New guest home in Estonia uses a weathered metal facade to blend into ancient castle ruins

February 1, 2019 by  
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Visitors to the the ruins of a 14th-century castle in Vastseliina, Estonia will now have a beautiful place to stay in this beautiful guest home by Estonian architects, Kaos Architects . The Pilgrims’ House was clad in a weathered steel to compliment the ancient ruins of a 14th-century castle. Located in southeastern Estonia, the complex is a medieval setting with the ruins of a 14th century castle and an old pub house tucked into the rolling green hills and valleys adjacent to the Piusa river. When tasked with designing a guest home for the unique space, the bucolic atmosphere prompted the architects to create something that would be modern and comfortable, but that would blend in seamlessly with the landscape as well as the older buildings on site. Related:Modern gabled guesthouse embraces passive solar in Australia Along with the idyllic landscape, the architects were also inspired by the castle’s long history . After a miracle was reported to have taken place there in 1353, the castle complex became a popular pilgrimage destination. Although in ruins today, the site is used as an “experience center” to welcome guests who would like to experience the medieval way of life. To create the new addition to the complex , the architects tucked the Pilgrims’ House into a deep slope in the landscape so that it would not block the view of the castle ruins. Partially hidden by bushes and trees, the center’s weathered metal facade was intentionally used so that it would compliment the red brick and granite of the ruins. On the interior of the building, the design went medieval through and through. High ceilings and wooden doors, brick floors and secret niches create a vibrant, fresh interior with plenty of medieval features such as the steel chandeliers. Various small windows are reminiscent of early castles, offering scenic views while providing the utmost in privacy. In one room, a jet black wall showcases white graphics that were inspired by old engravings, featuring the area’s long history. Guests will enjoy a stay in the Pilgrim’s House where the personnel is dressed in medieval clothing and serve traditional fare. Although the guest rooms are quite humble, they do have hints of modern comforts such as a claw foot bathtub and simple Scandinavian-inspired furniture . + KAOS Architects Via Archdaily Photography by Terje Ugandi and Maris Tomba via KAOS Architects

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New guest home in Estonia uses a weathered metal facade to blend into ancient castle ruins

Self-built Tinhouse is a contemporary take on Isle of Skye vernacular design

July 26, 2016 by  
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Set on the northwestern tip of the Isle of Skye, the 70-square-meter Tinhouse overlooks beautiful views of The Minch strait. The holiday home is both modern and rustic with its gabled form and corrugated aluminum skin. The metal cladding also helps protect the home from the harsh elements. Rural Design founders Gill Smith and Alan Dickson designed and built the Tinhouse over the course of five years and chose materials for “an ease of build by one person.” The architects write: “In this way, the handmade Tinhouse celebrates the self-build tradition commonly found in a rural context.” Related: Modern Cliff House overlooks stunning seaside views on Scotland’s Isle of Skye In contrast to the uniform metal skin, the modern interior sports a diverse color and materials palette. Muted concrete, white-painted surfaces, and timber framing provide a neutral backdrop for the vibrant pops of color used in the furnishings, from the grass green chairs to the sunset orange cushions. The bespoke furniture reflects the “handmade spirit of the house” and is built from recycled materials , such as the beds and seats constructed from leftover structural timber. A series of windows line the side of the house facing the water to frame views of the strait. + Rural Design Via Dezeen Images © David Barbour, Rural Design, Alex Rece

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Self-built Tinhouse is a contemporary take on Isle of Skye vernacular design

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