New guest home in Estonia uses a weathered metal facade to blend into ancient castle ruins

February 1, 2019 by  
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Visitors to the the ruins of a 14th-century castle in Vastseliina, Estonia will now have a beautiful place to stay in this beautiful guest home by Estonian architects, Kaos Architects . The Pilgrims’ House was clad in a weathered steel to compliment the ancient ruins of a 14th-century castle. Located in southeastern Estonia, the complex is a medieval setting with the ruins of a 14th century castle and an old pub house tucked into the rolling green hills and valleys adjacent to the Piusa river. When tasked with designing a guest home for the unique space, the bucolic atmosphere prompted the architects to create something that would be modern and comfortable, but that would blend in seamlessly with the landscape as well as the older buildings on site. Related:Modern gabled guesthouse embraces passive solar in Australia Along with the idyllic landscape, the architects were also inspired by the castle’s long history . After a miracle was reported to have taken place there in 1353, the castle complex became a popular pilgrimage destination. Although in ruins today, the site is used as an “experience center” to welcome guests who would like to experience the medieval way of life. To create the new addition to the complex , the architects tucked the Pilgrims’ House into a deep slope in the landscape so that it would not block the view of the castle ruins. Partially hidden by bushes and trees, the center’s weathered metal facade was intentionally used so that it would compliment the red brick and granite of the ruins. On the interior of the building, the design went medieval through and through. High ceilings and wooden doors, brick floors and secret niches create a vibrant, fresh interior with plenty of medieval features such as the steel chandeliers. Various small windows are reminiscent of early castles, offering scenic views while providing the utmost in privacy. In one room, a jet black wall showcases white graphics that were inspired by old engravings, featuring the area’s long history. Guests will enjoy a stay in the Pilgrim’s House where the personnel is dressed in medieval clothing and serve traditional fare. Although the guest rooms are quite humble, they do have hints of modern comforts such as a claw foot bathtub and simple Scandinavian-inspired furniture . + KAOS Architects Via Archdaily Photography by Terje Ugandi and Maris Tomba via KAOS Architects

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New guest home in Estonia uses a weathered metal facade to blend into ancient castle ruins

James Whitaker unveils modular prefab home system that can be ‘daisy-chained together’

December 3, 2018 by  
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From crystalline-inspired homes to funky cargotecture office spaces , James Whitaker ‘s unique shipping container designs have taken the world by storm. However, the prolific architect is now branching out to design modular homes that not only add more versatility to home design, but can withstand various climates. Whitaker has just unveiled the Anywhere House, a lakeside residence comprised of multiple prefabricated modular units . Slated for completion in 2019, the home will be the first property built using Whitaker’s prefabricated modular system. Known for his unique designs that include building with shipping containers, Whitaker has now developed his own prefabricated modular system , which can be used for a number of purposes. After receiving numerous requests to build the “starburst home” design in various regions, Whitaker realized that he needed to develop a new system that could be adapted to different climates. His new prefab modular system’s resilience will be tested with the Anywhere Home, which will be built lakeside in Alberta, Canada. Related: Starburst shipping container home to rise in the California desert The Anywhere Home will contain a number of separate volumes, either clad in patinated steel, or finished in stainless steel. On the interior, timber paneling will be used on the walls and ceilings and marble flooring will run throughout the living space. Large sliding glass doors and multiple windows will flood the interior with natural light. The design of the modular structure is meant to offer optimal flexibility and versatility. The modular system is comprised of individual, but connected volumes that differ in shape and size. The units would be adjoined through two or more openings or closed off to  be used as a singular space. The modules range in size from one to two levels and have slanted roofs that jut out at various angles. According to the architect, his inspiration for the home design was to create a design that could withstand various climates, but also provide a unique design that could be configured depending on the use. The modular prefab system could be adapted into a home, a hotel, social center, etc.  The Anywhere house will feature modules that are fabricated off site and small enough to be easily transported. + James Whitaker Via Dezeen All renders and drawings by Whitaker Studio

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James Whitaker unveils modular prefab home system that can be ‘daisy-chained together’

This Vietnamese home has moving walls that bring in natural light and fresh air

May 10, 2018 by  
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Ho Chi Minh City-based firm Nishizawa Architects created a gorgeous multi-family home that is built to withstand and embrace the natural climate. To provide a breezy, naturally-lit interior, the architects decided to forgo solid walls and install movable partitions that create a peaceful harmony between the living space and its surroundings. Located in Chau Doc, a border town about seven hours from Ho Chi Minh City, the home was constructed for three families to share. The home’s interior  was designed to provide each family with privacy without sacrificing a pleasant living environment. Related: Renovated apartment in Barcelona boasts flexible wooden walls and gorgeous mosaic floors The house’s frame is made from locally-sourced timber set into concrete columns. The architects decided to top the home with three butterfly roofs at differing heights to create an open, spacious interior. The windows and walls were made from thin corrugated metal panels that swing open to let optimal amounts of natural sunlight and ventilation into the home. These natural elements help maintain the various pockets of greenery found throughout the residence. The home also offers stunning views of the expansive rice fields in the distance. + Nishizawa Architects Via Fuzbiz Images via Nishizawa Architects

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This Vietnamese home has moving walls that bring in natural light and fresh air

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