NASA scientists identify unknown microbes aboard International Space Station

January 2, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on NASA scientists identify unknown microbes aboard International Space Station

Hurricane Harvey couldn’t stand in the way of a groundbreaking experiment on the International Space Station (ISS) this summer. NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson and the Genes in Space-3 team have identified unknown microbes in space . Their work could help future astronauts monitor crew health and diagnose ailments in real time – without needing to send a sample back to Earth. Astronaut Kate Rubins sequenced DNA for the first time in microgravity in 2016 , which NASA described as a game changer. But scientists knew what the samples contained, as they’d been prepared on Earth. This past summer, the Genes in Space-3 team conducted an experiment with samples collected in space to see if they could sequence unknown organisms. Whitson was in the process of performing the investigation when Hurricane Harvey hit – and the Earth-based principal investigator Sarah Wallace was in Houston. The Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama came to the rescue, enabling the two women to communicate by patching Wallace’s cell phone into the space to ground loops. With a hurricane whirling outside, the experiment continued. Related: The International Space Station is a germophobe’s nightmare “Right away, we saw one microorganism pop up, and then a second one, and they were things that we find all the time on the space station,” Wallace said in a statement. The samples were sent to Earth, so biochemical and sequencing tests could confirm the ISS findings, which they did: the results were the same on our planet as in orbit. “As a microbiologist, my goal is really so that when we go and we move beyond ISS and we’re headed towards Mars or the moon or wherever we are headed to, we have a process that the crew can have that great understanding of the environment based on molecular technology,” said Wallace in a NASA Johnson video . She was the lead author on a study published in Scientific Reports in December. A team of 21 scientists from NASA and institutions in the United States and United Kingdom collaborated on the article. Via NASA Images via NASA Johnson on YouTube , NASA , and Rachel Barry

The rest is here:
NASA scientists identify unknown microbes aboard International Space Station

Remarkable bacteria survives extremely harsh conditions by eating nothing but air

December 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Remarkable bacteria survives extremely harsh conditions by eating nothing but air

Scientists have discovered a strange new bacteria in the Antarctic that can survive the planet’s most extreme conditions just by breathing air. The discovery could help us find alien life in space. Scientists found microbes in Antarctica that exist on a diet of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen, in places where other life forms could never survive. But if life can survive in the extreme temperatures, darkness and strong radiation found in Antarctica, it stands to reason that life could survive in similar conditions in space. Related: Scientists warn thawing soil could suddenly unleash deadly pathogens unseen in centuries “The big question has been how the microbes can survive when there is little water, the soils are very low in organic carbon and there is very little capacity to produce energy from the Sun via photosynthesis during the winter darkness,” said Belinda Ferrari, lead researcher of the University of New South Wales team who made the discovery. Via Science Alert Lead image via Desposit Photos ( 1 , 2 )

Originally posted here:
Remarkable bacteria survives extremely harsh conditions by eating nothing but air

University of Queensland scientists uncover an ‘explosion’ of new life forms

September 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on University of Queensland scientists uncover an ‘explosion’ of new life forms

The Tree of Life just got bigger. University of Queensland scientists found thousands of organisms that don’t into any known phylum. They acquired 7,280 bacterial genomes and 623 archaeal genomes, raising the number of known genomes by nearly 10 percent. Scientist Gene Tyson, who was part of the effort, said, “The real value of these genomes is that many are evolutionarily distinct from previously recovered genomes.” There are some 80,000 genomes in genome repositories, according to the university. This new work, published online in September by Nature Microbiology , recovers almost 8,000 genomes – what the university called an explosion in the number of life forms we know about. Related: Tree of Life redesigned to reflect thousands of new species The scientists drew on the technique metagenomics, which is relatively new, according to Futurism. Researchers sequenced all the DNA in a sample – including water, feces, or dirt – to generate a metagenome. They were then able to reconstruct individual genomes of new bacteria and new archaea . Around a third of those microorganisms were distinct, allowing the researchers to create three archaeal phyla and 17 bacterial phyla. Microbes can be hard to scrutinize; scientists can only culture under one percent, according to Tyson. Utilizing metagenomics may offer a new method of studying microorganisms researchers can’t grow in a laboratory – and such research could be vital as microbes are opposing our life-saving antibiotics , and we face antibiotic resistance . According to Futurism, it’s possible some of these new species could be used in better antibiotics. And there could be more discoveries to come – study lead author Donovan Parks said in a statement, “We anticipate that processing of environmental samples deposited in other public repositories will add tens of thousands of additional microbial genomes to the tree of life.” Via Futurism and the University of Queensland Images via Pixabay and Parks, Donovan, et al.

