New report reveals the sugar industry paid Harvard scientists to promote sugar over fat

September 15, 2016 by  
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Over the years, there have been many disagreements in the health community about which foods are bad for us. New research from the University of California, San Francisco reveals that a major sugar industry trade group paid food scientists at Harvard University in the 1960s to blame dietary fats for heart disease . That move created a legacy whereby sugar got off easy, and made its way into nearly every type of processed and packaged food, while fat was vilified. This slanted misinformation campaign led directly to the rise of “low fat” and “reduced fat” foods, which health experts now say are even worse for you than full fat versions. Cristin E. Kearns , a postdoctoral fellow at UCSF, examined documents from Harvard, the University of Illinois and other libraries to unearth the damning evidence. In the 1960s,  heart disease was on the rise in America, and researchers began looking at sugar as a likely contributing factor. Kearns found that, when sugar industry giants got wind of the research trend, they worked swiftly to shut it down. The trade group Sugar Research Foundation (SRF) (now known as the Sugar Association) paid three Harvard scientists $6500 ($48,900 in 2016 dollars) to publish a report on heart disease that blamed fat and exonerated sugar. Related: 8 Vegan and gluten-free desserts made without refined sugar The scientists did exactly that. In a 1967 review of prior research on sugar, fat, and heart disease published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the Harvard team “minimized the link between sugar and heart health, and cast aspersions on the role of saturated fat,” the New York Times reported. At the time, SRF vice president and director of research John Hickson made the organization’s mission quite clear. Rather than discover the truth and work to protect Americans’ health and well-being, Hickson suggested that SRF “could embark on a major program” to counter “negative attitudes toward sugar.” Paying off scientists to publish biased reviews turned out to be the silver bullet to do just that. Now, with heart disease and obesity rates rocketing sky high, the healthcare system struggles to clean up the mess, while government leaders slowly but surely take measures to reduce the demand for sugary treats. Philadelphia was the first U.S. city to enact a “soda tax” earlier this year, and others are expected to follow in the fight to save Americans from the deadly white stuff . The study results were published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. Via Treehugger Images via Gunilla G/Flickr and Shutterstock

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New report reveals the sugar industry paid Harvard scientists to promote sugar over fat

Canadian clay kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria on contact

February 1, 2016 by  
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Aboriginal Canadians used clay from Kisameet Bay, British Columbia to treat their ailments for centuries – from stomach complaints to skin irritation. Now, researchers have found that there might just be something to the clay’s purported healing properties after all. It turns out this 10,000-year-old deposit of clay is highly effective against many serious antibiotic-resistant infections. Read the rest of Canadian clay kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria on contact

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Canadian clay kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria on contact

NIH promises to retire remaining research chimps

November 19, 2015 by  
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Good news! The National Institutes of Health has announced it will no longer use chimps for medical studies — and the last 50 chimpanzees in the agency’s care are getting ready to retire to a federal sanctuary. There’s just one catch: the chimps will have to wait until there’s room to house them and some chimps have died while waiting on the list. Read the rest of NIH promises to retire remaining research chimps

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NIH promises to retire remaining research chimps

Apple’s ResearchKit turns iPhones into powerful medical research tools

March 10, 2015 by  
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This week, Apple released details of its new software platform ResearchKit , which was  announced yesterday alongside the launch of the new Apple Watch and updated MacBook. ResearchKit was designed to give medical researchers amazing new tools to help combat a variety of ailments that impact millions of people worldwide. ResearchKit is already being used for five medical apps , and many more are coming in the near future. Read the rest of Apple’s ResearchKit turns iPhones into powerful medical research tools Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: apple medical research , apple new products , apple open source software , apple researchkit , breast cancer research , cardiovascular disease research , healthcare research , iPhone , medical research , parkinsons research

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Apple’s ResearchKit turns iPhones into powerful medical research tools

ACES’ 3D Printing BioPen Could Redraw the Way We Approach Bone Surgery

October 4, 2014 by  
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Fabricating artificial bones is one of the most interesting byproducts of the 3D-printing revolution . In the latest development , Australian researchers developed a BioPen that deposits regenerative stem cells onto damaged bone and cartilage in a process similar to 3D printing. Scientists at the Australian Research Council Center of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) at the University of Wollongong in New South Wales say their bone growth pen combines 3D-printing with stem cell research to regrow missing or diseased bone faster and more accurately. Read the rest of ACES’ 3D Printing BioPen Could Redraw the Way We Approach Bone Surgery Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d printed bone , 3d printing bones , 3D printing cells , ACES , ACES BioPen , Aikenhead Centre for Medical Discovery , Australian 3d printed bones , Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science , BioPen , bone replacement , bone surgery , medical research , Peter Choong , seaweed derived polymer , seaweed extract , St Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne , stem cells , University of Wollongong

