instrument” in an extended vineyard-type plan made of concrete and maple wood,” explain the architects in a press statement. “Czech composer, Leoš Janá?ek’s theories of time will guide and give order to the concert hall’s interior geometry. Acoustic wall panels are organized according to scasovani, or rhythm, in three variants: Znici = sounding; Scitaci = counting; and Scelovac = summing.” The new concert hall will fulfill a decades-long dream of Ostrava to provide a more suitable space for the Janá?ek Philharmonic Orchestra, one of the leading orchestras in the Czech Republic . The concert hall competition was the biggest architectural competition in the city’s recent history. The opening ceremony for the new concert hall and refurbished Ostrava Cultural Center building is scheduled for 2024. + Steven Holl Architects Images Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

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Steven Holls new solar-powered concert hall plays up the dramatic contrast between new and old

Ingenhoven breaks ground on a hedge-wrapped green heart in Dsseldorf

June 10, 2019 by  
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In May, German architectural firm Ingenhoven Architects broke ground on Kö-Bogen II, a sustainable mixed-use development envisioned as the “new green heart” of Düsseldorf , Germany. Designed to visually extend the adjoining Hofgarten park into the inner city, Kö-Bogen II wraps the sloping facades of its two buildings with hornbeam hedges that total nearly 5 miles in length. The hedges and turfed rooftop spaces will also help purify the air and combat the city’s heat island effect by providing a cooling microclimate. Located at Gustaf-Gründgens-Platz, Kö-Bogen II will serve as a commercial and office complex covering 42,000 square meters of gross floor area offering retail, restaurants, office space, local recreation and a five-story underground parking garage with 670 spaces. The development comprises a five-story trapezoid-shaped main building and a smaller triangular building that cluster around a valley-like plaza. The sloping facades, which will be planted with hornbeam hedges, open up the plaza to views of the iconic Dreischeibenhaus and the Düsseldorf Theater nearby. The architects will also be refurbishing the roof, facade and public areas of the Düsseldorf Theater. “In order to do justice to the overall urban design situation, the design of Kö-Bogen II deliberately avoids a classical block-edged development such as that along the Schadowstrasse shopping street,” the architects explained in a press release. “In addition, the idea of green architecture has been applied systematically, thus distinguishing the development from conventional architectural solutions.” Related: A rainforest-like green heart grows within Singapore’s Marina One Ascending to a building height of 27 meters, the hornbeam hedges will offer seasonal interest by changing color throughout the year. The turfed surfaces planted on the triangular building’s sloped facades will be accessible to passersby, who can use the space as an open lawn for rest and relaxation. Kö-Bogen II is slated to open in the spring of 2020. + Ingenhoven Architects Images via CADMAN

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Ingenhoven breaks ground on a hedge-wrapped green heart in Dsseldorf

Architects to transform two old railway yards into eco parks in Milan

May 14, 2019 by  
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OMA and Milan-based Laboratorio Permanente have won a competition to transform two abandoned railway yards in Milan into eco parks that will act as “ecological filters” for the car-centric city. Titled Agenti Climatici (Climatic Agents), the master plan would use the natural, air-purifying power of plants and the filtering capabilities of water to clean and cool the environment while adding new recreational spaces for the public. The project is part of a larger effort to redevelop disused post-industrial areas around the periphery of the city. The Agenti Climatici master plan addresses two railway yards: the 468,301-square-meter Scalo Farini on the north side of Milan and the 140,199-square-meter Scalo San Cristoforo on the south side of the city. The designers have designated Scalo Farini as the “green zone” that will consist of a large park capable of cooling the hot winds from the southwest and reducing air pollution . Scalo San Cristoforo has been dubbed the “blue zone” after the designers’ plan to turn the railway yard into a linear waterway that will naturally purify runoff and create cooling microclimates. “In a moment of dramatic environmental transformation and permanent economic uncertainty, our priorities have changed,” said OMA partner Ippolito Pestellini Laparelli. “The most valuable currency is no longer ‘brick’ — the built — but rather the climatic conditions that cities will be able to provide and ensure for their citizens. The city of the 20th century, with its high energy consumption , must be overcome by reconsidering the principles that have marked urban development since the classical era.” Related: CRA grows a sustainable pavilion out of mushrooms in just 6 weeks For adaptability, only the public elements of the Farini park will be fixed — including the waterways, greenery and bridges — while the location of the buildings and their programming will be contingent on the city’s future economic development. The master plan also calls for Milan’s longest expressway bicycle lane alongside a new tram line and metro stations. + OMA + Laboratorio Permanente Images via OMA and Laboratorio Permanente