See the rest here:
University of Queensland scientists uncover an ‘explosion’ of new life forms

Ancient microbes survive inside massive cave crystals for 50,000 years

February 20, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Ancient microbes survive inside massive cave crystals for 50,000 years

Scientists have found strange, ancient microbes in Mexico’s Naica crystal caves that could be around 50,000 years old. Although the caves are so hot they’ve been described as hell – while also being so magical they’ve been described as Fairyland – the microbes have survived for thousands of years trapped in crystals . A biologist who studied the microbes referred to them as super life. Scientists discovered 40 different microbe strains and some viruses in the caves. The microbes are so bizarre that even their closest relatives are genetically 10 percent different, which is about as far away as mushrooms and humans, according to NASA Astrobiology Institute director Penelope Boston, who recently presented the research. The dormant microbes survived on minerals like manganese and iron. Related: Researchers discover that architecture has an impact on which microbes thrive around you The Naica caves are a great example of an extreme environment. Found by miners only around 100 years ago, the caves were isolated from the rest of the world for centuries until a mining company commenced drilling. According to Phys.org, some of the caves are as colossal as cathedrals , and are covered in crystals. But the magnificent caves are so sweltering the researchers could work for just about 20 minutes before retreating to a cool room around 100 degrees Fahrenheit. They wore inexpensive space suits and kept ice packs on their bodies. The find doesn’t claim the prize for oldest extreme life – years ago scientists wrote about living microbes trapped in salt and ice that may be around half a million years old. But Boston told the BBC the microbes her team found are extraordinary because “they are not very closely related to anything in the known genetic databases” and scientists can add the recently found microbes “to this atlas of possibilities that we can apply to different planetary settings.” The findings draw on nine years of research, but have not yet been published in a journal. Boston aims to run more genetic tests on the microbes, but did present the find at the recent American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in Boston, Massachusetts late last week. Via the BBC and Phys.org Images via Wikimedia Commons ( 1 , 2 )

Originally posted here: 
Ancient microbes survive inside massive cave crystals for 50,000 years

Researchers discover that architecture has an impact on which microbes thrive around you

September 29, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Researchers discover that architecture has an impact on which microbes thrive around you

Microbes: our bodies are made up of them, our environment is teeming with them, and when they get out of balance, things go bad quickly . And while most of us are aware of the impact our diet and antibiotic use has on the bacteria, fungi and viruses that surround us, it’s a pretty safe bet that most of us haven’t considered how design impacts these microbes. But new research from the University of Oregon suggests that design has a vital influence on the balance of microbes in any given space, and the balance can shift from room to room depending on the design. Given the fact that humans spend a vast  majority of their lives indoors, it could mean big things for our health. Read the rest of Researchers discover that architecture has an impact on which microbes thrive around you

View post:
Researchers discover that architecture has an impact on which microbes thrive around you

INFOGRAPHIC: How Ecosystem Services Benefit Agricultural Productivity

May 20, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on INFOGRAPHIC: How Ecosystem Services Benefit Agricultural Productivity

There exists a fabulous symbiosis in nature between a healthy ecosystem and the diversity of life that flourishes in its vicinity. From microbes and mycelium to insects and birds, through to plants and even people, all benefit from an area that is rich in biodiversity and natural balance . Bioversity International has created an infographic that shows just how important it is to maintain and encourage this kind of balance, as well as tips on ways to ensure it exists in your own region, be that through crop rotation or planting native flower species to encourage pollinators  to visit. Check it out after the break! Read the rest of INFOGRAPHIC: How Ecosystem Services Benefit Agricultural Productivity Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: agriculture , air , Biodiversity , ecosystem , ecosystems , microbes , pollination , pollinators , water issues