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ACES’ 3D Printing BioPen Could Redraw the Way We Approach Bone Surgery

Biodegradable Batteries Could Revolutionize Medical Implants

March 26, 2014 by  
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Doctors who want to be able to monitor a patient’s vital signs or easily deliver treatments could soon have a new tool at their disposal — electronic implants which are inserted under the skin, and which eventually melt away once they’ve served their purpose and treatment is complete. Biodegradable silicon chips have already been available since 2012 , but unfortunately there’s been no easy way to power the devices. Some of them use induction coils to draw wireless power from external sources, but devices deep within tissue or under the bone haven’t been able to effectively use this technology. Read the rest of Biodegradable Batteries Could Revolutionize Medical Implants Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: batteries , biodegradable batteries , biodegradable medical devices , biodegradable tech , electronic medical implants , internal medical devices , medical research , medical treatments        

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Biodegradable Batteries Could Revolutionize Medical Implants

Next Generation Membrane Pacemakers Wrap the Heart Like an Electronic Glove

March 3, 2014 by  
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This heart is wrapped in a special electronic membrane that keeps it beating at the perfect rate. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis developed the new membrane to wrap around hearts like a custom-made glove. A spiderweb-like network of specialized electrodes continuously monitor the heart’s electrical activity to keep it beating around the clock at a healthy rate. Read the rest of Next Generation Membrane Pacemakers Wrap the Heart Like an Electronic Glove Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d printed heart , 3d printer , 3D printing , cardiology , cardiovascular system , computer modeling , Fringe Tech , Future Tech , green technology , heart electronic glove , heart membrane , high-resolution imaging , implantable defibrillators , medical research , medical technology , pacemaker , plastic model , rabbit heart , research , science , st. louis , university of illinois , Urbana-Champaign , washington university        

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Next Generation Membrane Pacemakers Wrap the Heart Like an Electronic Glove

New Nanoribbon Implant Powers Pacemakers With Heartbeats

January 24, 2014 by  
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Researchers from several institutions in the U.S. and Tsinghua University in China have developed a new implantable generator that can convert heartbeats into energy. The device utilizes a nanoribbon piezoelectric element , and it can be placed on the heart to draw enough energy from the organ’s natural motion to power a pacemaker or other implantable devices. Yes, we are that much closer to becoming cyborgs. Read the rest of New Nanoribbon Implant Powers Pacemakers With Heartbeats Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: animal testing , clinical trials , cyborg heart , diaphragm , Future Tech , green technology , heart , implant , implantable devices , Implanted Devices , implants , lead , lead zirconate titanate nanoribbons , lung , medical implants , medical research , Medicine , Nanoribbon Heart , Nanoribbon piezoelectric device , piezoelectrics , science , Tsinghua University in China , Univeristy of Illinois        

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New Nanoribbon Implant Powers Pacemakers With Heartbeats

Solar-Powered Federation of Korean Industries Tower Boasts One of the World’s Most Efficient Facades

January 24, 2014 by  
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The solar-powered Federation of Korean Industries Tower is now complete in Seoul – and it has one of the world’s most efficient solar facades. Adrian Smith + Gordon Architecture (AS+GG) designed the 240 meter high-rise with a self-regulating external skin that not only collects energy through photovoltaic panels, but also reduces internal heating and cooling loads. Read the rest of Solar-Powered Federation of Korean Industries Tower Boasts One of the World’s Most Efficient Facades Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Adrian Smith + Gordon Architecture (AS+GG) , BIPV facade , building smart skin , Chang-Jo Architects , energy efficient facade , Federation of Korean Industries Tower , high-rise design , korean architecture , office towers Seoul , photovoltaic panels , seoul architecture , solar-powered facade , tower design        

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Solar-Powered Federation of Korean Industries Tower Boasts One of the World’s Most Efficient Facades

VIDEO: Researchers Create 3D Printed Bones Suitable for Use in Medical Procedures

December 2, 2011 by  
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We’ve shown you 3D printed bone models , 3D printed human veins , and a printer that sprays new skin cells on burn victims – but we have to say this latest advancement is the most impressive use for 3d printing yet. Researchers at Washington State University have successfully 3D printed human bones that are suitable for use in orthopedic and dental procedures, as well as for delivering medicine for patients with osteoporosis. Watch a video of the incredible 3D printer in action after the jump! Read the rest of VIDEO: Researchers Create 3D Printed Bones Suitable for Use in Medical Procedures Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3d bone , 3d printer , 3D printing , 3d printing medicine , bone growth technology , bone replacement technology , bone technology , engineering and medicine , growing bone , growing new bones , hip replacement technology , medical advancements , medical research , medicine technology , washington state university , wsu , wsu research

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VIDEO: Researchers Create 3D Printed Bones Suitable for Use in Medical Procedures

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