The Basics of Recycling Scrap Metal for Money

October 27, 2021 by  
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Originally written by Virginia Buechel, of iScrap App. Most of us know the value of… The post The Basics of Recycling Scrap Metal for Money appeared first on Earth911.

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The Basics of Recycling Scrap Metal for Money

Maven Moment: Shut the Lights!

September 29, 2021 by  
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When I was growing up, my grandmother owned a four-family house in Brooklyn. My family… The post Maven Moment: Shut the Lights! appeared first on Earth911.

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Maven Moment: Shut the Lights!

Famous Amsterdam canal gets a 3D-printed smart bridge

August 4, 2021 by  
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Amsterdam’s oldest neighborhood is getting a high-tech upgrade thanks to 3D-printing company MX3D and design firm Joris Laarman Lab. The team recently unveiled a stainless steel, 3D-printed smart bridge that will be placed over one of the city’s historic bridges in the Red Light District. The bridge will be equipped with digital technology to analyze crowd behavior. The stainless steel bridge has the capacity to hold a minimum of 19.5 tons, more than even what it was designed for. According to MX3D’s CEO, the success of the bridge project marks only the beginning for the company’s metal-printing technology.  Related: Award-winning redesign of the Brooklyn Bridge puts the focus on pedestrians “This robotic technology finally allows larger optimized designs to be 3D printed in metal,” said Gijs van der Velden, CEO and co-founder of MX3D. “This causes significant weight reduction and reduced impact for parts manufactured in the tooling, oil & gas and construction industries.” The project took four robots and over 6,000 kilograms of stainless steel to complete, but the most innovative aspect, arguably, comes in the form of the bridge’s smart sensors. Powered by structural measurements like strain, rotation, load, displacement and vibration, the bridge’s sensors collect data in real time. The accurate computer model helps engineers to not only keep tabs on the bridge’s overall health (for example, how it changes over its lifespan) but also better understand elements like overtourism , air quality and temperature. There’s an artificial intelligence component to it as well, because the sensor data can also be used to “teach” the bridge to essentially understand what is happening to it. The first step is to teach the bridge how to count how many people are crossing it and how quickly. “Evolution is a truly wonderful process that we try to harness in our work. Endlessly trying, refining, improving until slowly, something emerges that is so ingenious it looks like magic if you don’t know what went on before,” said Joris Laarman, owner of Joris Laarman Lab. “In our work, we try to capture some of that magic. Using emerging technology to develop objects and a visual language of the future that is informed by logic, we aim to make small leaps in that evolutionary process.” + Joris Laarman Lab + MX3D Via ArchDaily Photography by Thea van den Heuvel, Merlin Moritz, Jande G. Roen, Adriaan de Groot via MX3D

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Famous Amsterdam canal gets a 3D-printed smart bridge

Where Will All the Fidget Spinners Go?

June 29, 2017 by  
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If you haven’t been subject to the fidget spinner craze, those little toys everyone from schoolchildren to business execs can’t stop spinning, chances are high that you are in fact living under a rock. But like all good fads — Silly…

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Where Will All the Fidget Spinners Go?

How Many Times Can That Be Recycled?

June 15, 2017 by  
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I used to think that plastic water bottles could be infinitely recycled, that every time I tossed one into the blue bin, it eventually came out to be another plastic bottle. As it turns out, that’s not the case. Some materials can be recycled…

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How Many Times Can That Be Recycled?

Using Metals as Carbon Free Fuel Alternatives

January 22, 2016 by  
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Researchers are exploring the novel idea of using metals as fuels. This is not some new, exotic science-fiction material, but rather plentiful, ordinary metals such as iron that could be used in a novel way for storing and transporting renewable energy. According to a McGill University article, the research being led by Professor Jeffrey Bergthorson is proposing “a novel concept for using tiny metal particles – similar in size to fine flour or icing sugar – to power external-combustion engines.” Instead of using the chemical bonds with carbon, which are currently the basis of most fuels we presently use, metal powders could be used in a similar fashion and make use of energetic reactions to release energy when and where it is needed. The article describes the process: “Unlike the internal-combustion engines used in gasoline-powered cars, external-combustion engines use heat from an outside source to drive an engine. External-combustion engines, modern versions of the coal-fired steam locomotives that drove the industrial era, are widely used to generate power from nuclear, coal or biomass fuels in power stations.” We already speak of the “embodied energy” in a material as par of its overall sustainability profile. Materials that are energy intensive to produce, such as concrete and steel, are less preferable from a lifecycle perspective compared to a material like wood, which needs much less energy to gather and prepare. So the idea of using iron powder (or some other metal) as a fuel is not as impractical as it might seem at first. While we think of metal as non-combustible, fine metal can be burned (as anyone who has ever lit a piece of steel wool on fire can tell you). But transporting a load of iron dust is much less hazardous than loads of oil or liquified natural gas. Using metals as a fuel would require capturing the spent fuel in order to re-process it. Having clouds of rust floating in the air sounds like a dystopian future. But, in theory, processing the oxidized metal back into its pure state could be carried out repeatedly, re-using the same metal over and over. While the researchers are looking at all levels of energy use with this technology, from automotive uses on up, the idea of storing grid-scale energy or even transporting it from one location to another (refining metal near locations producing lots of energy, much the way aluminum processing presently takes place close to cheap electricity sources), and then transporting the metal to power plants for it to be burned to produce electricity. One potential drawback that probably requires further investigation is that metal is a much heavier substrate than carbon-based fuels are. If metal dust is to be used for transportation, how heavy is the fuel that needs to be carried for ordinary travel? But if existing combustion power plants could be adapted to use metal powder instead of coal or other fossil fuels, then much of the existing power generating infrastructure could be used, and power generation could continue to be in the same places it is now, using the same grid as is currently supplying electricity. Large scale power plants are also likely much easier to set up with the equipment necessary to do the capture of exhaust. via: Quirks and Quarks

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Using Metals as Carbon Free Fuel Alternatives

Vader 3D Printer Creates Objects with Molten Metal

November 6, 2013 by  
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Father and son inventors Scott and Zackery Vader have created a revolutionary 3D printer that can create designs out of molten metal! The Vader 3D printer uses molten aluminum in place of plastic, and it can easily create complex forms without the need for lasers or fancy anodizing processes. Read the rest of Vader 3D Printer Creates Objects with Molten Metal Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “Making” , 3D Print with metal , 3D printing , 3D printing with Metal , 3D printing with molten metal , advanced fabrication , Advanced Manufacturing , can you 3d print with metal , DIY , makers , molten metal project , Scott Vader , Vader 3D Printer , Zack Vader        

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Vader 3D Printer Creates Objects with Molten Metal

Op-Ed: Scrap Metal Is the Ore of the Future

September 25, 2013 by  
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One reader argues that scrap metal is the ore of the future.

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Op-Ed: Scrap Metal Is the Ore of the Future

Fishing for Energy Trolls Ports for Old Gear to Recycle, Convert to Energy

September 23, 2013 by  
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The U.S. commercial fishing industry adds a lot to the economy — and a lot of waste to the environment. Fishing for Energy’s solution? Free recycling of old and unusable fishing gear.

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Fishing for Energy Trolls Ports for Old Gear to Recycle, Convert to Energy

Can recycling gold help the metal regain its luster?

August 27, 2013 by  
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Emptying the world's vaults is one way to stretch gold supplies for decades. But here's a better long-term solution.

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Can recycling gold help the metal regain its luster?

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