Water irrigation reservoir and spa in Nepal will harness the power of fog

July 24, 2020 by  
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This unique reservoir and spa design by Margot Krasojevi? Architecture for the Ilam District of Eastern Nepal proposes a fog-harvesting structure to help conserve the area’s water and natural environment. The conceptual project would use a network of solar pumps, pipes and valves as well as a system of reservoirs connected to suspended polypropylene fog nets. Once completed, it would have the ability to produce an average of 3,000 to 5,000 liters of filtered water per day. The region is known for its many tea plantations, a subtropical climate, a range of different altitudes and high humidity, all of which combine to create the perfect conditions for fog formation. Rather than using up precious water for the agricultural landscape, this hydrotherapy health retreat is focused on using a fog net to capture the air’s moisture — with the added bonus of providing filtered water to nearby farms. Related: Portable fog-harvesting AQUAIR harvests clean drinking water from thin air According to the architect, the practice of collecting fog and condensation is rooted in ancient traditions, from the Namib Desert in Africa to dew ponds in Southern England. This contemporary adaptation will use mesh fog nets draped and embedded into the site’s ledge and woven to capture the most water droplets depending on the wind direction. The water droplets that make up the fog are obstructed by the mesh. Then, these droplets flow through the filters and trickle into a collection trough below. The water is then funneled through a pipe network and stored into three pools, one inside to anchor it to the site and two to supply the spa and to be used for agricultural irrigation and drinking water. The fog nets are kept clean and free from toxins, mold and microorganisms using an electrical current. The current will loosen and dislodge airborne pollutants and dust. The location of the project was determined based on where could provide the best conditions for harvest and maximum output efficiency. The nets are hung in sections to allow for adaptation and to accommodate the natural contours of the property. + Margot Krasojevi? Images via Margot Krasojevi?

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Water irrigation reservoir and spa in Nepal will harness the power of fog

Nature lovers rejoice as Great American Outdoors Act wins House vote

July 24, 2020 by  
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On Wednesday, the U.S. House of Representatives approved the  Great American Outdoors Act , which secures funding to protect many U.S.  parks  and recreation areas. Now all the bill needs is President Trump’s signature. The important environmental bill promises permanent funding for the  Land Water Conservation Fund  (LWCF). While most people aren’t familiar with the fund, it has been working behind the scenes since 1964, using oil and gas industry revenue to pay for national, local and state parks and federal historic sites. Related: The importance of greenways during a pandemic The bill reads, “There shall be deposited into the fund an amount equal to 50% of all federal revenues from the development of oil, gas, coal , or alternative or renewable energy on federal lands and waters.” The fund must be used for priority deferred maintenance projects administered by the National Park Service, Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management and Bureau of Indian Education. While the LWCF has existed for over 50 years, non-conservation projects often siphoned off its funds. In 2020, the fund only received $495 million out of the $900 million put into its account — far below the budget needed to maintain  trails  and park facilities. Groups around the country rejoice over this win. “While not costing taxpayers a penny as the funding comes from royalties collected through offshore oil and gas drilling , LWCF has supported over 42,000 parks and recreation projects across the country, secured more than 100 national battlefields and protected more than 2.2 million acres of national parks,” Maite Arce, President and CEO of the  Hispanic Access Foundation , said in a statement. “In fact the majority of Americans live only minutes from an LWCF site. Americans of all stripes reap the benefits of these protected places, which help support local businesses and provide outdoor access and opportunities for hunters, fishermen, climbers,  hikers , bikers, and campers across America.” In light of the pandemic hitting the economy hard and keeping people cooped up to the point of stir craziness, the bill’s passage seems especially timely. A recent poll by the National Recreation and Park Association found that 83% of U.S. adults said that access to open spaces, local parks and trails is essential for their mental and physical well-being during these times. + GlobeNewswire Image via Pexels

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Nature lovers rejoice as Great American Outdoors Act wins House vote

Flow of plastic waste in the ocean could triple by 2040

July 24, 2020 by  
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New research by The Pew Charitable Trusts and SYSTEMIQ has found that the plastic flow into the oceans could triple by 2040 without immediate action. But the study, “Breaking the Plastic Wave: A Comprehensive Assessment of Pathways Towards Stopping Ocean Plastic Pollution,” also outlines solutions that could cut this plastic waste by more than 80%. According to the researchers, the methods currently used to deal with plastic pollution are less effective unless they are consolidated and accompanied by new technology and more research. The report shows that if governments continue addressing plastic waste as they are currently, the amount of plastic waste flowing into oceans could only be reduced by 7% in the next 20 years. With no intervention, the plastic waste entering the ocean could grow from 11 million to 29 million metric tons by 2040. Because plastic lasts for hundreds of years, the cumulative amount pf ocean plastic could reach 600 million tons (the equivalent weight of 3 million blue whales) by that point. Related: Record high amount of microplastic found on seafloors “Breaking the Plastic Wave” identifies eight measures that could reduce plastic waste by 80%. The proposed measures include reducing plastic production and consumption, substituting plastics with biodegradable alternatives, designing product packaging for recycling , increasing recycling, increasing waste collection rates and reducing plastic waste exports. More technological advancements, business models and research and development are needed to completely eliminate plastic waste in the oceans, according to the study. Although many of these methods are already being applied by some governments, the report proposes a more consolidated approach. The researchers estimate that governments could save up to $70 billion and reduce plastic-related greenhouse gas emissions by 25% by 2040 by adopting these measures together. According to Martin Stuchtey, SYSTEMIQ’s founder, the plastic pollution problem is solvable if action is taken now. “Our results indicate that the plastic crisis is solvable,” Stuchtey said. “It took a generation to create this challenge; this report shows we can solve it in one generation.” + Breaking the Plastic Wave Image via Sergei Tokmakov