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Architects to transform two old railway yards into eco parks in Milan

KOGAA creates an energy self-sufficient City Cell in response to climate change

November 2, 2018 by  
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Galvanized by the growing debate on climate change , Brno-based KOGAA Architectural Studio and NEXT Institute Research Platform have teamed up to create the City Cell Prototype (CCP), a pop-up installation that serves as a testing ground for ways cities can combat climate extremes. Completed this year, the temporary pavilion of nearly 300 square feet is presently located at Malinovsky Square in Brno, Czech Republic’s second-largest city. Built of timber and powered by solar energy, the City Cell Prototype is a multifunctional design that includes rainwater reuse, urban greenery, human shelter and educational opportunities. The City Cell Prototype is primarily constructed from pre-dried KVH timber, a material that has the added benefit of not requiring any additional protective coatings. Elevated off the ground on footings, the wooden structure is centered on a tree set inside a “biofilter.” To make the pavilion look inviting to the public, KOGAA inserted low-slung seating and made the all-timber envelope as transparent as possible using slatted wood screens and two entrances. In addition to the tree, planters have been installed on both ends of the structure, with one wall comprising rows of street-facing planters. Despite the pavilion’s minimalist appearance, the structure features multiple systems that work together to ensure energy self-sufficiency. The sloped roofs, which are made from a translucent material to let light through, are angled to channel rainwater into the centrally located biofilter, where the runoff is then filtered through settling and phyto-processes. Once filtered, the rainwater is stored in tanks and then pumped up to a drip irrigation system connected to the pavilion’s planters. The water pump is powered by solar energy harvested from photovoltaic panels mounted to the roof; solar power also provides electricity for the LED lighting system. Related: An experimental greenhouse pops up at a busy Copenhagen intersection “Together with the vertical greenery, the biofilter allows water retention and evaporation, allowing the surrounding microclimate to cool down,” the architects explained. “Its shape develops from the need to provide shading, collect water and the intent to create a spatial communication between the new object and the existing square, also achieved through the two-sided openness.” After the testing period, the CCP could be included in more permanent projects. + KOGAA Architectural Studio Images via Boys Play Nice

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KOGAA creates an energy self-sufficient City Cell in response to climate change

Bio-Pyramid turns Egypt’s ancient pyramids into a gigantic desertification-fighting skyscraper

March 31, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Bio-Pyramid turns Egypt’s ancient pyramids into a gigantic desertification-fighting skyscraper Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “eVolo” , Bio-Pyramid , bio-pyramid skyscraper , condensation trip , desertification , egypt , eVolo 2015 skyscraper competition , evolo skyscraper competition , great pyramids , microclimate , mixed-use , pyramid , Sahara desert , vertical farming

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Bio-Pyramid turns Egypt’s ancient pyramids into a gigantic desertification-fighting skyscraper

RRA’s Micro Cluster Cabins Give Traditional Pitched Roofs a Modern Twist in Norway

October 14, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of RRA’s Micro Cluster Cabins Give Traditional Pitched Roofs a Modern Twist in Norway Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cabin village , cabins , fully-glazed gable ends , gable-roof , micro cabins , Micro Cluster Cabins , microclimate , norway , pitched roof , Reiulf Ramstad Architects , tiny cabins , tiny houses , Vestfold , Wood

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RRA’s Micro Cluster Cabins Give Traditional Pitched Roofs a Modern Twist in Norway

Shigeru Ban Wins Bid to Design the Tainan Museum of Fine Arts

September 16, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Shigeru Ban Wins Bid to Design the Tainan Museum of Fine Arts Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , fractal shading , microclimate , natural light , natural ventilation , pentagon shaped roof , phoenix blossom , rainwater harvesting , shigeru ban , tainan , Tainan Museum of FIne Arts , Taiwan

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Shigeru Ban Wins Bid to Design the Tainan Museum of Fine Arts

The Slabs: Gorgeous Italian Pavilion Crowned with a Sky Garden Proposed for Milan Expo 2015

May 7, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of The Slabs: Gorgeous Italian Pavilion Crowned with a Sky Garden Proposed for Milan Expo 2015 Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: BE.ST , Daylighting , eco design , glass , green design , italy , marble , MenoMenoPiu Architects , microclimate , Milan , rooftop garden , sky garden , sustainable design , world expo 2015        

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The Slabs: Gorgeous Italian Pavilion Crowned with a Sky Garden Proposed for Milan Expo 2015

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