Is U.S. car ownership on the decline?

February 17, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Is U.S. car ownership on the decline?

Peak oil might be less of a problem now that America has reached peak car. According to research by Michigan’s Sustainable Worldwide Transportation , both the ownership of light-duty vehicles such as cars, SUVs, vans, and pickup trucks, plus the corresponding distance driven, began to wane in 2006. The reasons aren’t clear. “Friends and foes of car-centric planning have been fervently debating whether the post-2006 driving decline was a recession-driven trough or a reflection of the fact that younger Americans, with their Uber -hailing aversion to car ownership, were truly driving the automobile age to an early grave,” wrote Andrew Small in Citylab , a blog from the Atlantic , on Tuesday. There are hints —but just barely—of a rebound. Vehicle-ownership rates per person and per household rose by 1.4 percent from 2012 to 2015. Similarly, the distance driven per person and per household increased by 2.1 percent between 2013 and 2015. Related: Limits to growth prediction of imminent societal collapse As Smalls points out, all eyes are now on President Donald Trump. “The new administration’s pledge to roll back environmental and safety regulations might conceivably (eventually) make new car ownership cheaper and lure some Millennials back behind the wheel. (Especially if federal support for mass transit drops off the face of the earth.),” Smalls said. “On the other hand, the president’s proposed 20 percent tax on goods from Mexico would do the opposite.” TL;DR: We’re going to have to wait a few years to see how things shake out. Photo by Benjamin Child Via Citylab

Read the original post: 
Is U.S. car ownership on the decline?

1,700 Flint residents sue the EPA over tainted water

February 1, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on 1,700 Flint residents sue the EPA over tainted water

More than 1,700 residents of Flint, Michigan are seeking class action status for a lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency, claiming it mismanaged the water crisis in the city. The suit was filed in a U.S. District court in Michigan on Monday, and alleges that the agency failed to warn them of the dangers of the tainted water , and did nothing to pressure state or local authorities to address the issue. The plaintiffs are seeking a collective $722 million in damages. According to Reuters , part of the 30-page lawsuit reads, “This case involves a major failure on all levels of government to protect the health and safety of the public. Local, state and federal agencies and employees, working individually and at times in concert with each other, mismanaged this environmental catastrophe.” The EPA had not yet issued a comment on the court action at the time of publication. The water crisis resulted in thousands of children being exposed to water laced with lead , which is known to stunt cognitive development and cause a number of chronic health issues. Researchers believe there is no safe lower limit for lead exposure. Related: EPA regional head steps down after agency rules response to Flint water crisis “inadequate” While the city has switched back to a safe water source as of October 2015, it’s been a struggle for residents to access clean water in the meantime. The previous water system caused irreparable damage to the city’s pipes, and replacing them has been a very slow and expensive process. Though filters are available for residential taps, many are still limiting themselves to bottled water out of fear that contamination may still seep through. Via Reuters Images via Steve Johnson and Wikipedia

View original here:
1,700 Flint residents sue the EPA over tainted water

Michigan just made it illegal for cities to ban plastic bags

January 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Michigan just made it illegal for cities to ban plastic bags

Michigan just passed a new law that prohibits local governments from banning, regulating, or taxing the use of plastic bags and other containers. That’s right: it’s a statewide ban on banning plastic bags . The law was likely aimed at shutting down a local ordinance in Ann Arbor’s Washtenaw County, which would have instituted a 10 cent fee on grocery store bags. Plastic bag bans, of course, are intended to help keep pollution out of the environment. The flimsy plastic bags used in many grocery stores are not biodegradable and tend to find their way into waterways and the ocean, where they break down into smaller pieces that poison fish, seabirds, and marine animals. Even worse, they can take hundreds of years to break down in the environment – or even longer in a landfill . Related: Morocco just officially banned plastic bags Given the environmental impact, what possible reason could Michigan have for shutting down plastic bag bans within the state? In a word: money. Businesses complain that bans or taxes on bags are simply too high a burden for their everyday operations. Michigan isn’t the only state to have taken this approach, either: Idaho, Arizona, and Missouri have all enacted similar laws in recent years. Hopefully, as plastic bag bans become more common, it will become clear that industry claims about the cost and complexity of implementing the bans simply aren’t true. So far in the US, plastic bags have already been banned throughout California and in cities including Portland, Seattle, Austin, and Chicago. If these major cities and the country’s largest state can adapt to paper and reusable bags, surely Michigan could do so as well. Via The Washington Post Images via Randy Wick and Eric

Here is the original: 
Michigan just made it illegal for cities to ban plastic bags

Michigan just made it illegal for cities to ban plastic bags

January 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Michigan just made it illegal for cities to ban plastic bags