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Flow of plastic waste in the ocean could triple by 2040

Abandoned 400-year-old Greek ruins transformed with brilliant bursts of color

August 6, 2018 by  
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Artists Thomas Granseuer and Tomislav Topic of the multidisciplinary German design practice Quintessenz have transformed ancient stone ruins in Kagkatika, Greece into a spectacular work of art that straddles the line between the analog and digital worlds. Commissioned by the Paxos Contemporary Art Project , Quintessenz crafted a large-scale art installation using 120 mesh layers of varying colors. Dubbed Kagkatikas Secret, the colorful artwork flutters in the wind, creating an extra dimension to the surreal piece. Kagkatikas Secret stands in striking contrast to its centuries-old stone backdrop. The mesh panels, strung up with thin wires, were spray painted a variety of colors and then cut into differing sizes. The panels were hung in order of their size—the largest were placed at the rear near the stone windows that frame views of the sea—to create the illusion of depth. This installation builds on Quintessenz’s signature style, which derives inspiration from graffiti culture, graphic design and chromatics. “The work unfolds in an approximately 400-year-old ruin and forms a unique contrast,” explains Quintessenz in a project statement. “It is detached from the usual city bustle and is not in competition with glaring lights or obtrusive advertising. The wind and the sunlight make the installation appear like a digital body in the real world. It forms the interface between analog and digital, between today and then and between old and new. The great contrast makes the installation look almost unreal, as soon as the wind settles in the layers and the sunlight underlines the colors even more, it seems as if there is only one place for this installation. This, in turn, the contrast fits in and creates exciting synergies.” Related: Nendo Unveils Collection of Sculptural Objects Made From Japanese Farming Nets Quintessenz was selected along with seven other artists for the inaugural Paxos Contemporary Art Project, a site-specific artist initiative on the Ionian island of Paxos. + Quintessenz Images via Quintessenz

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Abandoned 400-year-old Greek ruins transformed with brilliant bursts of color

What can I reuse or recycle to repair the mesh on bicycle panniers?

November 4, 2011 by  
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Good friend of Recycle This and The Really Good Life , Su, has got a question for us: Bicycle panniers – mine have a really useful stretchy mesh pocket on the outside, unfortunately now more hole than mesh. Any ideas on repairing them? The actual pannier part is absolutely fine. The summer before last, I bought some mens’ shorts for myself and since I don’t have things down there in need of containment, I removed the “netting” layer – that wouldn’t have been pretty but would have fit the bill perfectly – stretchy white mesh. (I ended up using it in the greenhouse to store bulbs.) Can anyone think of anything else in the same vein to reuse instead? Heavy (so they won’t run) nylon tights maybe? Another idea which is less reusing/recycling but still repairing: could you crochet a flat mesh from a plastic twine using a variant on a string bag patten? I used to make a version of this bag from all sorts of different yarns when we were short of shopping bags – makes up very quickly because it’s so much hole 🙂 Any other ideas? (Photo by arifm )

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What can I reuse or recycle to repair the mesh on bicycle panniers?

Spiral Garden is a Lacy Mesh Vertical Farm for the City

October 11, 2010 by  
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Read the rest of Spiral Garden is a Lacy Mesh Vertical Farm for the City http://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/ohttp://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/options-general.php?page=better_feedptions-general.php?page=better_feed Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , anna julibert , benet and saida dalmau , carmen vilar , designboom , Eco Architecture , eco design , Gardening , green architecture , green design , greenhouse , mesh , spiral garden , vertical garden

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Spiral Garden is a Lacy Mesh Vertical Farm for the City

The Agoras Project Creates a Quiet Urban Escape in Busy Istanbul

October 11, 2010 by  
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Read the rest of The Agoras Project Creates a Quiet Urban Escape in Busy Istanbul http://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/ohttp://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/options-general.php?page=better_feedptions-general.php?page=better_feed Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , “sustainable development” , agoras , eco design , eco residences , eco tower , GAD , global architectural development , green architecture , green design , green development , istanbul , mixed-use development , sustainable design , the agoras project , turkey

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The Agoras Project Creates a Quiet Urban Escape in Busy Istanbul

Ambiente Modular Housing Made from Recycled Glass

October 11, 2010 by  
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The Ambiente Housing System is an eco-friendly method for building modular homes from waste glass.

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Ambiente Modular Housing Made from Recycled Glass

Conflux Festival 2010 Explores the Urban Environment of NYC

October 11, 2010 by  
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This past weekend the Conflux Festival kicked off another exciting series of site-specific workshops, performances, lectures, and installations that challenged New Yorkers to rethink our urban environment in a whole new way.

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Conflux Festival 2010 Explores the Urban Environment of NYC

Oasis-Sprouting Solar Umbrellas for Los Angeles

October 11, 2010 by  
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Project UMBRELLA just took the $5,000 first place award in The Architect’s Newspaper and SCI?Arc’s recent Los Angeles Cleantech Corridor and Green District Competition, which asked entrants to envision downtown LA as an incubator for green technology and jobs. Designed by Constantin Boincean, Ralph Bertram and Aleksandra Danielak, UMBRELLA features a series of umbrella-like solar evaporators that collect and clean city sewage so that it can eventually be released into the streets, generating a “transformation into a network of lush, cultivated landscapes.” Read the rest of Oasis-Sprouting Solar Umbrellas for Los Angeles http://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/ohttp://www.inhabitat.com/wp-admin/options-general.php?page=better_feedptions-general.php?page=better_feed Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , architect’s newspaper , cleantech corridor , Green Building , green design , Los Angeles , Sci-Arc , sustainable design , umbrella

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