Benthem Crouwel Architects named designer of new Paris airport metro station

May 26, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Benthem Crouwel Architects named designer of new Paris airport metro station

In Paris , a major expansion project is underway on the city’s metro system. The new Grand Paris Express Ligne 17 is expected to be completed by 2024, and will include nine metro stations on its nearly 17-mile (27 km) route, which will serve two major airports. Société du Grand Paris , the agency overseeing the new metro line, has chosen Benthem Crouwel Architects to design the new metro station at the Charles de Gaulle Airport, which boasts more foreign destinations than any other airport in the world. The Dutch architectural firm was chosen to design the metro station at Charles de Gaulle Airport in part because of their experience with aviation hubs . The firm has been the architect of Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport, main the main international airport of the Netherlands, since 1982. In 1995, the team designed the underground train station at Schiphol, so they are primed to take on the largest international airport in Paris. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=6&v=UEhseAPKs40 In addition, Benthem Crouwel Architects will also take on the job of designing three other above-ground metro stations and viaduct of the Ligne 18 , which is the metro line that will connect Orly Airport and Versailles. Ligne 18 will stretch a total of 31 miles (50 km) with 13 metro stations along the way. That line is expected to open in 2023. Related: Kengo Kuma wins design competition for new Paris metro station The almost 17-mile Ligne 17 will cost $2 billion (1.8 billion euros) and will add nine new metro stations to the greater Paris area. + Benthem Crouwel Architects Images via Benthem Crouwel Architects , Sébastien d’Halloy for Société du Grand Paris , and Didier Baertschiger

Original post: 
Benthem Crouwel Architects named designer of new Paris airport metro station

Vintage Eichler home receives open and airy remodel that preserves its roots

May 26, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Vintage Eichler home receives open and airy remodel that preserves its roots

It was important to both the owners and the Klopf team to honor the original Eichler design, but to also bring the space into the 21st century. Much of the original mahogany paneling and courtyard zinc wall panels were preserved, as the owners had special relationships to the textiles’ origins. White and gray accents let the wooden features shine as homages to the home’s history, including the specially built mahogany cabinetry which unites the kitchen and living room areas. Related: Mid-century Eichler home gets a bold remodel into the 21st century The old chimney flue was revitalized as a television nook and the tiny galley kitchen was opened up to create an inviting gathering place, creating a more modern vibe. The master bedroom was also expanded to engulf two small rooms, allowing the owners to transform the larger suite to include an open closet and dressing area. The laundry appliances were also given a more spacious spot, eliminating an unsightly mechanical room. The home’s courtyard could very well be the owners’ pride and joy, and it retained much of its original glory. Zinc wall panels seamlessly transition from outside to in, accenting the large glass features beautifully. The modern, minimalist approach somehow works very well with the midcentury history of the space, creating a home that is both comfortable and timeless. +K lopf Architecture Images via Mariko Reed

The rest is here: 
Vintage Eichler home receives open and airy remodel that preserves its roots

This solar-powered Green Village in South Africa will be completely car-free

May 26, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on This solar-powered Green Village in South Africa will be completely car-free

Architecture firm Swisatec just announced plans to build a self-contained “Green Village” in Cape Town, South Africa that will be completely car-free and powered by solar energy. Taking up approximately 40 hectares of land, the village will contain 1,000 apartment units, as well as all the amenities its residents need to conduct their daily business, including doctors’ offices, boutiques, schools, and more. The new Blue Rock Village isn’t going to be developed completely from scratch: instead, it’s an upgrade of the existing Blue Rock Resort, set beside an iconic Cape Town lake at a former quarry site. While cars won’t be needed to travel through the Village, residents still need to find a way to get there – it’s a half-hour drive to Cape Town proper. The development will include underground parking for residents, tucking their cars out of sight until they need to travel. Related: Low-tech alarm protects South African slums from devastating fires The apartments available range from one to four bedrooms, and will be made completely from eco-friendly and nontoxic materials. All appliances will be A++ rated energy efficient, and the units will be lit throughout with LEDs . The buildings even include features to manage water usage and will be able to run on self-generated solar power . Swisatec estimates the project will cost a staggering 14 billion rand, or $900 million US. Construction will start in September 2016. + Blue Rock Village

Read more here:
This solar-powered Green Village in South Africa will be completely car-free

Bad Behavior has blocked 1931 access attempts in the last 7 days.