Michigan just passed a new law that prohibits local governments from banning, regulating, or taxing the use of plastic bags and other containers. That’s right: it’s a statewide ban on banning plastic bags . The law was likely aimed at shutting down a local ordinance in Ann Arbor’s Washtenaw County, which would have instituted a 10 cent fee on grocery store bags. Plastic bag bans, of course, are intended to help keep pollution out of the environment. The flimsy plastic bags used in many grocery stores are not biodegradable and tend to find their way into waterways and the ocean, where they break down into smaller pieces that poison fish, seabirds, and marine animals. Even worse, they can take hundreds of years to break down in the environment – or even longer in a landfill . Related: Morocco just officially banned plastic bags Given the environmental impact, what possible reason could Michigan have for shutting down plastic bag bans within the state? In a word: money. Businesses complain that bans or taxes on bags are simply too high a burden for their everyday operations. Michigan isn’t the only state to have taken this approach, either: Idaho, Arizona, and Missouri have all enacted similar laws in recent years. Hopefully, as plastic bag bans become more common, it will become clear that industry claims about the cost and complexity of implementing the bans simply aren’t true. So far in the US, plastic bags have already been banned throughout California and in cities including Portland, Seattle, Austin, and Chicago. If these major cities and the country’s largest state can adapt to paper and reusable bags, surely Michigan could do so as well. Via The Washington Post Images via Randy Wick and Eric

Go here to see the original: 
Michigan just made it illegal for cities to ban plastic bags

Native American tribe is fighting against the Pilgrim Pipeline in New Jersey

January 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Native American tribe is fighting against the Pilgrim Pipeline in New Jersey

As oil and gas companies race to plan more pipelines to criss-cross America, conservationists are similarly ramping up their efforts to resist the environmentally destructive projects, and one such controversy in New Jersey is heating up quickly . The planned Pilgrim Pipeline would carry crude oil back and forth along the 178 miles from Albany, New York, to New Jersey’s Linden Harbor. The pipeline’s proposed route cuts through forests and a drinking water reservoir, prompting members of the Ramapough Lunaape Nation to organize a resistance camp, similar to the months-long backlash against the Dakota Access Pipeline in Standing Rock, North Dakota. While that struggle has been long and difficult, the Ramapough Lunaape in New Jersey will face a different and perhaps even more challenging fight against corporate interests, for a number of reasons. As is often the case with resistance efforts led by indigenous people , the Ramapough Lunaape must first defend their right to protest. Last week, the New Jersey town of Mahwah issued summonses against the protesters for setting up a camp and erecting protest signs without permits, even though the activity is all taking place on tribal land. One of the key obstacles for the Ramapough Lunaape is that their nation is not recognized by the federal government, so they are not protected in the same way. The Ramapough Lunaape Nation is instead only recognized at the state level in New Jersey and New York. It doesn’t take an expert to understand how this issue will complicate their fight against the proposed pipeline . Related: US Army blocks Dakota Access Pipeline in major victory for protesters The tribe has made numerous attempts to gain federal recognition, but those efforts have all failed. One such bid, in 1993, was struck down after Donald Trump (yep, that guy) campaigned against the nation’s recognition in order to eliminate the possibility of competition for his casino in Atlantic City. The tribe hasn’t given up, though, and an ongoing petition is still active to collect signature in support of adding the Ramapough Lunaape Nation to the list of federal recognized tribes. The Pilgrim Pipeline has been in planning for more than two years, and local communities along its proposed route have been protesting the whole time. The planned route would loosely follow the New York State Thruway and I-287 and then through North Jersey’s environmentally sensitive Highlands. Protesters are worried about the pipeline’s proximity to the Highlands reservoirs, which provide water to 5 million New Jersey residents. Much like other pipeline projects across the country, the developers Pilgrim Pipeline Holdings have pledged to go “full steam ahead” despite the environmental and public health concerns. Via Grist Images via Northjersey Pipeline Walkers and  Pilgrim Pipeline

View original post here: 
Native American tribe is fighting against the Pilgrim Pipeline in New Jersey

Native American tribe is fighting against the Pilgrim Pipeline in New Jersey

January 2, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Native American tribe is fighting against the Pilgrim Pipeline in New Jersey

As oil and gas companies race to plan more pipelines to criss-cross America, conservationists are similarly ramping up their efforts to resist the environmentally destructive projects, and one such controversy in New Jersey is heating up quickly . The planned Pilgrim Pipeline would carry crude oil back and forth along the 178 miles from Albany, New York, to New Jersey’s Linden Harbor. The pipeline’s proposed route cuts through forests and a drinking water reservoir, prompting members of the Ramapough Lunaape Nation to organize a resistance camp, similar to the months-long backlash against the Dakota Access Pipeline in Standing Rock, North Dakota. While that struggle has been long and difficult, the Ramapough Lunaape in New Jersey will face a different and perhaps even more challenging fight against corporate interests, for a number of reasons. As is often the case with resistance efforts led by indigenous people , the Ramapough Lunaape must first defend their right to protest. Last week, the New Jersey town of Mahwah issued summonses against the protesters for setting up a camp and erecting protest signs without permits, even though the activity is all taking place on tribal land. One of the key obstacles for the Ramapough Lunaape is that their nation is not recognized by the federal government, so they are not protected in the same way. The Ramapough Lunaape Nation is instead only recognized at the state level in New Jersey and New York. It doesn’t take an expert to understand how this issue will complicate their fight against the proposed pipeline . Related: US Army blocks Dakota Access Pipeline in major victory for protesters The tribe has made numerous attempts to gain federal recognition, but those efforts have all failed. One such bid, in 1993, was struck down after Donald Trump (yep, that guy) campaigned against the nation’s recognition in order to eliminate the possibility of competition for his casino in Atlantic City. The tribe hasn’t given up, though, and an ongoing petition is still active to collect signature in support of adding the Ramapough Lunaape Nation to the list of federal recognized tribes. The Pilgrim Pipeline has been in planning for more than two years, and local communities along its proposed route have been protesting the whole time. The planned route would loosely follow the New York State Thruway and I-287 and then through North Jersey’s environmentally sensitive Highlands. Protesters are worried about the pipeline’s proximity to the Highlands reservoirs, which provide water to 5 million New Jersey residents. Much like other pipeline projects across the country, the developers Pilgrim Pipeline Holdings have pledged to go “full steam ahead” despite the environmental and public health concerns. Via Grist Images via Northjersey Pipeline Walkers and  Pilgrim Pipeline