See the original post here: 
INFOGRAPHIC: How Ecosystem Services Benefit Agricultural Productivity

Methane-Producing Bacteria May Have Caused Earth’s Largest Mass Extinction

April 1, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Methane-Producing Bacteria May Have Caused Earth’s Largest Mass Extinction

Scientists have identified five mass extinctions over the course of the Earth’s history. While many are familiar with the cataclysmic event that wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, the most dramatic die-off happened during the Permian 252 million years ago. According to research from MIT , a microbe named Methanosarcina may have been responsible for the demise of 90 percent of marine species and 70 percent of land vertebrates. The tiny organisms multiplied in such numbers that they were able to bombard the atmosphere with methane , causing the oceans to acidify and turn the climate into a hostile environment for life. Read the rest of Methane-Producing Bacteria May Have Caused Earth’s Largest Mass Extinction Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: archaea , Biodiversity , CO2 , Dinosaur , global warming , greenhouse gas , greg fournier , mass extinction , methane , methanosarcina , microbes , microorganisms , MIT , ocean acidification , permian , siberia , volcanic activity        

See more here: 
Methane-Producing Bacteria May Have Caused Earth’s Largest Mass Extinction

Panda Poop Microbes Could Lead to Biofuel Production that Doesn’t Use Corn

September 11, 2013 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Panda Poop Microbes Could Lead to Biofuel Production that Doesn’t Use Corn

Pandas at the Memphis Zoo may be contributing to their upkeep soon thanks to research from the Mississippi State University . This week, scientists presented research at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) , where they claimed that biofuels could be made from panda poo microbes instead of corn. Read the rest of Panda Poop Microbes Could Lead to Biofuel Production that Doesn’t Use Corn Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) , biofuel production , biofuels , corn based biofuel , mississippi university , panda , pandas , poo , poop power        

Originally posted here:
Panda Poop Microbes Could Lead to Biofuel Production that Doesn’t Use Corn

Energy Box Passive House is an Earthquake-Proof Sustainable Home in Northern Italy

September 11, 2013 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Energy Box Passive House is an Earthquake-Proof Sustainable Home in Northern Italy

Read the rest of Energy Box Passive House is an Earthquake-Proof Sustainable Home in Northern Italy Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: carbon footprint , earthquake proof home , earthquakes Italy , eco design , Energy Box House , Energy Box L’Aquila , green architecture Italy , green design , low carbon footprint , passivhaus , Pierluigi Bonomo , Prefab Housing , prefab housing Italy , sustainable design        

The rest is here:
Energy Box Passive House is an Earthquake-Proof Sustainable Home in Northern Italy

Antarctica’s Taylor Glacier Appears to Be Bleeding with a Five-Story Crimson Waterfall

May 17, 2013 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Antarctica’s Taylor Glacier Appears to Be Bleeding with a Five-Story Crimson Waterfall

There are some phenomena in nature that inspire tears of joy, some that spark a sense of awe, and then there are those that send chills up your spine. The Taylor Glacier in Antarctica, which was discovered in the McMurdo Dry Valley in 1911, appears to be bleeding. The bright red waterfall, dubbed “Blood Falls,” is nearly five stories high, and it seeps through a crack in the ice. Geologists first believed that the color of the water came from algae, but the hue is in fact caused by a small body of water containing a hidden lake of microbes . Read the rest of Antarctica’s Taylor Glacier Appears to Be Bleeding with a Five-Story Crimson Waterfall Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: antarctica , atlas obscura , blood , blood falls , extremophiles , Iron , lake , mcmurdo dry valley , microbes , red , slate , taylor glacier        

See the original post here:
Antarctica’s Taylor Glacier Appears to Be Bleeding with a Five-Story Crimson Waterfall

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 858 access attempts in the last 7 days.