Read the original:
Native American tribe is fighting against the Pilgrim Pipeline in New Jersey

Shining lasers on human blood could help detect tumors

September 6, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Shining lasers on human blood could help detect tumors

A team of University of Michigan researchers have discovered how to use lasers to see intricate cell structure and activity in human blood. Shining laser light on whole human blood combined with a fluorescent dye reveals incredible detail, according to the researchers, leading to hope the technology can improve how doctors monitor cell activity in the body, including how to identify tumors. The researchers, led by Biomedical Engineering professor Xudong (Sherman) Fan, tested out their technique by shining a laser into a cavity containing whole human blood mixed with Indocyanine green, a medical dye used in diagnostic tests. By examining the light reflected back at them, they discovered they could see changes happening to the cells all the way down to the molecular level. Related: Scientists reprogram E. coli bacteria to attack tumor cells The precise picture allows observers to see the even smallest changes and to tune out unnecessary background details. Even though the technique has only been used outside the human body, the researchers are hopeful it can be applied in the future to living tissue . Medical teams could be able to more accurately monitor cell activity in the body, as well as see how widely blood vessel-fed tumors expand when performing surgery to remove them. + University of Michigan Via Daily Mail Images via Pixabay , University of Michigan

Go here to see the original: 
Shining lasers on human blood could help detect tumors

Fish with "human-like teeth" spotted in Michigan lakes

August 18, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Fish with "human-like teeth" spotted in Michigan lakes

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) recently reported finding fish with “human-like teeth” in southeastern Michigan lakes. Anglers spotted red-bellied pacu in Lake St. Clair and near Port Huron. While the sight of these unusual fish may be good for a giggle or a gasp, their presence in Michigan lakes points to a deeper issue. These unusual fish sport teeth eerily reminiscent of humans’ so they can eat seeds and nuts. While they’re not native to Michigan, DNR said they’re not invasive. They’re imported from South America, and their presence in Michigan lakes likely means aquarium owners dumped their pet fish into the lakes. Related: This friendly fish has visited a Japanese diver for 25 years The DNR took the opportunity to remind aquarium owners it’s illegal to release their fish without a permit, and that pet release of any kind is rarely the humane option. Aquatic Species and Regulatory Affairs Unit manager Nick Popoff said in a press release, “Pets released from confined, artificial environments are poorly equipped to fend off predators and may be unable to successfully forage for food or find shelter. Those that do succeed in the wild can spread exotic diseases to native animals. In the worst-case scenario, released animals can thrive and reproduce, upsetting natural ecosystems to the degree that these former pets become invasive species .” In the wild, the pacus probably wouldn’t survive frigid Michigan winters, but DNR said climate change could “increase the possibility” of their survival through the winter. The pacus may have been dumped because they outgrew their tanks or started to eat other aquarium fish, said Paige Filice, who works with the Reduce Invasive Pet and PLant Escapes (RIPPLE). She suggested that rather than dumping the fish in lakes, pacu owners could donate their fish to a zoo, aquarium, environmental learning center, or another hobbyist. She said some pet stores might take the fish back if an owner can no longer care for the pacu. + Michigan Department of Natural Resources Images via Michigan Department of Natural Resources , Henrik Carl, Natural History Museum of Denmark, and Wikimedia Commons

More here: 
Fish with "human-like teeth" spotted in Michigan lakes

Fierce winds in Michigan carve otherworldly sculptures out of sand

February 25, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Fierce winds in Michigan carve otherworldly sculptures out of sand

Read the rest of Fierce winds in Michigan carve otherworldly sculptures out of sand

See the original post:
Fierce winds in Michigan carve otherworldly sculptures out of sand

Mysterious tarry goo falls from the sky in Michigan

February 19, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Mysterious tarry goo falls from the sky in Michigan

A mysterious black substance that’s fallen from the sky has residents of Harrison Township, Michigan concerned for their safety. On Sunday, residents of at least six local homes woke to find their cars and homes splattered with the strange material. The substance resembles bird droppings, but no one seems to know what it is or if it’s hazardous. Read the rest of Mysterious tarry goo falls from the sky in Michigan

View original here:
Mysterious tarry goo falls from the sky in Michigan

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 888 access attempts in the last 7 days.